Gabinete de Promoção do
Programa Quadro de I&DT

Calls - Sinergias

A multidisciplinaridade dos projetos é extremamente valorizada no Horizonte 2020.

Se já conhece bem os tópicos do seu Tema, consulte outras oportunidades que o H2020 lhe poderá proporcionar noutros Temas.
Conheça as sinergias entre os diversos Temas do H2020 nos concursos que foram abertos em 2015 (WP2016/17). A tabela abaixo indica possíveis sinergias entre os Temas, identificando quais os tópicos com interesse para cada tema (linha) que poderão encontrar nos programas de trabalho dos outros temas (colunas).

Para mais esclarecimentos, contacte o seu NCP.

 FETNMP+BICTEspaçoSaúdeBioeconomiaEnergiaTransportesClimaSociedadesSegurança
FET Ver
NMP+BVer VerVerVerVerVer
ICTVerVer VerVerVerVerVerVerVerVer
EspaçoVerVer VerVer
SaúdeVerVerVerVer VerVer
BioeconomiaVerVerVerVer VerVerVer
EnergiaVerVerVerVerVer VerVerVer
TransportesVerVerVerVerVerVer VerVer
ClimaVerVerVerVerVerVerVer Ver
SociedadesVerVerVerVerVerVerVerVer Ver
SegurançaVerVerVerVerVerVer 
FET    <<    ICT
ICT-04-2017Smart Anything Everywhere Initiatived.l. 08-11-2016
Call H2020-ICT-2017-1 (subcall de: H2020-ICT-2017)
Information and Communication Technologies
Orçamento 233,50 M€
Specific Challenge: "Smart anything everywhere" stands for the next wave of products that integrate digital technology inside. A major challenge is to accelerate the design, development and uptake of advanced digital technologies by European industry, especially among them many SMEs and mid-caps in products that include innovative electronic components, software and systems .

Scope: a. Innovation Actions should address all of the following three aspects.  
i.    Establishing across Europe networks of multidisciplinary competence centres offering one-stop shops/marketplaces for companies that want to experiment with digital technologies inside their products. Centres should act as "innovation hubs" offering facilities (access to technology platforms) and services for developing innovative products, such as design, manufacturing, rapid prototyping and life-cycle management. They should also act as brokers between suppliers and users of technology products and solutions. Competence centres are encouraged to link to existing and emerging regional (smart specialisation) or national innovation hubs. If Horizon 2020 funding is complemented by ESIF or other regional or national funds, Horizon 2020 funding should be used for carrying out highly innovative experiments that will multiply the impact of local initiatives to a European scale, and will build partnerships between businesses in Europe.  
ii.    Carrying out a critical mass of cross-border experiments bringing together different key actors along the full value chain to customise the technologies according to the requirements of the users. Driven by the requirements of first-time users, Application Experiments bring together the actors of the value chain and the experts necessary to enable new users to develop novel products or services and assist them in customising and applying these in their respective environments. Alternatively competence centers could provide access to design and prototyping and small value production or a combination of the above. Experiment descriptions in proposals should include an outline of the initial exploitation plan and business scenario. To remain flexible on which experiments will be carried out and to stay flexible in fast moving markets, the action may involve financial support to third parties, in line with the conditions set out in part K of the General Annexes. The proposal will define the selection process of additional users and suppliers running the experiments for which financial support will be granted (typically in the order of EUR 20 000 – 100 000  per party). Maximum 50% of the EU funding can be allocated to financial support to third parties.  
iii.    Activities to achieve long-term sustainability of one-stop shop / market place services by the competence centres and the eco-system. This includes the development of a business plan for the competence centres and the marketplace, of which an outline business scenario should be described in the proposal. In addition, investors should be attracted to support business development of SMEs and mid-cap actors in successful experiments. Such activities would include also dissemination and support to exploitation. Among others, communication and dissemination activities shall make use of established networks reaching out to SMEs like the Enterprise Europe Network and the NCP network.
Innovation actions are expected to focus on one or more of the following four areas of technologies. Selected projects are expected to collaborate on building the European "Smart Anything Everywhere" ecosystem:  
•    Area 1: Cyber-physical and embedded systems: The goal is to help businesses from any sector uplift the quality and performance of their products and services with innovative embedded ICT components and systems and to support eco-system building for promising platforms developed in earlier R&I products.  
•    Area 2: Customised low energy computing powering CPS and the IoT: The goal is to help businesses who are developing products for situations where high computing capacity and low energy would be a competitive advantage and to support eco-system building for promising platforms developed in earlier low power computing projects.  
•    Area 3: Advanced micro-electronics components and Smart System Integration: The goal is to support electronic components, sensors, smart objects and systems (i) access  to advanced design and manufacturing for academia, research institutes and SMEs, and (ii) rapid prototyping targeting SMEs.  
•    Area 4: Organic and large area electronics: The goal is to help businesses in further maturing, innovating and validating their products with organic and large area electronics technologies. Focus is on i) access to design, technology and prototyping which are mature and ready to use, and ii) application experiments driven by concrete user requirements and business cases.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to 7 million would allow areas (1), (2) and (3) to be addressed appropriately. The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to 4.5 million would allow area (4) to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. At least one innovation action is supported for each area of technologies.
b. Coordination and Support actions
The aim is to reinforce the collaboration between the actions supported under this initiative, to increase the outreach of these actions and their impact and to achieve a wider coverage of stakeholders in technological, application, innovation, and geographic terms. Tasks and services should include maintaining a single innovation portal for newcomers; sharing of best practices and experiences; dissemination; identifying new innovative ICT technologies that can benefit from this scheme, brokering between users and suppliers; leveraging further investment by creating linkages with regional/national initiatives and by stimulating organic growth.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to 1 million would allow this area to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact: Proposals should address all of the following impact criteria, providing metrics to measure success when appropriate.  
•    Innovation in products, processes and business models leading to quantifiable increases in market shares and/or productivity of European companies and/or industrial capacities in Europe, notably for SMEs and mid-caps operating in non tech sectors.  
•    Business growth and increase competitiveness of digital technology suppliers, in particular SMEs, able to supply components and systems that may be integrated in various products.  
•    Creation of a self-sustainable ecosystem of innovation hubs including ICT suppliers and users supported by services available through a one stop shop, covering a large number of regions and their smart specialisation.

Type of Action: Innovation action, Coordination and support action
ICT-05-2017Customised and low energy computing (including Low power processor technologies)d.l. 25-04-2017
Call H2020-ICT-2017-2 (subcall de: H2020-ICT-2017)
Information and Communication Technologies
Orçamento 392,00 M€
Specific Challenge: Information and Communication Technologies are becoming a core component of products in all market sectors. The trend towards “Smart Anything Everywhere” must be supported by innovations allowing a very significant reduction of two complementary aspects: the cost and complexity of software development for modern architectures, and the energy footprint of computation and communication.
Software development is one key challenge, because current programming tools do not fully support emerging system architectures. Massively parallel and heterogeneous systems are difficult to program and to optimise dynamically for the multiple conflicting criteria imposed by the application domain like performance, energy efficiency, dependability, real-time response, resiliency, fault tolerance and certifiability.
The targeted markets are cyber-physical systems, industrial and professional applications, Internet of Things, connected smart objects and all the application areas where very low energy consumption is essential and where non-functional requirements like guaranteed performance, high reliability levels or hardware-enforced security may be critical.
A complementary challenge comes from the hardware limitations of today's processor architectures, especially for delivering high computing performance in low power envelopes. This is a serious problem for the development of very promising application areas, e.g. at the convergence between high performance computing, big data and deep learning.
To overcome these limitations, there is the need to develop a new generation of innovative, secure and reliable processors for systems based on highly parallel and heterogeneous architectures. Targeted markets are high performance computing and server workloads where energy efficiency, compact physical size and low power consumption are strong requirements.

Scope:  
a. Research and Innovation Actions
Programming environments and toolboxes for low energy and highly parallel computing: Proposals will provide programming environments and tools optimised for specific application domains of significant economic value, ideally covering the complete software stack from runtime systems to application programming. The solutions proposed will support modern system architectures possibly including those based on heterogeneous processors while allowing for optimization of energy, performance, reliability, time predictability and system cost. All the activities needed in software development should be addressed when relevant; e.g.: remote collaboration, debugging and bug tracking, runtime software analysis. Model-based approaches and reuse and extension of existing platforms, libraries, frameworks and tools are encouraged, resulting ideally in solutions which are practically usable for application development for real-world use cases and provide mechanisms for further future extensions and introduction of new functionalities.
Security by design features allowing applications to be resilient to cyber-attacks are encouraged to be part of the proposed technology, as well as features for energy-aware solutions and for tolerating hardware and software errors while guaranteeing the required service level.
Solutions will be demonstrated in real-life applications through at least two different use cases complementing each other, and will provide significant and measurable improvements over state-of-the-art methods and technologies in productivity, software quality and energy consumption. This should be complemented by appropriate activities to build a community of users to ensure the uptake of the work after the end of the project.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 4 and 6 million would allow this area to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.
b. Research and Innovation Actions
Low power processor technologies: Proposals will provide innovative processor designs delivering a substantial and measurable improvement over the current state of the art in energy/performance ratio for typical high performance computing and server workloads. The limitations of today's technologies will be addressed, e.g. power density, thermal management, memory access speed and latency, efficient on-chip and off-chip communication. The proposed solutions will ideally include hardware-based security features and may optionally include support for real-time applications e.g. guaranteed execution time.
Proposals are expected to go beyond current semiconductor technologies, but also to take into account the reality of semiconductor market both in the technology and in the business model, providing solutions that can be actually manufactured in volume at reasonable cost, and appropriately addressing intellectual property issues. Consortia will include the required expertise to successfully bring hardware design to the market and to provide real-life application requirements from the targeted markets.
A working prototype, based on real-life applications representative of the targeted markets, will be demonstrated before the end of the project.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 6 and 10 million would allow this area to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. No more than one action will be funded.
c. Coordination and Support Actions for structuring and connecting the European academic and industrial research and innovation communities. Activities will include (e.g.) cross-sectorial industrial platform-building, constituency building and consultations, clustering of related projects, and road-mapping for future research and innovation in the area of computing for Cyber-Physical Systems, high performance computing and industrial applications. No more than one action will be funded.

Expected Impact: For "a. Programming environments and toolboxes":
Proposals should address one or more of the following impact criteria, providing metrics to measure success where appropriate:  
•    Reinforce and broaden Europe's strong position in low-energy computing by reducing the effort needed to include digital technology inside any type of product or service, including outside the traditional “high-tech” sectors.  
•    Availability of software development environments and tools allowing easy development of applications for parallel and heterogeneous architectures. Tools should be usable in realistic use cases, and should significantly increase the productivity in efficiently programming and maintaining advanced computing systems as compared to the state of the art at the time of proposal writing.  
•    Higher share of European SMEs and mid-caps in the reference markets, both on the supply and the demand side.
For "b. Low power processor technologies":
Availability of a new family of processors with a significantly better energy/performance ratio compared to current offerings, specifically tailored for high-performance and low-power server-side applications.
For "c. Coordination and Support Actions":   
•    Increased cooperation between industrial and academic communities;  
•    Increased synergy and collaboration between projects, high-quality roadmap for future research and innovation activities in the relevant areas.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action, Coordination and support action

   

NMP+B    <<    FET
FETHPC-02-2017Transition to Exascale Computingd.l. 26-09-2017
Call FETHPC-02-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETHPC-2016-2017)
Transition to Exascale Computing
Orçamento 40,00 M€

FETHPC-02-2017: Transition to Exascale Computing


Specific Challenge:

Take advantage of the full capabilities of exascale computing, in particular through high-productivity programming environments, system software and management, exascale I/O and storage in the presence of multiple tiers of data storage, supercomputing for extreme data and emerging HPC use modes, mathematics and algorithms for extreme scale HPC systems for existing or visionary applications, including data-intensive and extreme data applications in scientific areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, life sciences, materials, climate, geosciences, etc.


Scope:

Proposals should address one or more of the following subtopics:


a) High productivity programming environments for exascale: Proposals should have as target to simplify application software development for large- and extreme-scale systems. This can include the development of more productive programming models and environments, the easier combination of different programming models, and using increased intelligence throughout the programming environment. Key aspects include managing data transfers, data locality and memory management, including support for heterogeneous and reconfigurable systems as well as dealing with inter-application dynamic load balancing and malleability, adapting to changes in the number of processors. Unified performance tools are required supporting HPC, embedded and extreme data workloads, on diverse target systems. APIs, runtime systems and the underlying libraries should support auto-tuning for performance and energy optimisation. Automated support for debugging and anomaly detection is also included under this subtopic. To provide simplified development and to ensure the maintainability of domain-specific languages (DSLs), DSL frameworks are required which target a general-purpose stable programming model and runtime. Since large future systems will require the use of multiple programming models or APIs, an important aspect is interoperability and standardisation of programming model, API and runtime as well as the composability of programming models (the capability of building new programming models out of existing programming model elements)

b) Exascale system software and management: Proposals should advance the state of the art in system software and management for node architectures that will be drastically more complex and their resource topology and heterogeneity will require OS and runtime enhancement, such as data aware scheduling. In the area of hardware abstraction, proposals should address run time handling of all types of resources (cores, bandwidth, logical and physical memory or storage) and controls, e.g. for optimised data coherency, consistency and data flow. For applications, proposals should address new multi-criteria resource allocation capabilities and interaction during task execution, with the aim to improve resilience, interactivity, power and efficiency. To cope with the exploding amount of data, the sequential analysis process (capture, store, analyse) is not sufficient; proposals should explore on-the-fly analysis methods offering reactivity, compute efficiency and availability. Graphical simulation interaction will require new real-time features; configuration and deployment tools will have to evolve to take into account the composability of software execution environments.

c) Exascale I/O and storage in the presence of multiple tiers of data storage: proposals should address exascale I/O systems expected to have multiple tiers of data storage technologies, including non-volatile memory. Fine grain data access prioritisation of processes and applications sharing data in these tiers is one of the goals as well as prioritisation applied to file/object creates/deletes. Runtime layers should combine data replication with data layout transformations relevant for HPC, in order to meet the needs for improved performance and resiliency. It is also desirable for the I/O subsystem to adaptively provide optimal performance or reliability especially in the presence of millions of processes simultaneously doing I/O. It is critical that programming system interoperability and standardised APIs are achieved. On the fly data management supporting data processing, taking into account multi-tiered storage and involving real time in situ/in transit processing should be addressed.

d) Supercomputing for Extreme Data and emerging HPC use modes: HPC architectures for real-time and in-situ data analytics are required to support the processing of large-scale and high velocity real-time data (e.g. sensor data, Internet of Things) together with large volumes of stored data (e.g. climate simulations, predictive models, etc.). The approaches should include support for real-time in-memory analysis of different data structures, direct processing of compressed data and appropriate benchmarking method for performance analysis. Interactive 3-D visualisation of large-scale data to allow users to explore large information spaces in 3-D and perform on-demand data analysis in real-time (e.g. large scale queries or analytics) should be addressed. Interactive supercomputing is required to execute complex workflows for urgent decision making in the field of critical clinical diagnostics, natural risks or spread of diseases; this implies adapting operational procedures of HPC infrastructures, developing efficient co-scheduling techniques or improving checkpoint/restart and extreme data management

e) Mathematics and algorithms for extreme scale HPC systems and applications working with extreme data: Specific issues are quantification of uncertainties and noise, multi-scale, multi-physics and extreme data. Mathematical methods, numerical analysis, algorithms and software engineering for extreme parallelism should be addressed. Novel and disruptive algorithmic strategies should be explored to minimize data movement as well as the number of communication and synchronization instances in extreme computing. Parallel-in-time methods may be investigated to boost parallelism of simulation codes across a wide range of application domains. Taking into account data-related uncertainties is essential for the acceptance of numerical simulation in decision making; a unified European VVUQ (Verification Validation and Uncertainty Quantification) package for Exascale computing should be provided by improving methodologies and solving problems limiting usability for very large computations on many-core configurations; access to the VVUQ techniques for the HPC community should be facilitated by providing software that is ready for deployment on supercomputers.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 2 and 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. Proposals should clearly indicate the subtopic which is their main focus. At least one project per subtopic will be funded.


Expected Impact:

  • Contribution to the realisation of the ETP4HPC Strategic Research Agenda, thus strengthened European research and industrial leadership in HPC technologies.
  • Successful transition to practical exascale computing for the addressed specific element of the HPC stack.
  • Covering important segments of the broader and/or emerging HPC markets, especially extreme-computing, emerging use modes and extreme-data HPC systems.
  • Impact on standards bodies and other relevant international research programmes and frameworks.
  • European excellence in mathematics and algorithms for extreme parallelism and extreme data applications to boost research and innovation in scientific areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, life sciences, materials, climate, geosciences, etc.

FETHPC-03-2017Exascale HPC ecosystem developmentd.l. 26-09-2017
Call FETHPC-03-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETHPC-2016-2017)
Exascale HPC ecosystem developmen
Orçamento 4,00 M€

FETHPC-03-2017: Exascale HPC ecosystem development


Specific Challenge:

To develop a sustainable European exascale HPC Ecosystem.

Scope:

Proposals should address a single of the two following subtopics:

a) Coordination of the Exascale HPC strategy and International Collaboration: Proposals must include activities for promoting a joint community structuring and synchronisation; the further development and update of the Strategic Research Agenda for High Performance Computing as well as the application and applied mathematics exascale roadmaps; prepare the ground for targeted international research collaboration on specific aspects of the exascale challenges. Proposed actions should also seek to create synergies with other HPC related activities under H2020, in particular concerning the underlying basic technologies that are required for exascale computing (e.g. LEIT/Advanced Computing, LEIT/Photonics, and ECSEL (Electronic Components and Systems for European Leadership)); and concerning the relevant research in applications, the progress of which critically relies on cutting-edge HPC systems (LEIT/Big-Data, LEIT/Cloud area as well as relevant research in applications emerging from the H2020 Societal Challenges in domains such as health (e.g. VPH initiative), genomics, climate change, energy, mobility and smart cities).

b) Excellence in Exascale Computing Systems: The focus should be in boosting European HPC academic research excellence in future exascale-class computing cutting across all levels – hardware, architectures, programming, applications – and including specific actions to better structure the European academic HPC research, create stronger links with HPC providers and HPC users, attract venture capital, promote entrepreneurship and foster industry take-up.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

    • Strengthened European research and industrial leadership in the supply, operation and use of HPC systems.
    • Contribution to the realisation of the ETP4HPC Strategic Research Agenda.
    • Development of a competitive European ecosystem for building and exploiting a wide range of next-generation extreme performance computing systems.
    • Structuring the efforts of stakeholders for implementing the European HPC strategy.
    • Reinforced cooperation in international endeavours on HPC software and systems towards exascale.
    • European Excellence in Exascale Computing systems

FETOPEN-01-2016-2017FET-Open research and innovation actionsd.l. 27-09-2017
Call FETOPEN-01-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETOPEN-2016-2017)
FET-Open research and innovation actions
Orçamento 110,50 M€
Specific Challenge: The successful exploration of new foundations for radically new future technologies requires supporting a large set of early stage, high risk visionary science and technology projects to investigate new ideas. Here agile, risk-friendly and highly interdisciplinary research approaches are needed with collaborations that are open to all sciences and disciplines and that dissolve the traditional boundaries between them. The renewal of ideas is complemented by the renewal of actors taking these new ideas forward. Therefore, this topic encourages the driving role of new high-potential actors in research and innovation, such as excellent young, both female and male, researchers and high-tech SMEs that may become the scientific and industrial leaders of the future.

Scope: This topic supports the early stages of research to establish a new technological possibility. Proposals are sought for collaborative research with all of the following characteristics ('FET gatekeepers'):  
•    Long-term vision: the research proposed must address a new and radical long-term vision of a science- and technology-enabled future that is far beyond the state of the art and not currently foreseen by technology roadmaps.  
•    Breakthrough scientific and technological target: research must target a scientifically ambitious and technologically concrete breakthrough, argued to be a crucial step towards achieving the long-term vision. The plausibility of the proposed breakthrough(s) to be attained within the life-time of the project must be argued in the proposal.  
•    Novelty: the research proposed for achieving the breakthrough must be based on cutting-edge knowledge, new ideas and concepts, rather than in the mere application or incremental refinement of existing ones.  
•    Foundational: the breakthroughs that are envisaged must be foundational in the sense that, if achieved, they would establish an essential basis for a new kind of technology and its future uses, not currently anticipated.  
•    High-risk: the inherently high risk of the research proposed will be reflected in a flexible but effective methodology for exploring alternative directions and options, supported by open and agile research and innovation practices.  
•    Interdisciplinary: the proposed collaborations are expected to go beyond 'waterfall' configurations in multi-disciplinary science- and technology research. Instead they should seek new solutions through genuine exchanges, mutual learning, cross-fertilisation and synergistic advances among distant disciplines in order to open unexplored areas of investigation and new directions for joint research.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 3 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:   
•    Initiating or consolidating a baseline of feasibility for a radically new line of technology and its future uses by establishing the essential proofs-of-principle and their foundational scientific underpinnings.  
•    Strengthening European leadership in the early exploration of visionary, new and emerging technologies, beyond academic excellence and with global recognition. This impact can be reinforced by involving also new high-potential actors such as young, both female and male, researchers and high-tech SMEs that may become the European scientific and technological leaders and innovators of the future.  
•    Impact is also sought in terms of the take up of new research and innovation practices for making leading-edge science and technology research more open, collaborative, creative and closer to society.  

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action
FETOPEN-03-2017FET-Open Coordination and Support Actionsd.l. 20-03-2017
Call FETOPEN-03-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETOPEN-2016-2017)
FET-Open Coordination and Support Actions
Orçamento 1,50 M€
Specific Challenge:

The challenge is to make Europe the best place in the world for collaborative research and innovation on future and emerging technologies that will renew the basis for future European competitiveness and growth, and that will make a difference for society in the decades to come.

Scope:

Proposals should address one of the following topics:

  1. FET Futures [2017] [[This activity directly aimed at supporting the development and implementation of evidence base for R&I policies is excluded from the delegation to REA and will be implemented by the Commission services.]]: identifying strategy options, challenges and opportunities to stimulate and organise interdisciplinary research and innovation towards new and visionary technologies of any kind. Actions should rely on evidence from FET activities (e.g., portfolio, constituency, results) and from other sources (including other funding bodies or private initiatives worldwide, like those using prize schemes or challenges). They should aim at open and dynamic stakeholder participation using creative methods and on-line tools/social networks. This topic should include public engagement processes as discussed in the introduction of this FET Work Programme.
  2. FET Exchange [2017]: actions for structuring and strengthening an emerging FET-relevant science and technology research and innovation topic and the interdisciplinary communities involved in this topic. This may include, for example, research roadmapping, stimulating (formal and informal) learning and exchange, expanding the range of disciplines (including the life sciences and humanities where relevant), involving new actors such as young researchers, entrepreneurs and high-tech SMEs, and broadening stakeholder engagement (multi-actor or citizen).

For scope item a) at most one action will be funded.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 0.3 and 0.5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Strengthening globally recognised European leadership in the early exploration of visionary, new and emerging technologies, beyond academic excellence and with a strong engagement of scientists, citizens, innovators and policy makers.
Improved long-term innovation potential in Europe both from the abundance of novel ideas and the range of actors ready to take them forward.
Improved understanding of the range of possible impact mechanisms for long-term science and technology research.
Improved readiness across Europe to engage in silo-breaking research collaboration and to take up new research and innovation practices.

FETOPEN-04-2016-2017FET Innovation Launchpadd.l. 29-09-2016
Call FETOPEN-04-2016 (subcall de: H2020-FETOPEN-2016-2017)
FET Innovation Launchpad
Orçamento 1,20 M€
Specific Challenge:

FET projects often generate new and sometimes unexpected opportunities for commercial or societal application. This topic aims at funding further innovation related work (i.e. activities which were not scheduled to be funded by the original project) to verify and substantiate the innovation potential of ideas arising from FET funded projects and to support the next steps in turning them into a genuine social or economic innovation.

Scope:

Short and focused individual or collaborative actions to take out of the lab a promising result or proof-of-concept that originated from a FET-funded project and to get it on the way to social or economic innovation through new entrepreneurship or otherwise. The action will support the transformation of that specific research result into a credible offering for economic or social impact, by exploring the feasibility of an exploitation path and by coordinating and supporting the assembling of the right knowledge, skills and resources and thus serves as a launch pad for exploitation.

This call topic is focused on the early innovation stages from results of an ongoing or recently finished project[[For a project to be considered 'ongoing or recently finished' in the context of this call topic its end date must be at most one year before the deadline for proposal submission to this topic.]] funded through FET under FP7 or H2020. The complementarity and precise link with the relevant FET project is to be explicitly addressed in the proposal by clearly stating the nature and origin of the results to be taken up, and by adding a confirmation of any necessary agreements with owners or right holders of those results to move towards their exploitation. This call topic does not fund additional research, nor does it fund activities that are/were already foreseen in the relevant FET project. Activities to be funded should be fit-for-purpose (e.g., tailored to the level of maturity of the result to be taken up) and can include, among others, the definition of a commercialisation process to be followed, market and competitiveness analysis, technology assessment, consolidation of intellectual property rights and strategy, scenario and business case development, developing contacts and support relevant activities with for instance, industrial transfer partners, potential licence-takers, investors, societal organisations or potential end users.

By focusing on the very early stage of the innovation path, the scope of this call includes situations where an SME or other suitable entrepreneurial context may not yet exist.

The Commission considers that proposals for actions no longer than 18 months and requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 0.1 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals of different duration.

Expected Impact:
  • Increased innovation potential from FET projects by picking up expected as well as non-anticipated innovation opportunities.
  • Creation of concrete and closer-to-market high-potential innovations from FET projects.
  • Stimulating, supporting and rewarding an open and proactive mind-set towards exploitation beyond the European research world.
  • Seeding future growth and the creation of jobs from FET research.
FETPROACT-02-2017FET ERANET Cofundd.l. 24-01-2017
Call FETPROACT-02-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETPROACT-2016-2017)
FET ERANET Cofund
Orçamento 5,00 M€

FETHPC-02-2017: Transition to Exascale Computing

Specific Challenge:

Take advantage of the full capabilities of exascale computing, in particular through high-productivity programming environments, system software and management, exascale I/O and storage in the presence of multiple tiers of data storage, supercomputing for extreme data and emerging HPC use modes, mathematics and algorithms for extreme scale HPC systems for existing or visionary applications, including data-intensive and extreme data applications in scientific areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, life sciences, materials, climate, geosciences, etc.

Scope:

Proposals should address one or more of the following subtopics:

a) High productivity programming environments for exascale: Proposals should have as target to simplify application software development for large- and extreme-scale systems. This can include the development of more productive programming models and environments, the easier combination of different programming models, and using increased intelligence throughout the programming environment. Key aspects include managing data transfers, data locality and memory management, including support for heterogeneous and reconfigurable systems as well as dealing with inter-application dynamic load balancing and malleability, adapting to changes in the number of processors. Unified performance tools are required supporting HPC, embedded and extreme data workloads, on diverse target systems. APIs, runtime systems and the underlying libraries should support auto-tuning for performance and energy optimisation. Automated support for debugging and anomaly detection is also included under this subtopic. To provide simplified development and to ensure the maintainability of domain-specific languages (DSLs), DSL frameworks are required which target a general-purpose stable programming model and runtime. Since large future systems will require the use of multiple programming models or APIs, an important aspect is interoperability and standardisation of programming model, API and runtime as well as the composability of programming models (the capability of building new programming models out of existing programming model elements)

b) Exascale system software and management: Proposals should advance the state of the art in system software and management for node architectures that will be drastically more complex and their resource topology and heterogeneity will require OS and runtime enhancement, such as data aware scheduling. In the area of hardware abstraction, proposals should address run time handling of all types of resources (cores, bandwidth, logical and physical memory or storage) and controls, e.g. for optimised data coherency, consistency and data flow. For applications, proposals should address new multi-criteria resource allocation capabilities and interaction during task execution, with the aim to improve resilience, interactivity, power and efficiency. To cope with the exploding amount of data, the sequential analysis process (capture, store, analyse) is not sufficient; proposals should explore on-the-fly analysis methods offering reactivity, compute efficiency and availability. Graphical simulation interaction will require new real-time features; configuration and deployment tools will have to evolve to take into account the composability of software execution environments.

c) Exascale I/O and storage in the presence of multiple tiers of data storage: proposals should address exascale I/O systems expected to have multiple tiers of data storage technologies, including non-volatile memory. Fine grain data access prioritisation of processes and applications sharing data in these tiers is one of the goals as well as prioritisation applied to file/object creates/deletes. Runtime layers should combine data replication with data layout transformations relevant for HPC, in order to meet the needs for improved performance and resiliency. It is also desirable for the I/O subsystem to adaptively provide optimal performance or reliability especially in the presence of millions of processes simultaneously doing I/O. It is critical that programming system interoperability and standardised APIs are achieved. On the fly data management supporting data processing, taking into account multi-tiered storage and involving real time in situ/in transit processing should be addressed.

d) Supercomputing for Extreme Data and emerging HPC use modes: HPC architectures for real-time and in-situ data analytics are required to support the processing of large-scale and high velocity real-time data (e.g. sensor data, Internet of Things) together with large volumes of stored data (e.g. climate simulations, predictive models, etc.). The approaches should include support for real-time in-memory analysis of different data structures, direct processing of compressed data and appropriate benchmarking method for performance analysis. Interactive 3-D visualisation of large-scale data to allow users to explore large information spaces in 3-D and perform on-demand data analysis in real-time (e.g. large scale queries or analytics) should be addressed. Interactive supercomputing is required to execute complex workflows for urgent decision making in the field of critical clinical diagnostics, natural risks or spread of diseases; this implies adapting operational procedures of HPC infrastructures, developing efficient co-scheduling techniques or improving checkpoint/restart and extreme data management

e) Mathematics and algorithms for extreme scale HPC systems and applications working with extreme data: Specific issues are quantification of uncertainties and noise, multi-scale, multi-physics and extreme data. Mathematical methods, numerical analysis, algorithms and software engineering for extreme parallelism should be addressed. Novel and disruptive algorithmic strategies should be explored to minimize data movement as well as the number of communication and synchronization instances in extreme computing. Parallel-in-time methods may be investigated to boost parallelism of simulation codes across a wide range of application domains. Taking into account data-related uncertainties is essential for the acceptance of numerical simulation in decision making; a unified European VVUQ (Verification Validation and Uncertainty Quantification) package for Exascale computing should be provided by improving methodologies and solving problems limiting usability for very large computations on many-core configurations; access to the VVUQ techniques for the HPC community should be facilitated by providing software that is ready for deployment on supercomputers.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 2 and 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. Proposals should clearly indicate the subtopic which is their main focus. At least one project per subtopic will be funded.

Expected Impact:

  • Contribution to the realisation of the ETP4HPC Strategic Research Agenda, thus strengthened European research and industrial leadership in HPC technologies.
  • Successful transition to practical exascale computing for the addressed specific element of the HPC stack.
  • Covering important segments of the broader and/or emerging HPC markets, especially extreme-computing, emerging use modes and extreme-data HPC systems.
  • Impact on standards bodies and other relevant international research programmes and frameworks.
  • European excellence in mathematics and algorithms for extreme parallelism and extreme data applications to boost research and innovation in scientific areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, life sciences, materials, climate, geosciences, etc.

   

NMP+B    <<    ICT
EUB-02-2017IoT Pilotsd.l. 14-03-2017
Call H2020-EUB-2017
EU-Brazil Joint Call
Orçamento 8,00 M€
Specific Challenge: In order to make use of the rich potential of the Internet of Things (IoT) in real-world scenarios, technologies and tools developed so far need to be demonstrated in controlled environments with the ultimate goal of validation. Given the specific nature of this Call, widely replicable pilots are targeted in view of solving specific societal challenges, in the context of EU-Brazil cooperation.
Given the considerable amount of work carried out on M2M/IoT and Cyber Physical Systems architectures (e.g. IoT-A), platforms (e.g. FIWARE, CRYSTAL, SOFIA) and standards (e.g. oneM2M) over the last few years, pilots are encouraged to exploit this previous work where applicable. The goal is to further demonstrate the generic applicability of these architectures, platforms and standards and to identify where standards are missing or should evolve, as well as relevant pre-normative activities.
Pilots aim at validating IoT approaches to specific socio-economic challenges in real-life settings. Pilots' objectives include user acceptability, technology assessment and optimisation, business model validation, approaches to sustainability and replicability. They should be implemented through close cooperation between users and suppliers with the active involvement of relevant stakeholders on the demand side.

Scope: Research and Innovation Actions
IoT finds applicability in a broad range of industry, business and public services scenarios. Specific focus will be on implementing pilots incorporating the whole value-chain, and involving all relevant stakeholders, in particular end-users. Where relevant, institutional involvement may be appropriate.
The joint call would support three pilots each addressing a distinct area among the following areas of interest for EU-Brazil collaboration:  
•    Environmental monitoring  
Environmental and carbon footprint –as well as energy and water consumption- can be drastically reduced by an optimised management both along and across value-chains.Sensors can be used to measure and monitor a series of distinct environmental variables. The data collected across different areas can in turn be used for data analytics and decision-making. A pilot combining a system approach to integrate a large number of sensors across a large set of variables will test the acceptability and scalability of the selected IoT platform and test how to optimise results and reduce costs, as well as validating standards and interoperability.  
•    Utilities: smart water management
Smart water management can reduce leakages, optimise watering and irrigation and improve water consumption both in cities and for agricultural purposes.A pilot focusing on integrated solutions enabling real-time interconnection of heterogeneous sensors and actuators, geo-localisation and data fusion including data from meteorological forecast will test the acceptability and scalability of the selected IoT platform. High reliability and low maintenance costs are key parameters as well as the possibility to replicate the pilot in other locations.  
•    Utilities: energy management at home and in buildings      
A group of IoT use cases in the area of the residential smart grid that involve the use of a home energy management system (HEMS) that would exploit automation and self-learning capabilities to monitor and steer local energy consumption (electricity and carbon fuels) and generation. This includes the better steering of HVAC units according to thermostats, weather forecasts, dynamic electricity pricing, and availability of (locally) generated renewable energy.  
•    Smart assisted living and wellbeing  
A group of IoT use cases which use intelligent devices (e.g. wearables, sensors, smartphones, and intelligent home appliances) to autonomously generate reports on an individual's physical activity, overall vital signs and well-being. It allows the use and sharing of generated data for personal use or report to specific services (e.g. doctors, nurses, dieticians and sport coaches) through connected devices. It also enables "smart assisted living": the remote follow-up of vulnerable people (children, elderly, hospital patients, etc.) and the automated notification of emergency services, family, etc. when necessary.  
•    Smart manufacturing: customisation
A group of IoT use cases that enable the production of customised outputs. Such production systems combine the low unit costs of mass production processes with the flexibility of individual customisation. This includes:  
•    Continuous Additive Manufacturing;  
•    Flexible automation for robot manufacturing;  
•    Robot systems for additive manufacturing;  
•    Production of one-of-a-kind customer designs; and dynamic production systems and shop floors - mobile robot for efficient and flexible use in cleanrooms.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU up to EUR 1.5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately by three distinct projects. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. Three projects in three different areas are expected.

Expected Impact: Pilots should empower citizens, both in the public and private spheres, and businesses, as well as improve the associated public services where appropriate. Pilots are not only expected to validate technologies and architectures for a specific set of use cases requirements, but also the related business models to guarantee the sustainability of the approach. Security and privacy aspects relating to access to and processing of collected information need to be properly taken into consideration.
Improved sharing of information, approaches and solutions, as well as expertise through:  
•    pilots on both sides and across the Atlantic, involving end-users.  
•    establishing common benchmarks;  
•    contributing to standardisation and to open-source and open-data repositories  
•    linking with ongoing work in the IoT Focus Area.
 
Type of Action: Research and Innovation action
ICT-04-2017Smart Anything Everywhere Initiatived.l. 08-11-2016
Call H2020-ICT-2017-1 (subcall de: H2020-ICT-2017)
Information and Communication Technologies
Orçamento 233,50 M€
Specific Challenge: "Smart anything everywhere" stands for the next wave of products that integrate digital technology inside. A major challenge is to accelerate the design, development and uptake of advanced digital technologies by European industry, especially among them many SMEs and mid-caps in products that include innovative electronic components, software and systems .

Scope: a. Innovation Actions should address all of the following three aspects.  
i.    Establishing across Europe networks of multidisciplinary competence centres offering one-stop shops/marketplaces for companies that want to experiment with digital technologies inside their products. Centres should act as "innovation hubs" offering facilities (access to technology platforms) and services for developing innovative products, such as design, manufacturing, rapid prototyping and life-cycle management. They should also act as brokers between suppliers and users of technology products and solutions. Competence centres are encouraged to link to existing and emerging regional (smart specialisation) or national innovation hubs. If Horizon 2020 funding is complemented by ESIF or other regional or national funds, Horizon 2020 funding should be used for carrying out highly innovative experiments that will multiply the impact of local initiatives to a European scale, and will build partnerships between businesses in Europe.  
ii.    Carrying out a critical mass of cross-border experiments bringing together different key actors along the full value chain to customise the technologies according to the requirements of the users. Driven by the requirements of first-time users, Application Experiments bring together the actors of the value chain and the experts necessary to enable new users to develop novel products or services and assist them in customising and applying these in their respective environments. Alternatively competence centers could provide access to design and prototyping and small value production or a combination of the above. Experiment descriptions in proposals should include an outline of the initial exploitation plan and business scenario. To remain flexible on which experiments will be carried out and to stay flexible in fast moving markets, the action may involve financial support to third parties, in line with the conditions set out in part K of the General Annexes. The proposal will define the selection process of additional users and suppliers running the experiments for which financial support will be granted (typically in the order of EUR 20 000 – 100 000  per party). Maximum 50% of the EU funding can be allocated to financial support to third parties.  
iii.    Activities to achieve long-term sustainability of one-stop shop / market place services by the competence centres and the eco-system. This includes the development of a business plan for the competence centres and the marketplace, of which an outline business scenario should be described in the proposal. In addition, investors should be attracted to support business development of SMEs and mid-cap actors in successful experiments. Such activities would include also dissemination and support to exploitation. Among others, communication and dissemination activities shall make use of established networks reaching out to SMEs like the Enterprise Europe Network and the NCP network.
Innovation actions are expected to focus on one or more of the following four areas of technologies. Selected projects are expected to collaborate on building the European "Smart Anything Everywhere" ecosystem:  
•    Area 1: Cyber-physical and embedded systems: The goal is to help businesses from any sector uplift the quality and performance of their products and services with innovative embedded ICT components and systems and to support eco-system building for promising platforms developed in earlier R&I products.  
•    Area 2: Customised low energy computing powering CPS and the IoT: The goal is to help businesses who are developing products for situations where high computing capacity and low energy would be a competitive advantage and to support eco-system building for promising platforms developed in earlier low power computing projects.  
•    Area 3: Advanced micro-electronics components and Smart System Integration: The goal is to support electronic components, sensors, smart objects and systems (i) access  to advanced design and manufacturing for academia, research institutes and SMEs, and (ii) rapid prototyping targeting SMEs.  
•    Area 4: Organic and large area electronics: The goal is to help businesses in further maturing, innovating and validating their products with organic and large area electronics technologies. Focus is on i) access to design, technology and prototyping which are mature and ready to use, and ii) application experiments driven by concrete user requirements and business cases.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to 7 million would allow areas (1), (2) and (3) to be addressed appropriately. The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to 4.5 million would allow area (4) to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. At least one innovation action is supported for each area of technologies.
b. Coordination and Support actions
The aim is to reinforce the collaboration between the actions supported under this initiative, to increase the outreach of these actions and their impact and to achieve a wider coverage of stakeholders in technological, application, innovation, and geographic terms. Tasks and services should include maintaining a single innovation portal for newcomers; sharing of best practices and experiences; dissemination; identifying new innovative ICT technologies that can benefit from this scheme, brokering between users and suppliers; leveraging further investment by creating linkages with regional/national initiatives and by stimulating organic growth.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to 1 million would allow this area to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact: Proposals should address all of the following impact criteria, providing metrics to measure success when appropriate.  
•    Innovation in products, processes and business models leading to quantifiable increases in market shares and/or productivity of European companies and/or industrial capacities in Europe, notably for SMEs and mid-caps operating in non tech sectors.  
•    Business growth and increase competitiveness of digital technology suppliers, in particular SMEs, able to supply components and systems that may be integrated in various products.  
•    Creation of a self-sustainable ecosystem of innovation hubs including ICT suppliers and users supported by services available through a one stop shop, covering a large number of regions and their smart specialisation.

Type of Action: Innovation action, Coordination and support action
ICT-30-2017Photonics KET 2017d.l. 25-04-2017
Call H2020-ICT-2017-2 (subcall de: H2020-ICT-2017)
Information and Communication Technologies
Orçamento 392,00 M€
Specific Challenge: Investments in R&D&I are essential for reinforcing Europe's industrial competitiveness and leadership in photonic market sectors where Europe is strong (e.g. in communications, medical photonics, sensing) and to seize new opportunities. Europe also needs to strengthen its manufacturing base in photonics to safeguard the further potential for innovation and value creation and for job creation. We must better exploit the large enabling potential of photonics in many industrial sectors and in solutions addressing major societal challenges such as health and well-being, energy efficiency or safety. Finally, Europe needs to better exploit the innovation capacity of the photonics SMEs and the innovation leverage potential of the innovation clusters and national platforms.

Scope: a. Research and Innovation Actions
All R&I actions should demonstrate strong industrial commitment, be driven by user needs and concrete exploitation strategies, and they should cover the value/supply chain as appropriate. They should address manufacturability and include standardisation activities as appropriate. Focus is on one of the following themes:  
i.    Application driven core photonic technology developments for a new generation of photonic devices (including components, modules and sub-systems) for agile Petabit/s Optical Core and Metro Networks. The objective is to develop new photonic technologies for metro and core networks allowing capacities of Pb/s per node, and Tb/s per channel and 100 Tb/s per link over increased transport distances, while supporting network programmability features and fitting network operator requirements and roadmaps. Actions should include all new device developments for the envisaged network architecture. The action should also lead to network solutions with an energy consumption and equipment footprint reduction by more than 10 and a significant reduction in network cost. Actions may include system, network, control and security level aspects to the extent necessary for the action.  
ii.    Photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technology: The objective is to achieve major advances in chip integration technology, enabling a cost effective volume manufacturing of PICs with significantly enhanced performances (e.g. integration complexity, footprint, energy efficiency, speed, …) or new functions. Potential for such technology advances exists e.g. in selective area growth for multi-function integration, wider band-gap engineering, heterogeneous integration, wafer-scale electronic-photonic integration, the use of new materials, and in new approaches to small and efficient laser sources. Actions may address also the related design methodology and tools and the optimisation of materials, and should include a validation of results with fabricated PIC prototypes.  
iii.    Disruptive approaches to optical manufacturing by 2 and 3 D opto-structuring: The objective is to develop new optical manufacturing approaches for photonic components with unprecedented resolution (down to the submicron and nano-scale) or for functionalization of the surface of the materials to tailor and optimise their characteristics for a specific application. Actions may also address the related material. Novelty may be related for example to the laser source, to the optical system for light manipulation, to light-matter interaction or to the exploitation of quantum effects. Actions should include the validation of the manufacturing approach through a functional prototype of an application relevant device that goes clearly beyond the state of the art.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 6 and 8 million (for theme a.i), between EUR 3 and 4 million (for theme a.ii and a.iii) would allow these themes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. Minimum one action per theme will be selected.
b. Innovation Actions
Focus is on one of the following themes:
i. Innovation Incubator for SMEs
The objective is to reinforce the competitiveness of photonics and end-user industries, in particular SMEs, by providing them one-stop-shop access, supported through competence centres, to services and capabilities such as expertise, training, prototyping, design, engineering or pilot manufacturing services for first users and early adopters enabling the wider adoption and deployment of photonic technologies in innovative products. The service to be provided to the SME should be driven by its business needs and the implementation must be flexible and fast to better cope with the speed of innovation in ICT and the SME requirements.
Large projects are expected to achieve critical mass and to better exploit EU-added value. The action may involve financial support to third parties in line with the conditions set out in Part K of the General Annexes. The consortium will define the selection process of additional users and suppliers for which financial support will be granted (typically in the order of EUR 30.000 – 100.000  per party). A maximum of 50% of the EU funding requested by the proposal should be allocated to this purpose.
ii. Application driven core photonic devices integrated in systems: Actions should address validation and demonstration of photonic based systems for the target applications. Actions should also include standardisation activities. They should demonstrate strong industrial commitment, be driven by user needs and concrete business cases supported by strong exploitation strategies, and cover the whole value/supply chain and the end-user. Focus is on one of the following themes:  
1.    Biophotonics: imaging systems for in-depth disease diagnosis: The objective is the demonstration and validation in real-settings of innovative, easy to operate, compact, and non- or minimally invasive imaging systems to support diagnosis of age and life-style related diseases. The imaging system should either be label-free or be based on already/rapidly safety-approved labels. The feasibility and validity of the diagnostics approach should already have been demonstrated and it should potentially have a significant advantage with respect to current diagnostic approaches. The action should further develop, improve and assess the imaging system under a sufficient range of realistic conditions and disease profiles. The evaluation of its usability and applicability and its validation in clinical settings should be included.Actions should be driven by medical equipment manufacturers that are capable of and committed to the commercialisation of the solutions and include teams of physicians/clinicians to take part in the development and the functional and quantitative validation. Clinical trials are not covered by these actions and will normally take place after these actions.  
2.    Sensing for process and product monitoring and analysis: The prototyping and testing of new process analytical instrumentation for on-line/in-line control, targeting the food and pharmaceutical industry, based on compact and miniaturized photonics sensors that include novel key photonics components and modules. This new instrumentation should show significant improvements beyond the state of the art in sensitivity, specificity, long term stability (including calibration stability), high measurement rate, and reliability. Instruments should have self-testing/-monitoring functionalities and on-site calibration capabilities. The significant advantages compared to conventional sensors in terms of performance or cost, as appropriate, have to be demonstrated in a specific industrial application for monitoring product quality in real settings.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 8 and 10 million (for theme b.i) and between 6 and 8 million (for theme b.ii) would allow these themes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. Minimum one action per theme will be selected.
c. Coordination and Support actions
Supporting the industrial strategy for photonics in Europe: the objective is to support the development and implementation of a comprehensive industrial strategy for photonics in Europe. The action should include the development of strategic technology road-maps, strong stakeholder engagement (in particular Photonics21 stakeholders, National Technology Platforms, regional Clusters, end-user industries), coordination of regional, national and European strategies and priorities, and development of financial models and financial engineering to facilitate access to different sources of financing.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 3 million would allow this theme to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. No more than one action will be funded.

Expected Impact
: Proposals should describe how the proposed work will contribute to the listed corresponding expected impacts and should provide metrics, the baseline and concrete targets.
a. Research and Innovation Actions
i. Agile Petabit/s Optical Core and Metro Networks  
•    next generation agile, high-capacity and energy efficient core and metro networks to support the highly connected and communicating society;  
•    Secured industrial leadership in optical communications systems for core and metro networks and reinforcing the full value chain in Europe.
ii. Photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technology  
•    Industrial volume manufacturing in Europe of PICs with significant competitive advantages in cost/performance and with reduced development costs;  
•    New or significantly enhanced integration technology platforms for a more competitive European photonic industry.
iii. Disruptive approaches to optical manufacturing by 2 and 3 D opto-structuring  
•    Technology leadership in optical manufacturing of 2 and 3 D opto-structuring;  
•    Emergence of innovative optical components or material for specific applications.
b. Innovation Actions
i. An Innovation Incubator for SMEs  
•    Broader and faster take-up of photonics in innovative products, in particular by SMEs.
ii.1. Biophotonics: imaging systems for in-depth disease diagnosis  
•    Substantially improved and wider deployed in-depth diagnosis, and more effective treatment of age and life-style related diseases; 
•    increased market presence in the Diagnostic and Analysis Imaging Systems and increased European competitiveness of the medical equipment industry.
ii.2. Sensing for process and product monitoring and analysis  
•    Increased process monitoring efficiency in the food and pharmaceutical industries and reduction of waste along the logistic food and drugs chain;  
•    Increased competitiveness of the European process and product monitoring equipment industry.
c. Coordination and Support actions   
•    Reinforced value chains and deployment of photonics technologies by stronger cooperation of photonics stakeholders, clusters and end-users;  
•    Increased competitiveness of the European photonics sector and improved access to risk finance for the photonics sector in Europe.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action, Innovation action, Coordination and support action
ICT-31-2017Micro- and nanoelectronics technologiesd.l. 25-04-2017
Call H2020-ICT-2017-2 (subcall de: H2020-ICT-2017)
Information and Communication Technologies
Orçamento 392,00 M€
Specific Challenge: While the state-of-the-art micro/nano-electronics technologies and their manufacturing are being further advanced towards market-readiness in the context of the ECSEL Joint Undertaking, it is essential to prepare for the future of the electronics industry the next wave of industry-relevant technologies to extend the limits (technological and/or economic) mainstream technologies will be facing in the medium term . This is essential to maintain and increase Europe's longer-term capacity in the design and manufacturing of these technologies and to strengthen the competitiveness and market leadership of the many industries innovating through these technologies.

Scope: a. Research and Innovation actions
The work must be in the scope of one of the following topics:  
•    the development of new approaches to scale functional performance of information processing and storage substantially beyond the state-of-the-art technologies with a focus on ultra-low power and high performance. Work may address materials, processes, device and component architectures, system micro-architectures (processor and memory), security, design, modelling, simulation and nano-characterization, and must consider integration, systemability and manufacturability. Technologies exploiting the quantum effects in solid-state devices are also relevant. Advanced explorative technology development at TRL 2-3 is called for.  
•    3D sequential integration (at transistor scale) possibly mixed with 3D parallel integration (at circuit level) for system solutions to increase functionalities and capabilities. Work could address interconnects (intra-layer and vertical structures), design challenges (3D design kits and tools, power models and optimization), prototyping and test methods. Proposals at TRL 2-3 are called for.
In line with the strategy for EU international cooperation in H2020, cooperation is encouraged with countries that have substantial research in the area (e.g. Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and the USA).
In the particular case of Japan and Korea, the call is open to project twinning. Proposals for twinning with entities participating in projects funded by Research and Innovation programmes in Japan and Korea shall foresee budget provisions to exchange knowledge and experience and exploit synergies. Project twinning will be implemented on a bilateral basis by clustering of projects on nanoelectronics topics of mutual interest.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 2 and 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.
b. Innovation action
In Equipment Assessment Experiments, suppliers of innovative high-tech equipment install, assess and validate their prototypes or products that have left the R&D phase in environments that are very close to real-life conditions in cooperation with end-user. Proposals at TRL 6-7 are called for.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.
c. Coordination and Support actions
In view of promoting the attractiveness of careers in micro/nanoelectronics towards young people, a dedicated pan-European challenge event should be proposed to showcase the possibilities offered by state-of-the-art hardware technologies (similar to the European code week for software apps). The sustainability of this event should also be addressed.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of about EUR 0.5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact: Proposals should address the following impact criteria and provide metrics to measure and monitor success
a. Research and Innovation actions
The actions will aim at contributing to the future growth in Europe of the micro-/nanoelectronics and related industries.  
•    The proposals must describe how the proposed developments of new/enabling technologies will contribute to the target of doubling the economic value of semiconductor component production in Europe within the next 10 years as set by the Electronics Leaders Group in their strategic roadmap  and implementation plan .  
•    The proposals must outline a realistic roadmap for further progressing on the TRL range beyond the project timeframe and a concrete business perspective describing expected markets for the industrial partners and impact for European industry and society at large.
b. Innovation actions  
•    Proposals should clearly demonstrate the route from assessment to first use of the equipment. The user requirements of the equipment to be assessed should represent significant improvements to existing equipment in terms of capability, precision, efficiency or other characteristics opening new avenues of deployment.
c. Coordination and Support actions  
•    The actions will raise the awareness of young people for the potential offered by a technological career thereby attracting more students to the field.  
•    The proposed event should have ambitious targets in the number of participations (reach-out to thousands of students) and the scope of the activities (designs and prototypes) to be showcased.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action, Innovation action, Coordination and support action

   

NMP+B    <<    Bio Economia
SFS-35-2017Innovative solutions for sustainable food packagingd.l. 14-02-2017
Call H2020-SFS-2017-1 (subcall de: H2020-SFS-2016-2017)
SUSTAINABLE FOOD SECURITY – RESILIENT AND RESOURCE-EFFICIENT VALUE CHAINS
Orçamento 85,00 M€

Specific ChallengeIn recent decades, there has been much research into innovative food packaging technologies and solutions (e.g. active, intelligent, recyclable, easy-to-use, organic, antibacterial). This includes research aimed at reducing the environmental footprint of packaging material, increasing the shelf-life of food and developing food spoilage indicators, improving product design, optimising process efficiency, and reducing the need for chemical preservatives while maintaining the nutritional and sensorial properties of food. In spite of the progress made, much remains to be done to overcome the barriers to market uptake of many promising technologies.

ScopeProposals should clearly address the problems associated with the scaling-up and commercialisation of eco-innovative solutions to packaging in a developing framework of social, economic and environmental conditions. Activities should aim to produce plans and arrangements or designs for new, modified or improved products, processes or services. For this purpose they may include prototyping, testing, demonstrating, pilot projects, large-scale product validation and market replication. Proposals may, if necessary, include limited research and development activities. If there are clear market failures or cultural or behavioural barriers to overcome, proposals may comprise activities such as validating the benefits for users/buyers, validating technical and economic performance at system level, validating standards, and activities to prepare market uptake, ensure consumer acceptance and optimise access to and the dissemination of results. Work is expected to benefit from contribution of social sciences and a gender approach. Participation of all relevant stakeholders in the food production and supply chains is encouraged. Demonstration activities will require the involvement of packaging and food processing companies, retailers and civil society organisations to bridge the gap between ideas that have been developed and their practical implementation.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 6 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude the submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected ImpactWith a view to supporting the transition from a linear to a circular economy, proposals should show how some, or all, of the following impacts will be achieved:

wider and faster deployment of innovative, user-driven, packaging solutions resulting from greater industry and consumer acceptance, and higher visibility of innovative solutions, overcoming the barriers to market uptake.

  • reduced waste in both food and packaging materials, and its negative impacts on the environment (e.g. resource utilisation, greenhouse gas emissions, pollution).
  • strengthening of the EU's position in manufacturing, improving competitiveness as well as opportunities for growth, diversification and job creation for the EU food and packaging sector in general, and SMEs in particular.
  • strengthening the European food value chain through continued support to product quality, contributing to consumer trust and increased consumption.
  • support for the transition from a linear to a circular economy.

Type of action: Innovation action

   

NMP+B    <<    Energia
EE-11-2016Overcoming market barriers and promoting deep renovation of buildingsd.l. 15-09-2016
Call H2020-EE-2016-CSA
CALL ENERGY EFFICIENCY
Orçamento 38,00 M€

Buildings

Specific Challenge:

In order to achieve the EU 2020 energy efficiency objectives, the renovation rate needs to increase from the present level of 1.2% per annum to at least 2-3% (with a specific target for the public sector of 3%) and the energy performance of renovations needs to improve. Both the Energy Performance in Buildings Directive (EPBD) and the Energy Efficiency Directive (EED) contain several provisions in this respect. The environmental sustainability of renovation process but more importantly, the health and wellbeing of the occupants are also relevant. This might lead to consideration of aspects partially covered by different pieces of EU legislation such as REACH, the Water Framework Directive[[2000/60/EC (EU Water Framework Directive) http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32000L0060]], the Construction Products Regulation[[Construction Products Regulation (EU 305/2011) http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2011:088:0005:0043:EN:PDF]], etc.

Many barriers, which are not necessarily technological, hamper the implementation of these provisions. For example: diversity and fragmentation within the building value chain; inefficient and complex renovation processes; a lack of deep renovation packages; low development and uptake of financial packages or incentives (e.g. grants, credits); unclear energy or environmental requirements in renovation grants or procurement processes; low progress in performance guarantees. There is therefore, a need to overcome these regulatory and non-regulatory barriers to facilitate the renovation of existing building stocks.

Scope:

The focus of submitted proposals should be aiming at overcoming market barriers to deep renovation within the value chain. Any building type may be included (public or private, residential or non-residential).

Renovations can take place at one point in time or be staged in a step-by-step approach, but in any case they should strive to achieve "deep renovation" (at least 60% energy savings compared to pre-renovation levels) or aim towards Nearly Zero Energy Buildings (NZEB) performance. Proposals might consider integration of voluntary certification schemes along with energy performance certificate, including elements of indoor quality classification for buildings.

Proposals should address at least two of the following options (list not exhaustive):

  • Support to consumers or end-users
  • Support the implementation of renovation road maps resulting from the EED/EPBD
  • Address the gap between designed and actual energy performance; support reliable energy performance standards, quality of certification and labelling schemes, etc.
  • Increase the number of deep renovations by means of :
    • Solutions that offer affordable deep renovation to a large number of individual consumers (e.g. owners or end-users) and/or
    • Targeting large groups of building units in order to take advantage of opportunities for simplification and cost reduction and the potential for further replication.
  • Support the use of existing financial mechanisms, instruments and innovative business models to address market failures, in particular split incentives.

The proposals should build on previous experience, including the outcome of Intelligent Energy Europe projects.

Synergies may be considered with activities initiated under the topic LCE-17-2017.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Depending on the options chosen to address in the Scope, proposals are expected to demonstrate the impacts listed below in the participant countries (wherever possible, using quantified indicators and targets):

  • Increased rate of renovation in the targeted area or sector (local, regional or national; public or private; residential; non-residential);
  • Increased number of individual deep renovations (exceeding 60% energy savings compared to pre-renovation levels);
  • Energy savings and renewable energy triggered through deep renovations;
  • Increased compliance rate in deep renovations;
  • Improved environmental sustainability of deep renovation solutions.
EE-13-2016Cost reduction of new Nearly Zero-Energy buildingsd.l. 15-09-2016
Call H2020-EE-2016-CSA
CALL ENERGY EFFICIENCY
Orçamento 38,00 M€

Buildings

Specific Challenge:

According to Article 9 of the Energy Performance Buildings Directive (EPBD), Member States shall ensure that by the end of 2020 (2018 for public buildings), all new buildings are Nearly Zero-Energy Buildings (NZEB). However, progress is slower than expected and requires the development of market ready cost reduction solutions. Cost-effective integration of renewable energy production elements into NZEB in a form that fits with the construction industry’s design and procurement process is a major challenge. Widespread application and roll out of means for cost effective development of NZEB would accelerate the market. The significant cost reduction that is required to mainstream NZEB by 2018 is likely to revolve around processes rather than technologies. There is an additional need to look beyond NZEB performance with a longer term perspective. Support is also needed to ensure that end users and occupants appreciate the role they play in the building's energy performance.

Scope:

Proposals should focus on reducing the cost of designing and constructing new NZEB in order to increase their market uptake. Proposals should explore how improved performance beyond the NZEB level can be reached whilst maintaining an overall focus on cost reduction.

Proposals should explore the cost-effective ways in which renewable energy generation elements can be integrated into NZEB, either on-site or nearby through district solutions. Proposals could take into account the ways in which these buildings can interact with each other at the district level. Proposals could additionally explore and monitor solutions that improve the end user's experience of these buildings, and which would contribute to greater public acceptance of the need to reduce energy consumption in buildings.

Cost reduction and energy savings should apply to the whole life-cycle of the building. This challenge addresses the whole of the construction process, including inception, planning, design, pre-fabrication, on-site operations and post-construction reviews. Proposals could address one or more aspects of the whole process.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Proposals are expected to demonstrate the impacts listed below, using quantified indicators and targets wherever possible:

  • Measurable reduction of construction-related costs compared to the current cost of a new conventional building that meets current building regulations;
  • Measurable nearly zero (or beyond) energy consumption (including on-site or nearby renewable energy sources) and nearly zero impact of materials used over the whole life cycle;
  • Demonstration of co-benefits which can have an impact on the real estate value of such buildings and on living/occupancy standards.
EE-14-2016Construction skillsd.l. 15-09-2016
Call H2020-EE-2016-CSA
CALL ENERGY EFFICIENCY
Orçamento 38,00 M€

Buildings

Specific Challenge:

In order to reach the EU's energy and climate targets, a qualified building workforce is needed. Improving the skills of middle and senior level professionals and blue collar workers in the area of sustainable energy efficient construction is therefore of key importance. This should be done throughout the entire value chain of the buildings sector. Professionals and blue collar workers also need to be aware of new upcoming challenges relating to nearly-zero energy buildings (for example new materials and, products; the integration of renewable energy sources; new systems or processes such as standardisation and common voluntary certification of buildings and use of Building Information Modelling (BIM) tools, etc.).

Scope:

The focus of submitted proposals shall be on upgrading or setting up large-scale qualification and training schemes. Proposals are to address coordination and accompanying measures (e.g. voluntary certification schemes, accreditation, mutual recognition, incentives to encourage the participation of craftsmen, sustainability of the schemes, etc.). Running training actions will not be in the scope of the proposal. Proposals may also focus on setting up a mutual recognition scheme of qualifications and certifications among different Member States. Proposals should include a strategy to ensure that qualification and training schemes are sustained after the end of the project. For financial support to trainees, proposals should link to other sources of funding available at national level such as the European Social Fund, including the Youth Guarantee Scheme.

The objective is to increase the number of skilled building professionals and/or blue collar workers across the building value chain (designers, architects, engineers, building managers, technicians, blue collar workers including apprentices, and other building professionals) with a specific focus on the engagement of SMEs. Training schemes can also consider operation and maintenance activities. Ultimately, the aim is to improve the overall quality of renovations and new constructions, to accelerate the renovation rate and to ensure proper interactions between different trades and professions. The submitted proposals need to be focused and are not necessarily required to address the whole range of professions and crafts involved in the building sector.

Proposals should take note of the BUILD UP Skills initiative, in particular the strong links with National Qualification Platforms and the implementation of the recommendations of the national qualification Roadmaps, and taking into account the European Qualifications Framework (EQF). They could also be developed with consideration to Erasmus+ actions and in particular the Sector Skills Alliances, which are focused on vocational training. Proposals should develop and roll-out appropriate certification and accreditation schemes to continuously improve knowledge and skills of the building workforce and to increase the quality of construction.

Proposals should focus on improved multidisciplinary approaches and understanding across different trades, for example using BIM, and involving Open BIM initiatives at the national level. They should also focus on improved appreciation of the end user's needs including the quality of indoor environment (thermal and visual comfort, acoustics, air quality, etc.) and improved operation and maintenance. Proposals may include the entire design chain (e.g. manufacturers) and material life cycles and embodied energy in the required skills.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 0.5 and 1 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Proposals are expected to demonstrate the impacts listed below, using quantified indicators and targets wherever possible:

  • Creation and implementation of sustainable qualification and training schemes for building professionals and/or blue collar workers;
  • Plans for sustainability after the project's life and replication across the EU,
  • Increase in the number of skilled workers (building professionals and/or blue collar workers);
  • Improved collaboration and understanding across different trades and professional groups;
  • Demonstrated reduction in the gap between designed and actual energy performance through improved quality of construction in specific projects;
  • Measurable energy savings and/or renewable energy production resulting from improved skills;
  • Improved market recognition of skills in the building sector (industry standards).
EE-16-2016Effective implementation of EU product efficiency legislationd.l. 15-09-2016
Call H2020-EE-2016-CSA
CALL ENERGY EFFICIENCY
Orçamento 38,00 M€

Industry, Services and Products

Specific Challenge:

By 2020 full implementation of the EU product efficiency legislation should be one of the most important contributions to the EU energy efficiency target. The Ecodesign Directive alone should yield yearly savings of up to 600 TWh of electricity and 600 TWh of heat in 2020, as well as net savings for European consumers and businesses of €90 billion per year – 1% of EU’s current GDP – in year 2020 (meaning net savings of €465 per household per year). Non-compliance with these rules is estimated to reduce these savings by at least 10%. Previous initiatives have demonstrated the usefulness of market surveillance activities. However to ensure full implementation of product efficiency legislation, these activities should be improved.

The enforcement of energy efficient products regulations should also take into account other relevant environmental impacts (e.g. emissions, noise) in order not to adversely influence peoples’ quality of life.

The challenge is thus to:

  • improve market surveillance activities.

Scope
:

Provide support for joint surveillance actions that focus on building up the monitoring, verification and enforcement of the EU's energy-related products policy, in particular for those products that represent the highest energy saving potential (e.g. electric motors, water and space heating and cooling equipment, lighting) or those newly regulated products that represent new challenges for market surveillance because of the size and complexity of the products (e.g. power transformers, professional refrigerating and freezing equipment, large industrial products).

Proposals should focus on building up the monitoring, verification and enforcement of the EU's energy-related products policy, in particular for those products that represent the highest energy saving potential and with lower compliance rates or those regulated products that represent new challenges for market surveillance and therefore may require new approaches and methods for monitoring, verification and enforcement. Proposals should support higher level of surveillance activities and go beyond product testing. They should not replace activities that are under the responsibility of Member States, but should add European value to them (e.g. execution of joint activities, exchange of information, development of common methods, protocols or checklists, etc.). Actions must include the relevant market surveillance authorities[[The market surveillance authorities are the authorities of the Member States responsible for enforcement of ecodesign, energy labelling and labelling of tyres regulations, appointed in accordance with Regulation (EC) No 765/2008 of the European Parliament and the Council]] at least one per participating country, in their consortia. Actions should also involve consumers’ (or other end users') associations as appropriate, and demonstrate a high transnational added value. Actions should take stock of previous EU-funded work on monitoring, verification and enforcement, combining and leveraging relevant results to a much wider audience across the EU.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Proposed actions are expected to demonstrate the impacts listed below (wherever possible, use quantified indicators and targets), depending on the scope of the proposal:

  • Primary energy savings triggered by the project (in GWh/year per million Euro of EU funding) corresponding to the energy losses avoided from non-compliance;
  • Increase of confidence among purchasers, manufacturers and retailers;
  • Contribution to the enforcement of EU product legislation.
EE-11-2017Overcoming market barriers and promoting deep renovation of buildingsd.l. 07-06-2017
Call H2020-EE-2017-CSA-PPI (subcall de: H2020-EE-2017)
CALL ENERGY EFFICIENCY
Orçamento 55,00 M€
Specific Challenge: In order to achieve the EU 2020 energy efficiency objectives, the renovation rate needs to increase from the present level of 1.2% per annum to at least 2-3% (with a specific target for the public sector of 3%) and the energy performance of renovations needs to improve. Both the Energy Performance in Buildings Directive (EPBD) and the Energy Efficiency Directive (EED) contain several provisions in this respect. The environmental sustainability of renovation process but more importantly, the health and wellbeing of the occupants are also relevant. This might lead to consideration of aspects partially covered by different pieces of EU legislation such as REACH, the Water Framework Directive , the Construction Products Regulation , etc.
Many barriers, which are not necessarily technological, hamper the implementation of these provisions. For example: diversity and fragmentation within the building value chain; inefficient and complex renovation processes; a lack of deep renovation packages; low development and uptake of financial packages or incentives (e.g. grants, credits); unclear energy or environmental requirements in renovation grants or procurement processes; low progress in performance guarantees. There is therefore, a need to overcome these regulatory and non-regulatory barriers to facilitate the renovation of existing building stocks.

Scope: The focus of submitted proposals should be aiming at overcoming market barriers to deep renovation within the value chain. Any building type may be included (public or private, residential or non-residential).
Renovations can take place at one point in time or be staged in a step-by-step approach, but in any case they should strive to achieve "deep renovation" (at least 60% energy savings compared to pre-renovation levels) or aim towards Nearly Zero Energy Buildings (NZEB) performance. Proposals might consider integration of voluntary certification schemes along with energy performance certificate, including elements of indoor quality classification for buildings.
Proposals should address at least two of the following options (list not exhaustive):  
•    Support to consumers or end-users  
•    Support the implementation of renovation road maps resulting from the EED/EPBD  
•    Address the gap between designed and actual energy performance; support reliable energy performance standards, quality of certification and labelling schemes, etc.  
•    Increase the number of deep renovations by means of :          
o    Solutions that offer affordable deep renovation to a large number of individual consumers (e.g. owners or end-users) and/or    
o    Targeting large groups of building units in order to take advantage of opportunities for simplification and cost reduction and the potential for further replication.   
•    Support the use of existing financial mechanisms, instruments and innovative business models to address market failures, in particular split incentives.
The proposals should build on previous experience, including the outcome of Intelligent Energy Europe projects.
Synergies may be considered with activities initiated under the topic LCE-17-2017.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact: Depending on the options chosen to address in the Scope, proposals are expected to demonstrate the impacts listed below in the participant countries (wherever possible, using quantified indicators and targets):  
•    Increased rate of renovation in the targeted area or sector (local, regional or national; public or private; residential; non-residential);  
•    Increased number of individual deep renovations (exceeding 60% energy savings compared to pre-renovation levels);  
•    Energy savings and renewable energy triggered through deep renovations;  
•    Increased compliance rate in deep renovations;  
•    Improved environmental sustainability of deep renovation solutions.

Type of Action: Coordination and support action

EE-19-2017Public Procurement of Innovative Solutions for energy efficiencyd.l. 07-06-2017
Call H2020-EE-2017-CSA-PPI (subcall de: H2020-EE-2017)
CALL ENERGY EFFICIENCY
Orçamento 55,00 M€
Specific Challenge: Considering the large volume of public spending (19% of EU GDP, or roughly EUR 2,200 billion in 2009), the public sector constitute an important driver to stimulate market transformation towards more sustainable energy-related products and services. The Energy Efficiency Directive requires that central governments purchase only products, services and buildings with high energy-efficiency performance. Public Procurement of Innovative solutions (PPI) is not sufficiently developed in the field of energy efficiency although it could support the market up-take of energy efficient goods, buildings or services.

Scope: Actions enabling a group of procurers (buyers group) to undertake a PPI procurement for innovative solutions for, products, services buildings (NZEB, renovation) which are not yet available on a large-scale commercial basis, and which have energy performance levels that are better than the best levels available on the market. The innovative solutions procured by all procurers in the buyers group must have the same core functionality and performance characteristics, but may have additional 'local' functionality due to differences in the local context of each individual procurer. Actions should lead to the first application / commercialisation of the innovative solution, in order to assure its market uptake. Functional/performance based specifications should be ambitious but achievable without the procurement of research and development and without distorting competition. Where appropriate, proposals should build upon the outputs of ongoing projects (including the Project Development Assistance projects), networks, guides, tools, and rely on the use of cost – benefit analysis (e.g. using a life- cycle approach). Proposals may use the Procurement of Innovation Platform supported by the European Commission. The procurement of innovation process should be associated with coordination and networking activities that embed the PPI into a wider set of demand side activities, including the removal of marked barriers (e.g. lack of knowledge, practical training, tailored guidelines and legal uncertainties) and awareness and knowledge sharing activities. Other entities (e.g. end-users, certification bodies, private/NGO procurers that provide services of public interest and share the same procurement need) whose participation is well justified may participate in additional activities that clearly add value to the action. Proposals should include a clear action plan to communicate experiences and results towards potential replicators across the EU.
Applicants should refer to the part D and E of the General Annexes to this Work Programme.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. The funding rate for Public Procurement of Innovative Solutions (PPI) actions is limited to 35% of the total eligible costs (PPI is procurement for the purchase

Expected Impact: For PPI actions, proposals are expected to demonstrate the impacts listed below (wherever possible, use quantified indicators and targets):   
•    Prepare and implement the PPI procurement and PPI contracts within the timeframe of the project to ensure the first application / commercialisation of the innovative solutions.  
•    Energy performance levels of new buildings should be at least 25% better than current regulations or reach NZEB performance levels. For existing buildings, energy savings of at least 60% compared to the existing building should be reached, using innovative solutions. Products and services, should demonstrate at least 25% better performance in terms of energy efficiency than the available performance levels. 

Type of Action: Public Procurement of Innovative solutions
EE-12-2017Integration of Demand Response in Energy Management Systems while ensuring interoperability through Public Private Partnership (EeB PPP)d.l. 19-01-2017
Call H2020-EE-2017-IA (subcall de: H2020-EE-2017)
CALL ENERGY EFFICIENCY
Orçamento 49,00 M€

Specific Challenge: The control, automation and monitoring tools that can be integrated into buildings are becoming more and more sophisticated. In order to guarantee energy efficient operation, building service systems need to deliver adequate control and monitoring of building energy parameters. It is essential to develop and demonstrate interoperable energy automation, control and monitoring tools for efficient heating, domestic hot water, ventilation, cooling, lighting, shading, storage, energy generation, and other building systems while ensuring a high quality indoor environment. This includes the investigation of demand response and energy management of individual customers as well.

The challenge is to integrate demand response enabling elements into Energy Management Systems and thus create 'building – energy system interaction' towards optimising, at building level, energy consumption, production and storage considering the availability and price of energy supplied via the grid. A specific challenge is that Energy Management Systems and smart home devices are often not interoperable but are linked to a certain brand, technology and/or standard. Therefore full interoperability between grids, systems and products for seamless integration of all required components in building energy management systems is crucial.

Scope: At the building and building unit level (residential or non-residential) the focus should be on optimisation, integration and demonstration of cost effective and interoperable solutions, including testing of new technologies and systems in real life situations.

The proposed solutions shall be demonstrated for buildings which incorporate intelligent Energy Management Systems and new technologies (smart home devices). They should ensure interoperability, evolving and adapting to the operational environment (self-learning), including indoor and outdoor conditions, the availability of energy from local RES generation, the availability and price of energy from grids and local energy storage capacities. Also the possibility of clustering individual demand response services, self-generation and storage at district level should be considered. Such solutions should be effective and resilient, ensuring low operational and maintenance costs and could include functions for predictive maintenance. Solutions should be compatible and appropriately integrated with smart grids via open standards, taking into account existing standards as well as standards under development. The proposed activities should clearly involve and engage building occupants, helping them to become an interactive part of the demand response solution, as well as better managing their energy demand. Proposals should involve energy suppliers (DSOs) and industrial technology suppliers.

The topic EUB-02-2017 ("Utilities: energy management at home and in buildings") in Part 5.i Information and Communication Technologies of the Work Programme is also relevant and addresses similar challenges.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 3 and 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

This topic will be implemented under the PPP on Energy-efficient Buildings. The activities are expected to be implemented at Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6-8 (please see part G of the General Annexes).

Expected Impact: Proposals are expected to demonstrate the impacts listed below, using quantified indicators and targets wherever possible:  

•Facilitate the deployment of solutions that would improve demand response in buildings.  

•Real time optimisation of energy demand and supply integrating demand-response into intelligent building energy management systems and/or other systems.  

•High replicability across the EU.  

•Energy cost savings through integrated home automation solutions.  

•Higher indoor environmental quality and adaptability to external conditions, leading to improved comfort and living standards, while optimising energy consumption. 

Type of Action: Innovation action


LCE-09-2016Increasing the competitiveness of the EU PV manufacturing industryd.l. 08-09-2016
Call H2020-LCE-2016-4 (subcall de: H2020-LCE-2016-2017)
CALL FOR COMPETITIVE LOW-CARBON ENERGY
Orçamento 85,00 M€

Renewable Energy Technologies

Specific Challenge:

The European PV manufacturing industry has faced strong foreign competition in the last years, which has led to a dramatic reduction of its production capacity. The challenge is to develop innovative manufacturing solutions that substantially improve competitiveness of the European PV manufacturing industry and help regain a part of the potentially increasing worldwide PV market, while creating more secure and sustainable supply chains for the European PV market

Scope:

Demonstrating manufacturing innovation and scale-up of highly performing PV technologies at pilot-line level, targeting GW-scale, high-yield throughput and cost-effective industrial production of cells and modules.

Applications for Innovation Actions (bringing the technology from TRL 5-6 to 6-7) are invited (please see part G of the General Annexes).

Opening the project's test sites, pilot and demonstration facilities, or research infrastructures for practice oriented education, training or knowledge exchange is encouraged.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 10 to 15 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts

Expected Impact:

Trigger new investments in the European PV industry, via the establishment of pilot lines which target innovative/optimised production processes and/or tailored development of equipment for mainstream PV technologies at the state of the art of research, and show the potential for cost and performance competitiveness of the final product.

LCE-13-2016Solutions for reduced maintenance, increased reliability and extended life-time of off-shore wind turbines/farmsd.l. 08-09-2016
Call H2020-LCE-2016-4 (subcall de: H2020-LCE-2016-2017)
CALL FOR COMPETITIVE LOW-CARBON ENERGY
Orçamento 85,00 M€

Renewable Energy Technologies

Specific Challenge:

The challenge is to achieve a very substantial reduction in Operation and Maintenance (O&M) costs through new O&M and control concepts, including logistics planning, decision making and operation, providing an optimized balance between maximizing generation and minimizing loads on the turbines, and reducing the number of inspections and repairs with more remote monitoring and operations.

Scope:

Offshore wind turbines, both fixed bottom and floating, are subject to high loads in form of vibrations from wind and waves, as well as from rotation of the turbines. The focus is to reduce the need for maintenance of wind turbines/farms and to develop measures for life-time extension, demonstrating innovative solutions and tools, and thereby the levelised cost of wind energy. The action can include the development of tools for doing predictive maintenance, hereunder models of component/soil degradation, and establishment a database with operational and failure data for validation of tools. The actions should consider not only the wind turbines but also the substructure and the soil conditions.

Participation of wind turbine manufacturers and large wind farm operators is expected.

TRL 7 shall be achieved at the end of project activities (please see part G of the General Annexes).

Opening the project's test sites, pilot and demonstration facilities, or research infrastructures for practice oriented education, training or knowledge exchange is encouraged.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 7 to 10 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts

Expected Impact:

The action will result in the reduction of component failure and increased reliability. The development of innovative solutions and tools will result in more reliable wind turbines and plants. It is expected that the output of the project will significantly contribute to an improved performance for new and operating off-shore wind power plants and therefore to the cost of energy. Presented tools and solutions might have an exploitation potential in the onshore wind sector. The action should contribute to the strengthening the European industrial technology base, thereby creating growth and jobs in Europe.

LCE-10-2017Reducing the cost of PV electricityd.l. 07-09-2017
Call H2020-LCE-2017-5 (subcall de: H2020-LCE-2016-2017)
CALL FOR COMPETITIVE LOW-CARBON ENERGY
Orçamento 112,50 M€
Specific Challenge: Much of the R&D efforts in recent years have focused on the development of high-efficiency PV cells at low cost. However, the cost of a PV system also depends on a number of other elements and components. The reduction of their cost and the enhancement of their performance show ample margins for improvement and can considerably help reducing price and accelerating large-scale deployment of PV installations; however this still represents a challenge.

Scope: Proposals are requested to address the reduction of the cost of PV electricity by optimising the PV system energy yield and lifetime and decreasing cost at module (encapsulation materials, glass, and antireflective layers, anti-soiling layers, module architecture, etc.), balance-of-system component (electronics, inverters, tracking systems, etc.) or system configuration levels.
Applications for Innovation Actions (bringing the technology from TRL 5-6 to 6-7) are invited (please see part G of the General Annexes).
Opening the project's test sites, pilot and demonstration facilities, or research infrastructures for practice oriented education, training or knowledge exchange is encouraged.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 7 to 10 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact: For a given technology, demonstration of cost-effective solutions (expressed by a considerable reduction of cost per kWh) with increased energy yields at module/system level (under standard as well as actual operating conditions). Solutions are also expected to contribute to reduce energy payback time for the PV system and, when applicable, to increase lifetime. At module level, solutions should show increased cost effectiveness for recycling.

Type of Action: Innovation action
LCE-17-2017Easier to install and more efficient geothermal systems for retrofitting buildingsd.l. 07-09-2017
Call H2020-LCE-2017-5 (subcall de: H2020-LCE-2016-2017)
CALL FOR COMPETITIVE LOW-CARBON ENERGY
Orçamento 112,50 M€
Specific Challenge: The cost and efficiency of existing geothermal systems, mostly based on vertical wells, to provide heating and cooling in buildings being retrofitted or renovated are not very competitive in particular when digging is difficult. The challenge is to demonstrate the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of geothermal systems for heating and cooling in individual installations being retrofitted.

Scope: Proposals shall target easy to install and efficient underground coupling systems for retrofitting existing types of buildings or adaptable to existing types of buildings, including historical buildings, to make geothermal energy a standard source of heat and cold in building renovation. The difficulties in drilling in built environments must be taken into consideration and properly addressed. Proposals might address the need for improved and more cost-efficient heat pumps to optimize the use of the energy generated by the proposed geothermal system. Synergies may be considered with activities initiated under the Energy Efficiency call topics EE-10-2016 and EE-11-2016.
TRL 7 shall be achieved at the end of the project (please see part G of the General Annexes).
This topic will contribute to the PPP on Energy-efficient Buildings.
Opening the project's test sites, pilot and demonstration facilities, or research infrastructures for practice oriented education, training or knowledge exchange is encouraged.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 5 to 8 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact: The action will result in the demonstration of geothermal systems, to be used in existing buildings, that make geothermal energy a viable and cost-competitive source of energy for heating and cooling. The demonstrated systems will be easy to install in built environments and have a proved efficiency in different geological conditions. The action will increase the commercial attractiveness of geothermal energy for heating and cooling and therefore increase the penetration of this renewable energy source.

Type of Action: Innovation action

   

NMP+B    <<    Ação Climática
CIRC-01b-2017Systemic, eco-innovative approaches for the circular economy: large-scale demonstration projects - Systemic services for the circular economyd.l. 07-03-2017
Call H2020-CIRC-2017-two-stage (subcall de: H2020-CIRC-2016-2017)
Circular Economy
Orçamento 70,00 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de fecho 2ª Fase: 5 Setembro 2017

Circular economy

Specific Challenge: The increasing resources' constraints that EU is facing strongly condition
its competitiveness and the quality of life of individuals. Important gains in resource
efficiency can be made by replacing current linear economic models with circular models of
production and consumption, which result, at the same time, in a substantial reduction of
GHG emissions. While relying on industrial leadership, the success of circular economy
models will depend on adopting a systemic approach to eco-innovation that encompasses
value and supply chains in their entirety and engages all actors involved in such chains. A
systemic approach entails foresight of the diverse impacts that transformative innovative
solutions can have on the economy, environment and society at large. Side-effects of
innovative practices can thus be addressed, e.g. change in energy policy due to a reduction of
waste available for energy recovery. Bringing end-users closer to the design and production
phases, and customising the production and delivery of goods and associated services can
boost new consumption patterns that add greater value and reduce over-production, waste and
other negative environmental impacts. The involvement of end-users in designing circular
economic models that better respond to their needs can enable the development of valueadded
solutions and act as a driver for Europe's re-industrialisation

b) Systemic services for the circular economy (2017): To demonstrate through large scale
projects the economic and environmental feasibility of circular economic business models that
underpin new services based on performance/functionality rather than ownership, and/or on
mass customisation, including through supporting demand side measures. Proposals should
adopt a systemic eco-innovative approach addressing all forms of innovation, combining
technological, organisational, societal, cultural and behavioural innovation, and strengthening
the participation of civil society. Such an approach can foster new forms of collaboration
between end-users, producers and researchers. In particular proposals should consider ways of
supporting co-creation by developing, experimenting and demonstrating new business models
together with end-users, taking into consideration their needs, including gender dimension,
thus enabling the development of value adding solutions. Business models that foster new
services and consumption and production patterns will require support to end-users in the
transition to the circular economy by raising awareness and knowledge sharing activities on
circular economy models. The proposals should include an outline business plan which can be
developed further in the course of the project.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between
EUR 4 million and EUR 7 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed
appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals
requesting other amounts.

Within the projects funded, additional or follow-up funding should be sought, be it
private or public, so as to achieve a more effective implementation and deployment at larger
scale and scope of the innovative solutions addressed. Additional funding sources could
include relevant regional/national schemes under the European Structural and Investment
Funds (ESIF), such as under the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), or other
relevant funds such as the Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA II). In the latter case,
contacts could be established with the funds managing body during the duration of the
projects. In case of relevance for the Research and Innovation Smart Specialisation Strategies,
the project proposals could already indicate which interested regions/countries have been preidentified.
Please note, however, that reference to such additional or follow-up funding will
not lead automatically to a higher score in the evaluation of the proposal.

Within the projects funded, possible regulatory barriers should also be addressed, as
appropriate. In particular 'Innovation Deals' may be proposed. By 'Innovation Deal' a bottomup
approach to address regulatory bottlenecks to innovation is understood, that would take the
form of voluntary agreements, with the European Commission and external stakeholders, with
the aim of identifying and overcoming regulatory barriers and thus facilitating the market uptake
of innovative solutions.

A life cycle thinking and assessment, in line with the recommendations and reference data
from the European Platform on Life Cycle Assessment when applicable, should be applied.

Expected Impact:
The testing and demonstrating of circular economic business models and services,
including logistics and ICT capabilities, based on performance/functionality enhancement, is
expected to measurably contribute in the medium term to:
• creating markets for new products/services (e.g. leasing or 'sharing' practices) which
empower end-users in their choice for more sustainable consumption patterns, and
require the implementation of innovative producer responsibility or other sectorial or
cross-sectorial governance schemes;
• enabling the development of new approaches for designing products/services that
collectively consider end-users, brand owners, as well as entrepreneurs, and researchers,
and deliver the needs of end-users;
• reducing supply chain length, thus increasing resource efficiency and reducing adverse
impacts on the environment, including on climate change;
• facilitating the inclusion of resource or materials criteria in designing products/services
(e.g. durability, reparability and recyclability), thus contributing to an increase in
resource and energy efficiency, and reduced environmental impacts, in the whole life
cycle of products;
• creating new business opportunities for industry and SMEs in the EU, contributing to the
exploitation of EU innovative solutions, and improving the competitiveness of European
enterprises in the global market for eco-innovative solutions;
• demonstrating the economic, social, cultural and environmental sustainability of the
proposed approaches and main elements that a business plan should include in order to
realise them, including the assessment of possible positive and negative side-effects and
risks, such as those associated with harmful substances potentially present in recycled
materials;
• providing evidence-based knowledge regarding the enabling framework conditions (such
as the regulatory or policy framework or cultural factors) that facilitate a broader
transition to a circular economy in the EU;
• implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular SDG 12 'Ensure
sustainable consumption and production patterns', as well as the conclusions of the
COP21 Paris Agreement14.

Type of Action: Innovation action
CIRC-02b-2017Water in the context of the circular economy - Towards the next generation of water systems and services – large scale demonstration projectsd.l. 07-03-2017
Call H2020-CIRC-2017-two-stage (subcall de: H2020-CIRC-2016-2017)
Circular Economy
Orçamento 70,00 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de fecho 2ª Fase: 5 Setembro 2017
Specific Challenge: The European water sector has a prominent position in economy and
society, but it is very diverse and fragmented. It needs to revolutionise the way public and
private actors work together so as to address water-related challenges and seize on
opportunities strengthening a demand-driven approach. A systemic approach, incorporating
both the physical structure of the system and the rules governing the operation, performance
and interactions of its components, could address those issues in an integrated manner. Such
an approach should go beyond the pursuit of wastewater treatment and reduction of water use
to inspire technological, organisational and social innovation through the whole value chain of
water (i.e. water as a resource, as a productive input and as a waste stream), moving towards a
circular economy approach.

More specifically, with an increasing global demand for food, feed and fibre, the demand for
nutrients is growing. Although increasing food and biomass production necessitates a higher
application of nutrients, current fertilisation practices use resources inefficiently. At the same
time accumulation of nutrients is causing major environmental problems. The EU legislation
is already aiming at regulating nutrient emissions to the environment but more can be done to
encourage a transition to an efficient nutrient recovery and recycling. Water is the most used
carrier of nutrients and, at the same time, an important resource itself. Water treatment
management models and technologies have the potential to create new business opportunities
for an extensive nutrient recovery and contribute to the circular economy. However, an
extensive implementation of integrated nutrient recovery technologies and the use of the
recovered nutrients at European level is still lacking and this is proposed to be addressed in
the 2016 call for proposals.

In addition, today's water services aim mainly to save water and to improve its quality.
However, water becomes more and more a scarce resource as a result of urbanisation,
increased competition between various uses, economic sectors and extreme weather events.

To deal effectively with these pressures, there is a need for improving water systems by
considering the whole water-use production chain and by identifying solutions that enhance
both the economic and environmental performance of the system. These innovative solutions
should be in line with the objectives of the circular economy, contributing to the challenges of
a depletion of raw materials (e.g. through the recovery of resources from waste water) and
climate change (reducing energy needs or producing energy) and should be demonstrated at
large scale. This is proposed to be addressed in the 2017 call for proposals.

b) Towards the next generation of water systems and services – large scale
demonstration projects (2017):
The objective of this topic is to demonstrate innovative
solutions at a large scale (i.e regions, cities and/or river basins), in line with EIP Water
priorities and the objectives of the Water Framework Directive. Proposals should focus on
developing the water services of the future, going beyond water supply sustainability
addressing the different water value chains. They should integrate, for instance, the
management of water resources and the provision of water services, expanding the re-use of
treated waste water and the use of desalinated water (where appropriate), ensuring carbon
neutral water services, and closing the water cycle by increasing the efficiency of wastewater
treatment plants, including the recovery of energy and the re-use of chemicals and nutrients.
Projects should build on experience already gained in areas where integration of various
aspects of water management and other economic and social activities is already taking place
at different levels, with replication potential in other areas of Europe or at wider scale, thus
demonstrating a real added-value at EU level.

Successful projects should engage all relevant
stakeholders, especially user communities, at an early stage in the co-creation process,
bringing together technology push and application pull. This is also necessary to show the
potential of using systemic eco-innovative approaches in water, to overcome related barriers
and bottlenecks and to create new opportunities for jobs and growth in various regions and
river basins. Participation of industry partners from relevant sectors is considered essential
and the active participation of SMEs is encouraged. The application of new business models
and new value chains is encouraged. The proposals should include an outline business plan
which can be developed further in the course of the project. Where relevant, integrated
environmental impact assessments and risk assessment of potential harmful substances should
be considered. Relevant socio-economic issues, in particular, regulatory/governance issues,
social behaviour and acceptability should also be addressed, requiring the participation of
social sciences and humanities disciplines such as political sciences, economics, governance
and business studies. To enhance the systemic approach and the transformation of water
services toward a more circular economy approach, digital technologies and ICT tools should
be also considered. Activities aiming at facilitating the market uptake of innovative solutions,
including standardisation, should also be addressed.

Within the projects funded, additional or follow-up funding should be sought, be it private or
public, so as to achieve a more effective implementation and deployment at larger scale and
scope of the innovative solutions addressed. Additional funding sources could include
relevant regional/national schemes under the European Structural and Investment Funds
(ESIF), such as under the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), or other relevant
funds such as the Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA II). In these cases, contacts
could be established with the funds' managing body during the duration of the projects. In
case of relevance for the Research and Innovation Smart Specialisation Strategies, the project
proposals could already indicate which interested regions/countries have been pre-identified.
Please note, however, that reference to such additional or follow-up funding will not lead
automatically to a higher score in the evaluation of the proposal.
Where technological innovation is concerned, TRL 5-7 should be achieved.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of a range of
EUR 10 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately.

Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other
amounts.

For both (2016 and 2017): Within the projects funded, possible regulatory barriers should
also be addressed, as appropriate. In particular 'Innovation Deals' may be proposed. By
'Innovation Deal' an innovative better regulation instrument is understood, in the form of
voluntary agreements with external stakeholders to identify and overcome regulatory barriers
to innovative solutions that would enable policy or legislative objectives to be better achieved.

Expected Impact: Projects are expected to contribute to:

b)
• significant reduction of the current water and energy consumption at regional and/or
river basin scale by closing the cycles of material, water and energy, using alternative
water sources and supporting the transition towards smart water services;
• interconnectivity between the water system and other economic and social sectors;
• increased public involvement in water management;
• increased citizen satisfaction with water services;
• replication of new business models in other areas and replication of models for synergies
between appropriate funding instruments at regional, national or European level;
• closing of the infrastructure and investment gap in the water service sector;
• creation of new markets in the short and medium term;
• providing evidence-based knowledge regarding the enabling framework conditions (such
as the regulatory or policy framework) that facilitate a broader transition to a circular
economy in the EU;
• implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular SDG 12 'Ensure
sustainable consumption and production patterns' and SDG 6 'Ensure availability and
sustainable management of water and sanitation for all', as well as the conclusions of the
COP21 Paris Agreement.

Type of Action: Innovation action

   

NMP+B    <<    Segurança
SEC-19-BES-2016Data fusion for maritime security applicationsd.l. 25-08-2016
Call H2020-SEC-2016 (subcall de: H2020-SEC-2016-2017)
SECURITY
Orçamento 113,25 M€

BORDER SECURITY AND EXTERNAL SECURITY

                           
Topic Description
Specific Challenge:

In coherence with the objectives of regulation No 1052/2013 establishing the European Border Surveillance System (EUROSUR), the EU Maritime Security Strategy Action Plan (EUMSS AP) advocates the "strengthening of […] the information exchange to optimise the surveillance of the EU maritime area and its maritime borders" and "the improvement of the situational awareness and increase reaction capability at the external borders of the Member States of the Union for the purpose of detecting, preventing and combating illegal immigration and cross-border crime, and contributing to ensuring the protection and saving of lives of migrants").

Large amounts of “raw” data are being collected nowadays, at unprecedented scale, coming from different sources, from different sorts of assets from different EU Member States, from the Internet and social networks, and gathered for different security purposes, in a variety of formats, are available but not necessarily exploitable because they are not accessible at the same time nor interoperable, until they are “fused” and made “understandable” to all systems supporting information exchange, situational awareness, and decision-making and reaction capability at the EU external maritime borders.

Scope:

Many detection systems are available to collect data that are useful for maritime security, coastal surveillance and beyond. The fusion of these data requires the development of methods and tools that take account of the technical characteristics of existing systems, and the specific context of all aspects of maritime security. As regards semantic interoperability, the CISE data model should be used to avoid the duplication of solutions.

"Fusion" may refer to “intelligence correlation to produce higher level (or more accurate) information". It may involve, inter alia:

  • mixing several homogeneous data to produce another data of superior quality;
  • pre-processing raw data and associating heterogeneous data, produced by different types of sensors, that refer to the same actual object or event, to produce information of superior quality;
  • overlapping surveillance pictures produced by different sources and generate a picture without redundant objects/tracks and allowing to deal with faulty sensors and data;
  • combining data acquired at different points in time through sensors (e.g. radars and camera) installed on the same platform or on different ones (underwater or surface vessels, drones or aircraft, satellite systems (including but not exclusively Copernicus, Galileo, and EGNOS);
  • combining offline with realtime data.

Data fusion techniques, complementing the existing information systems and sensor platforms, should help focusing the geographical zones to be monitored through the deployment of surveillance capabilities.

EU-funded R&D cooperative projects and EU Agencies have touched upon the issue. Data fusion may bear on, or generate information needing classification. Ethical and societal issues need to be properly addressed. Proposals need to build on existing results, focus on the remaining gaps and avoid duplication with previous endeavours.

In line with the EU's strategy for international cooperation in research and innovation[[COM(2012)497]] international cooperation is encouraged, and in particular with international research partners involved in ongoing discussions and workshops, with the European Commission. Legal entities established in countries not listed in General Annex A and international organisations will be eligible for funding only when the Commission deems participation of the entity essential for carrying out the action.

Whereas activities will have an exclusive focus on civil applications, coordination with the activities of the European Defence Agency (EDA) may be considered with possible synergies being established with projects funded by the EDA programmes. The complementarity of such synergies should be described comprehensively. On-going cooperation should be taken into account.

The outcome of the proposal is expected to lead to development up to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 7; please see part G of the General Annexes.

Indicative budget: The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of € 8million would allow for this topic to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:
  • Description of how to integrate the knowledge on data fusion originating from pre-existing EU-funded R&D cooperative projects;
  • Contribution to the further development of EUROSUR and to the implementation of the 2nd work strand of the EUMSS Action Plan dealing with "Maritime awareness, surveillance and information sharing";
  • Improved and extended maritime border situational awareness;
  • Improved operational support to search-and-rescue activities;
  • Improved border surveillance systems in terms of information exchange, situational awareness, and decision-making and reaction capabilities;
  • Solutions better fitting the existing systems and the actual concepts of operations set for missions involving the assets of several Member States maritime border surveillance, security and search-and-rescue organisations;
  • Pre-standards to be followed by standardization procedures with the ESO;
  • Solutions demonstrated in the context of interagency and cross-border cooperation;
  • Solutions interfaced with existing infrastructure (systems, platforms and networks of sensors.).
SEC-20-BES-2016Border Security: autonomous systems and control systemsd.l. 25-08-2016
Call H2020-SEC-2016 (subcall de: H2020-SEC-2016-2017)
SECURITY
Orçamento 113,25 M€

BORDER SECURITY AND EXTERNAL SECURITY

                           
Topic Description
Specific Challenge:

Low levels of situational awareness on the EU borders, high at sea and on unpopulated or scarcely populated land areas, are important factors of cost of border surveillance. This could improve if the different prototypes of unmanned vehicles tested today to perform automatically a very limited set of functions and routines could be transformed into autonomous, long-enduring agents able to operate in complex maritime and land environments.

Current border control systems involve a wide range of heterogeneous assets – manned and unmanned – to survey from air, surface (land and sea) and underwater. Similarly the objects of their surveillance may be vessels, land vehicles, aircrafts, and underwater vehicles used, for instance, for smuggling and trafficking. Only enhanced command and control systems using advanced 3D computer graphics technology may allow to represent accurately the position of surveillance assets – including autonomous agents – and external objects in such complex environments.

Scope:

The proposed action should cover one of the following sub-topics:

Sub-topic: 1.Autonomous surveillance

Autonomous agents should be adaptable: in order to deal, where applicable, with extreme and diverse weather and sea condition, including in the Artic region; interconnected: interoperable and capable of exchanging information among themselves and with the system's ground segment; tele-operable from the ground.

They should support missions ranging from surveillance to detection of marine pollution incidents, and including early identification and tracking of illegal activities and illegal communication.

They should operate as single units, but also in homogeneous or heterogeneous groups i.e. mixing aerostats, aerial vehicles with fix, rotary wings (or tilt-rotor), unmanned surface vehicles (USV), unmanned under-surface vehicles (UUSV), unmanned ground vehicles (UGV) with different types of sensor and communication suites on board, customized according to operational and environmental needs and addressing cross-cueing.

Autonomous agents should exchange information at tactical level and interface with each other and with command and control systems as they exist, today, at different levels.

Sub-topic: 2.Enhanced command and control systems for the surveillance of borders in a 3D environment Autonomous surveillance

Enhanced command and control systems should integrate:

  • air surveillance technologies (including radar technologies for the detection of low flying aircrafts);
  • coastal and underwater surveillance technologies (including coastal radar, maritime patrol aircraft (MPA), light patrol aircrafts, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), Patrol Vessels, UUV, etc.);
  • ground surveillance technologies (including UGV);
  • satellite-based services;
  • maritime information services;
  • 3D cartography and bathymetry servers;
  • 3D modelling of situational picture based on 3D computers graphics engines;
  • augmented reality technologies;
  • mobile devices and handsets such as tablets and smartphones.

The participation of SMEs is strongly encouraged.

In line with the EU's strategy for international cooperation in research and innovation[[COM(2012)497]] international cooperation is encouraged, and in particular with international research partners involved in ongoing discussions and workshops, with the European Commission. Legal entities established in countries not listed in General Annex A and international organisations will be eligible for funding only when the Commission deems participation of the entity essential for carrying out the action.

The outcome of the proposal is expected to lead to development up to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6 or7; please see part G of the General Annexes.

Indicative budget: The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of € 8million would allow for this topic to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:
  • Further development of the European Border Surveillance System (EUROSUR);
  • Provision of more information that may be exchanged across sectors and borders through the Common Information Sharing Environment (CISE);
  • New technologies for autonomous surveillance systems;
  • Improved, cost-effective and efficient unmanned platforms for border surveillance systems, and the detection of marine pollution incidents;
  • Adaptation of long-tested technologies to the specific requirements of borders control area;
  • Agents and command and control systems interoperable with existing, multi-country European infrastructure.

   

ICT    <<    FET
FETHPC-01-2016Co-design of HPC systems and applicationsd.l. 27-09-2016
Call FETHPC-01-2016 (subcall de: H2020-FETHPC-2016-2017)
Co-design of HPC systems and applications
Orçamento 41,00 M€
Specific Challenge:

Achieve world-class extreme scale, power-efficient and highly resilient HPC platforms through a strong co-design approach driven by ambitious applications and in close cooperation with the scientific disciplines and stakeholders concerned; achieve the full range of technological capabilities needed for delivering a broad spectrum of extreme scale HPC systems. The designs of these systems must respond to critical demands of energy efficiency, scale, resilience, programmability and support for various classes of applications including extreme-data applications.

Scope:

Proposals with innovative and ground-breaking approaches to system architectures targeting extreme scale, power-efficient and highly resilient platforms with emphasis on balanced compute and data access characteristics. Special attention should be given to extreme data processing requirements. Proposals should have a strong co-design approach driven by a mix of ambitious applications and in close cooperation with the various scientific disciplines and stakeholders concerned. Proposals should show how their proposed solution improves energy efficiency and demonstrate the reduced energy-to-solution for the selected applications. Possible strategies for improving energy efficiency may include: reducing PUE (Power Usage Effectiveness), designing of cost-efficient approaches to the reuse of thermal energy, reducing the amount of energy spent for communication and data movement. Proposals should address the problem of maintaining reliability, coping with run-time errors and enabling stable operation of an HPC system that is able of extreme scaling; this issue may be addressed through holistic detection/recover approaches covering and orchestrating all layers of the HPC stack as well as significant advancements in fault prediction algorithms and smarter tools to prevent faults. Proposals should provide analytical or simulation models that allow to extrapolate the sustained performance on the given architecture for HPC systems. The target system architectures must scale to at least 100 PFlops and, for compute-centric workloads, a target of 15MW for 250 PFlops peak performance in 2019 is suggested. Proposals should explain how these scalability and energy-efficiency targets are achieved for the considered applications. APIs and interfaces between applications and underlying middleware, run-time and operating systems, i.e. all application-aspects impacting the underlying system design are included in this topic. Proposals should be able to demonstrate their achievements in integrated pre-exascale prototypes.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution between EUR 10 and 20 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:
  • Contribution to the realisation of the ETP4HPC Strategic Research Agenda, thus strengthened European research and industrial leadership in HPC technologies.
  • Proof-of-concept through integrated pre-exascale prototypes for future energy-efficient exascale-class HPC systems and optimal co-design driven by ambitious applications.
  • Covering important segments of the broader and/or emerging HPC markets, especially extreme-scale HPC systems.
  • Impact on standards bodies and other relevant international research programmes and frameworks.
FETHPC-02-2017Transition to Exascale Computingd.l. 26-09-2017
Call FETHPC-02-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETHPC-2016-2017)
Transition to Exascale Computing
Orçamento 40,00 M€

FETHPC-02-2017: Transition to Exascale Computing


Specific Challenge:

Take advantage of the full capabilities of exascale computing, in particular through high-productivity programming environments, system software and management, exascale I/O and storage in the presence of multiple tiers of data storage, supercomputing for extreme data and emerging HPC use modes, mathematics and algorithms for extreme scale HPC systems for existing or visionary applications, including data-intensive and extreme data applications in scientific areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, life sciences, materials, climate, geosciences, etc.


Scope:

Proposals should address one or more of the following subtopics:


a) High productivity programming environments for exascale: Proposals should have as target to simplify application software development for large- and extreme-scale systems. This can include the development of more productive programming models and environments, the easier combination of different programming models, and using increased intelligence throughout the programming environment. Key aspects include managing data transfers, data locality and memory management, including support for heterogeneous and reconfigurable systems as well as dealing with inter-application dynamic load balancing and malleability, adapting to changes in the number of processors. Unified performance tools are required supporting HPC, embedded and extreme data workloads, on diverse target systems. APIs, runtime systems and the underlying libraries should support auto-tuning for performance and energy optimisation. Automated support for debugging and anomaly detection is also included under this subtopic. To provide simplified development and to ensure the maintainability of domain-specific languages (DSLs), DSL frameworks are required which target a general-purpose stable programming model and runtime. Since large future systems will require the use of multiple programming models or APIs, an important aspect is interoperability and standardisation of programming model, API and runtime as well as the composability of programming models (the capability of building new programming models out of existing programming model elements)

b) Exascale system software and management: Proposals should advance the state of the art in system software and management for node architectures that will be drastically more complex and their resource topology and heterogeneity will require OS and runtime enhancement, such as data aware scheduling. In the area of hardware abstraction, proposals should address run time handling of all types of resources (cores, bandwidth, logical and physical memory or storage) and controls, e.g. for optimised data coherency, consistency and data flow. For applications, proposals should address new multi-criteria resource allocation capabilities and interaction during task execution, with the aim to improve resilience, interactivity, power and efficiency. To cope with the exploding amount of data, the sequential analysis process (capture, store, analyse) is not sufficient; proposals should explore on-the-fly analysis methods offering reactivity, compute efficiency and availability. Graphical simulation interaction will require new real-time features; configuration and deployment tools will have to evolve to take into account the composability of software execution environments.

c) Exascale I/O and storage in the presence of multiple tiers of data storage: proposals should address exascale I/O systems expected to have multiple tiers of data storage technologies, including non-volatile memory. Fine grain data access prioritisation of processes and applications sharing data in these tiers is one of the goals as well as prioritisation applied to file/object creates/deletes. Runtime layers should combine data replication with data layout transformations relevant for HPC, in order to meet the needs for improved performance and resiliency. It is also desirable for the I/O subsystem to adaptively provide optimal performance or reliability especially in the presence of millions of processes simultaneously doing I/O. It is critical that programming system interoperability and standardised APIs are achieved. On the fly data management supporting data processing, taking into account multi-tiered storage and involving real time in situ/in transit processing should be addressed.

d) Supercomputing for Extreme Data and emerging HPC use modes: HPC architectures for real-time and in-situ data analytics are required to support the processing of large-scale and high velocity real-time data (e.g. sensor data, Internet of Things) together with large volumes of stored data (e.g. climate simulations, predictive models, etc.). The approaches should include support for real-time in-memory analysis of different data structures, direct processing of compressed data and appropriate benchmarking method for performance analysis. Interactive 3-D visualisation of large-scale data to allow users to explore large information spaces in 3-D and perform on-demand data analysis in real-time (e.g. large scale queries or analytics) should be addressed. Interactive supercomputing is required to execute complex workflows for urgent decision making in the field of critical clinical diagnostics, natural risks or spread of diseases; this implies adapting operational procedures of HPC infrastructures, developing efficient co-scheduling techniques or improving checkpoint/restart and extreme data management

e) Mathematics and algorithms for extreme scale HPC systems and applications working with extreme data: Specific issues are quantification of uncertainties and noise, multi-scale, multi-physics and extreme data. Mathematical methods, numerical analysis, algorithms and software engineering for extreme parallelism should be addressed. Novel and disruptive algorithmic strategies should be explored to minimize data movement as well as the number of communication and synchronization instances in extreme computing. Parallel-in-time methods may be investigated to boost parallelism of simulation codes across a wide range of application domains. Taking into account data-related uncertainties is essential for the acceptance of numerical simulation in decision making; a unified European VVUQ (Verification Validation and Uncertainty Quantification) package for Exascale computing should be provided by improving methodologies and solving problems limiting usability for very large computations on many-core configurations; access to the VVUQ techniques for the HPC community should be facilitated by providing software that is ready for deployment on supercomputers.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 2 and 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. Proposals should clearly indicate the subtopic which is their main focus. At least one project per subtopic will be funded.


Expected Impact:

  • Contribution to the realisation of the ETP4HPC Strategic Research Agenda, thus strengthened European research and industrial leadership in HPC technologies.
  • Successful transition to practical exascale computing for the addressed specific element of the HPC stack.
  • Covering important segments of the broader and/or emerging HPC markets, especially extreme-computing, emerging use modes and extreme-data HPC systems.
  • Impact on standards bodies and other relevant international research programmes and frameworks.
  • European excellence in mathematics and algorithms for extreme parallelism and extreme data applications to boost research and innovation in scientific areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, life sciences, materials, climate, geosciences, etc.

FETHPC-03-2017Exascale HPC ecosystem developmentd.l. 26-09-2017
Call FETHPC-03-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETHPC-2016-2017)
Exascale HPC ecosystem developmen
Orçamento 4,00 M€

FETHPC-03-2017: Exascale HPC ecosystem development


Specific Challenge:

To develop a sustainable European exascale HPC Ecosystem.

Scope:

Proposals should address a single of the two following subtopics:

a) Coordination of the Exascale HPC strategy and International Collaboration: Proposals must include activities for promoting a joint community structuring and synchronisation; the further development and update of the Strategic Research Agenda for High Performance Computing as well as the application and applied mathematics exascale roadmaps; prepare the ground for targeted international research collaboration on specific aspects of the exascale challenges. Proposed actions should also seek to create synergies with other HPC related activities under H2020, in particular concerning the underlying basic technologies that are required for exascale computing (e.g. LEIT/Advanced Computing, LEIT/Photonics, and ECSEL (Electronic Components and Systems for European Leadership)); and concerning the relevant research in applications, the progress of which critically relies on cutting-edge HPC systems (LEIT/Big-Data, LEIT/Cloud area as well as relevant research in applications emerging from the H2020 Societal Challenges in domains such as health (e.g. VPH initiative), genomics, climate change, energy, mobility and smart cities).

b) Excellence in Exascale Computing Systems: The focus should be in boosting European HPC academic research excellence in future exascale-class computing cutting across all levels – hardware, architectures, programming, applications – and including specific actions to better structure the European academic HPC research, create stronger links with HPC providers and HPC users, attract venture capital, promote entrepreneurship and foster industry take-up.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

    • Strengthened European research and industrial leadership in the supply, operation and use of HPC systems.
    • Contribution to the realisation of the ETP4HPC Strategic Research Agenda.
    • Development of a competitive European ecosystem for building and exploiting a wide range of next-generation extreme performance computing systems.
    • Structuring the efforts of stakeholders for implementing the European HPC strategy.
    • Reinforced cooperation in international endeavours on HPC software and systems towards exascale.
    • European Excellence in Exascale Computing systems

FETOPEN-01-2016-2017FET-Open research and innovation actionsd.l. 27-09-2017
Call FETOPEN-01-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETOPEN-2016-2017)
FET-Open research and innovation actions
Orçamento 110,50 M€
Specific Challenge: The successful exploration of new foundations for radically new future technologies requires supporting a large set of early stage, high risk visionary science and technology projects to investigate new ideas. Here agile, risk-friendly and highly interdisciplinary research approaches are needed with collaborations that are open to all sciences and disciplines and that dissolve the traditional boundaries between them. The renewal of ideas is complemented by the renewal of actors taking these new ideas forward. Therefore, this topic encourages the driving role of new high-potential actors in research and innovation, such as excellent young, both female and male, researchers and high-tech SMEs that may become the scientific and industrial leaders of the future.

Scope: This topic supports the early stages of research to establish a new technological possibility. Proposals are sought for collaborative research with all of the following characteristics ('FET gatekeepers'):  
•    Long-term vision: the research proposed must address a new and radical long-term vision of a science- and technology-enabled future that is far beyond the state of the art and not currently foreseen by technology roadmaps.  
•    Breakthrough scientific and technological target: research must target a scientifically ambitious and technologically concrete breakthrough, argued to be a crucial step towards achieving the long-term vision. The plausibility of the proposed breakthrough(s) to be attained within the life-time of the project must be argued in the proposal.  
•    Novelty: the research proposed for achieving the breakthrough must be based on cutting-edge knowledge, new ideas and concepts, rather than in the mere application or incremental refinement of existing ones.  
•    Foundational: the breakthroughs that are envisaged must be foundational in the sense that, if achieved, they would establish an essential basis for a new kind of technology and its future uses, not currently anticipated.  
•    High-risk: the inherently high risk of the research proposed will be reflected in a flexible but effective methodology for exploring alternative directions and options, supported by open and agile research and innovation practices.  
•    Interdisciplinary: the proposed collaborations are expected to go beyond 'waterfall' configurations in multi-disciplinary science- and technology research. Instead they should seek new solutions through genuine exchanges, mutual learning, cross-fertilisation and synergistic advances among distant disciplines in order to open unexplored areas of investigation and new directions for joint research.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 3 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:   
•    Initiating or consolidating a baseline of feasibility for a radically new line of technology and its future uses by establishing the essential proofs-of-principle and their foundational scientific underpinnings.  
•    Strengthening European leadership in the early exploration of visionary, new and emerging technologies, beyond academic excellence and with global recognition. This impact can be reinforced by involving also new high-potential actors such as young, both female and male, researchers and high-tech SMEs that may become the European scientific and technological leaders and innovators of the future.  
•    Impact is also sought in terms of the take up of new research and innovation practices for making leading-edge science and technology research more open, collaborative, creative and closer to society.  

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action
FETOPEN-03-2017FET-Open Coordination and Support Actionsd.l. 20-03-2017
Call FETOPEN-03-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETOPEN-2016-2017)
FET-Open Coordination and Support Actions
Orçamento 1,50 M€
Specific Challenge:

The challenge is to make Europe the best place in the world for collaborative research and innovation on future and emerging technologies that will renew the basis for future European competitiveness and growth, and that will make a difference for society in the decades to come.

Scope:

Proposals should address one of the following topics:

  1. FET Futures [2017] [[This activity directly aimed at supporting the development and implementation of evidence base for R&I policies is excluded from the delegation to REA and will be implemented by the Commission services.]]: identifying strategy options, challenges and opportunities to stimulate and organise interdisciplinary research and innovation towards new and visionary technologies of any kind. Actions should rely on evidence from FET activities (e.g., portfolio, constituency, results) and from other sources (including other funding bodies or private initiatives worldwide, like those using prize schemes or challenges). They should aim at open and dynamic stakeholder participation using creative methods and on-line tools/social networks. This topic should include public engagement processes as discussed in the introduction of this FET Work Programme.
  2. FET Exchange [2017]: actions for structuring and strengthening an emerging FET-relevant science and technology research and innovation topic and the interdisciplinary communities involved in this topic. This may include, for example, research roadmapping, stimulating (formal and informal) learning and exchange, expanding the range of disciplines (including the life sciences and humanities where relevant), involving new actors such as young researchers, entrepreneurs and high-tech SMEs, and broadening stakeholder engagement (multi-actor or citizen).

For scope item a) at most one action will be funded.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 0.3 and 0.5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Strengthening globally recognised European leadership in the early exploration of visionary, new and emerging technologies, beyond academic excellence and with a strong engagement of scientists, citizens, innovators and policy makers.
Improved long-term innovation potential in Europe both from the abundance of novel ideas and the range of actors ready to take them forward.
Improved understanding of the range of possible impact mechanisms for long-term science and technology research.
Improved readiness across Europe to engage in silo-breaking research collaboration and to take up new research and innovation practices.

FETOPEN-04-2016-2017FET Innovation Launchpadd.l. 29-09-2016
Call FETOPEN-04-2016 (subcall de: H2020-FETOPEN-2016-2017)
FET Innovation Launchpad
Orçamento 1,20 M€
Specific Challenge:

FET projects often generate new and sometimes unexpected opportunities for commercial or societal application. This topic aims at funding further innovation related work (i.e. activities which were not scheduled to be funded by the original project) to verify and substantiate the innovation potential of ideas arising from FET funded projects and to support the next steps in turning them into a genuine social or economic innovation.

Scope:

Short and focused individual or collaborative actions to take out of the lab a promising result or proof-of-concept that originated from a FET-funded project and to get it on the way to social or economic innovation through new entrepreneurship or otherwise. The action will support the transformation of that specific research result into a credible offering for economic or social impact, by exploring the feasibility of an exploitation path and by coordinating and supporting the assembling of the right knowledge, skills and resources and thus serves as a launch pad for exploitation.

This call topic is focused on the early innovation stages from results of an ongoing or recently finished project[[For a project to be considered 'ongoing or recently finished' in the context of this call topic its end date must be at most one year before the deadline for proposal submission to this topic.]] funded through FET under FP7 or H2020. The complementarity and precise link with the relevant FET project is to be explicitly addressed in the proposal by clearly stating the nature and origin of the results to be taken up, and by adding a confirmation of any necessary agreements with owners or right holders of those results to move towards their exploitation. This call topic does not fund additional research, nor does it fund activities that are/were already foreseen in the relevant FET project. Activities to be funded should be fit-for-purpose (e.g., tailored to the level of maturity of the result to be taken up) and can include, among others, the definition of a commercialisation process to be followed, market and competitiveness analysis, technology assessment, consolidation of intellectual property rights and strategy, scenario and business case development, developing contacts and support relevant activities with for instance, industrial transfer partners, potential licence-takers, investors, societal organisations or potential end users.

By focusing on the very early stage of the innovation path, the scope of this call includes situations where an SME or other suitable entrepreneurial context may not yet exist.

The Commission considers that proposals for actions no longer than 18 months and requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 0.1 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals of different duration.

Expected Impact:
  • Increased innovation potential from FET projects by picking up expected as well as non-anticipated innovation opportunities.
  • Creation of concrete and closer-to-market high-potential innovations from FET projects.
  • Stimulating, supporting and rewarding an open and proactive mind-set towards exploitation beyond the European research world.
  • Seeding future growth and the creation of jobs from FET research.
FETPROACT-02-2017FET ERANET Cofundd.l. 24-01-2017
Call FETPROACT-02-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETPROACT-2016-2017)
FET ERANET Cofund
Orçamento 5,00 M€

FETHPC-02-2017: Transition to Exascale Computing

Specific Challenge:

Take advantage of the full capabilities of exascale computing, in particular through high-productivity programming environments, system software and management, exascale I/O and storage in the presence of multiple tiers of data storage, supercomputing for extreme data and emerging HPC use modes, mathematics and algorithms for extreme scale HPC systems for existing or visionary applications, including data-intensive and extreme data applications in scientific areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, life sciences, materials, climate, geosciences, etc.

Scope:

Proposals should address one or more of the following subtopics:

a) High productivity programming environments for exascale: Proposals should have as target to simplify application software development for large- and extreme-scale systems. This can include the development of more productive programming models and environments, the easier combination of different programming models, and using increased intelligence throughout the programming environment. Key aspects include managing data transfers, data locality and memory management, including support for heterogeneous and reconfigurable systems as well as dealing with inter-application dynamic load balancing and malleability, adapting to changes in the number of processors. Unified performance tools are required supporting HPC, embedded and extreme data workloads, on diverse target systems. APIs, runtime systems and the underlying libraries should support auto-tuning for performance and energy optimisation. Automated support for debugging and anomaly detection is also included under this subtopic. To provide simplified development and to ensure the maintainability of domain-specific languages (DSLs), DSL frameworks are required which target a general-purpose stable programming model and runtime. Since large future systems will require the use of multiple programming models or APIs, an important aspect is interoperability and standardisation of programming model, API and runtime as well as the composability of programming models (the capability of building new programming models out of existing programming model elements)

b) Exascale system software and management: Proposals should advance the state of the art in system software and management for node architectures that will be drastically more complex and their resource topology and heterogeneity will require OS and runtime enhancement, such as data aware scheduling. In the area of hardware abstraction, proposals should address run time handling of all types of resources (cores, bandwidth, logical and physical memory or storage) and controls, e.g. for optimised data coherency, consistency and data flow. For applications, proposals should address new multi-criteria resource allocation capabilities and interaction during task execution, with the aim to improve resilience, interactivity, power and efficiency. To cope with the exploding amount of data, the sequential analysis process (capture, store, analyse) is not sufficient; proposals should explore on-the-fly analysis methods offering reactivity, compute efficiency and availability. Graphical simulation interaction will require new real-time features; configuration and deployment tools will have to evolve to take into account the composability of software execution environments.

c) Exascale I/O and storage in the presence of multiple tiers of data storage: proposals should address exascale I/O systems expected to have multiple tiers of data storage technologies, including non-volatile memory. Fine grain data access prioritisation of processes and applications sharing data in these tiers is one of the goals as well as prioritisation applied to file/object creates/deletes. Runtime layers should combine data replication with data layout transformations relevant for HPC, in order to meet the needs for improved performance and resiliency. It is also desirable for the I/O subsystem to adaptively provide optimal performance or reliability especially in the presence of millions of processes simultaneously doing I/O. It is critical that programming system interoperability and standardised APIs are achieved. On the fly data management supporting data processing, taking into account multi-tiered storage and involving real time in situ/in transit processing should be addressed.

d) Supercomputing for Extreme Data and emerging HPC use modes: HPC architectures for real-time and in-situ data analytics are required to support the processing of large-scale and high velocity real-time data (e.g. sensor data, Internet of Things) together with large volumes of stored data (e.g. climate simulations, predictive models, etc.). The approaches should include support for real-time in-memory analysis of different data structures, direct processing of compressed data and appropriate benchmarking method for performance analysis. Interactive 3-D visualisation of large-scale data to allow users to explore large information spaces in 3-D and perform on-demand data analysis in real-time (e.g. large scale queries or analytics) should be addressed. Interactive supercomputing is required to execute complex workflows for urgent decision making in the field of critical clinical diagnostics, natural risks or spread of diseases; this implies adapting operational procedures of HPC infrastructures, developing efficient co-scheduling techniques or improving checkpoint/restart and extreme data management

e) Mathematics and algorithms for extreme scale HPC systems and applications working with extreme data: Specific issues are quantification of uncertainties and noise, multi-scale, multi-physics and extreme data. Mathematical methods, numerical analysis, algorithms and software engineering for extreme parallelism should be addressed. Novel and disruptive algorithmic strategies should be explored to minimize data movement as well as the number of communication and synchronization instances in extreme computing. Parallel-in-time methods may be investigated to boost parallelism of simulation codes across a wide range of application domains. Taking into account data-related uncertainties is essential for the acceptance of numerical simulation in decision making; a unified European VVUQ (Verification Validation and Uncertainty Quantification) package for Exascale computing should be provided by improving methodologies and solving problems limiting usability for very large computations on many-core configurations; access to the VVUQ techniques for the HPC community should be facilitated by providing software that is ready for deployment on supercomputers.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 2 and 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. Proposals should clearly indicate the subtopic which is their main focus. At least one project per subtopic will be funded.

Expected Impact:

  • Contribution to the realisation of the ETP4HPC Strategic Research Agenda, thus strengthened European research and industrial leadership in HPC technologies.
  • Successful transition to practical exascale computing for the addressed specific element of the HPC stack.
  • Covering important segments of the broader and/or emerging HPC markets, especially extreme-computing, emerging use modes and extreme-data HPC systems.
  • Impact on standards bodies and other relevant international research programmes and frameworks.
  • European excellence in mathematics and algorithms for extreme parallelism and extreme data applications to boost research and innovation in scientific areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, life sciences, materials, climate, geosciences, etc.

   

ICT    <<    NMP+B
BIOTEC-06-2017Optimisation of biocatalysis and downstream processing for the sustainable production of high value-added platform chemicalsd.l. 27-10-2016
Call H2020-BIOTEC-2017-two stage (subcall de: H2020-NMBP-2016-2017)
CALL FOR NANOTECHNOLOGIES, ADVANCED MATERIALS, BIOTECHNOLOGY AND PRODUCTION
Orçamento 48,00 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de Fecho 2ª Fase: 04-05-2017 (só propostas aprovadas na 1ª Fase podem concorrer à 2ª Fase)
Specific Challenge:

The bio-based production of chemical building blocks from renewable resources has become an interesting alternative to inherently non-sustainable petrochemical-based processes, which are neither low-carbon nor resource-efficient. However, despite the discovery and development of numerous platform cell factories, bio-based production is not (or not fully) competitive in terms of economics and remains, therefore, a niche market application dedicated to high-value specialty products.

To overcome current limitations, it is necessary to further improve the efficiency of bio-based production processes by creating better performing platform cell factories and relevant downstream processes.

Scope:

The objective is to optimise already existing or newly developed platform cell factories for the production of platform and fine chemicals and biofuels (excluding pharmaceuticals), following the cascading use of resources. Proposals should include areas such as bioinformatics, systems biology and synthetic biology where appropriate. Furthermore, applicants should take into account integrated approaches from sourcing of renewable biomass to bioconversion and downstream processing, including the final consumers of the bio-based product.

Proposals will have a strong industry drive and include demonstration activities to prove the techno-economic viability of the proposed value chain on the basis of a full Life-Cycle-Assessment, including the preparation of a model business plan to be developed during the project. The optimisation of the final product's 'end of life' through, for example, biodegradation or recycling should also be considered. Promotional activities, beyond the usual web-based approaches, targeted at all groups of participants should be included.

Activities are expected to focus on Technology Readiness Levels 5 to 7 and centred around TRL 6.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 5 and 7 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:
  • Reduction of the production costs of the proposed bio-based products by at least 30%.
  • Demonstration of the economic feasibility of the proposed value chains.
  • Contribution to a more sustainable, low-carbon economy through reduced reliance on petrochemical-based processes. 
  • Full set of promotional and outreach activities, targeted at specific stakeholder groups, and based on the full Life-Cycle-Assessment and business plan prepared.

Proposals should include a business case and exploitation strategy, as outlined in the Introduction to the LEIT part of this Work Programme.

EEB-06-2017Highly efficient hybrid storage solutions for power and heat in residential buildings and district areas, balancing the supply and demand conditionsd.l. 19-01-2017
Call H2020-EEB-2017 (subcall de: H2020-EEB-2016-2017)
CALL FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS
Orçamento 54,88 M€
Specific Challenge:
  • The storage of thermal or electric energy needs optimised operational technical solutions in order to better manage and synchronise the overall supply and demand (at residential, district and urban level). Good management of the peak loads, especially stemming from an increase of renewable energy production, would reduce the overall energy consumption and the cost of operation of the installations.
  • Hybrid solutions are needed, inherently addressing the seamless conversion and integration of renewable electricity and heat, as to anticipate the future energy grid that will fully allow an exchange of different energy carriers. Such hybrid solutions form a next step in the electrification of the heat supply market.
  • To go beyond current state of the art on thermal storage (i.e. compact systems) for residential buildings, it is necessary to bring research activities in this field closer to pre-commercial stage, to demonstrate their technical and economic viability, and to optimise the operation of such hybrid solutions in view of combining them with the surplus of renewable electricity with low temperature heat and cooling demand.
  • In the EU, there are nowadays just a few examples of operationally integrated solutions for the optimal interaction in district networks, combining both electricity and heat/cooling energy supply and storage.
  • Efficient use of renewable energy in hybrid systems for the storage and generation of energy needs to be achieved.

Scope
:

Proposals should develop advanced innovative high-density hybrid energy storage devices, targeting the efficient use and further increase of renewable energy in the built environment, and demonstrating its value in terms of flexibility in the energy systems. They should address both electrical and thermal applications and able to reach a rapid release.

Such hybrid approaches encompass different aspects, which may be addressed separately or coherently:

  • high efficiency conversion and storage of surplus renewable electricity into heat;
  • multifunctional use in both heating and cooling applications at different temperature grades;
  • different time scales, e.g. in seasonal storage of high temperature solar heat and peak-shaving in lower temperature heat–pump applications.

Research and innovation activities should address:

  • electricity applications, where the technologies covered may include batteries, flywheels and capacitors suitable for applications in the power range of several tens of KW to 1 MW as well as other technologies related to storage of large-scale power needed for district areas.
  • thermal applications, where these hybrid solutions should develop the high efficiency conversion and storage of surplus renewable electricity into heat. The hybrid system should take into account the optimal ²integration of various potential heat storage media. Therefore, preference will be given to systems that exploit chemisorption or physisorption technologies (solid/ liquid) and/or latent heat (PCM). The innovation part of the project should include the possibility that energy systems may be connected, and of merging energy from different sources, e.g. renewable electricity combined preferably with electric storage and heat, industrial waste heat, heat grids, ground systems.

Proposals are expected to cover the various aspects of the overall system, such as design, storage materials, interfaces with various components and auxiliaries (heat exchangers, reactor etc) and include monitoring and control of the overall technologies/ components (BEMS).

Proposals should preferably include demonstration pilots for both residential and district connected buildings in at least two different climatic regions. They also need to integrate strategies for optimal interaction with the energy grid, and assess the value of this integration in view of flexibility in the energy system.

Activities are expected to focus on Technology Readiness Levels 4 to 6.

A significant participation of SMEs with R&D capacities is encouraged.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 4 and 6 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requiring other amounts.

Expected Impact:

For residential buildings which are not connected to District Heating and Cooling

  • Demonstration of the economic viability of the overall storage systems when operating in real conditions in residential buildings with a return of investment period of 9-10 years and proof of the potential for market penetration.
  • Technologies which are reliable and ensure a minimum of 20 years life time
  • Solutions compatible with existing building configurations – with compact systems using limited spaces in existing building (volume of storage limited to 3 m3).
  • Demonstration of an overall net energy reduction by 20 %.
  • Validated contribution to energy system flexibility

.

For residential buildings connected to District Heating and Cooling

  • Demonstration of the economic viability of the overall storage systems with return of investment of less than 20 years and proof of the potential for market penetration.
  • Technologies which are reliable and operating for a minimum of 30 years.
  • Provide compact systems (volume of storage limited to 1 m3).
  • Overall net energy gain of minimum 30%.

Proposals should include a business case and exploitation strategy, as outlined in the Introduction to the LEIT part of this Work Programme.

FOF-06-2017New product functionalities through advanced surface manufacturing processes for mass productiond.l. 19-01-2017
Call H2020-FOF-2017 (subcall de: H2020-IND-CE-2016-17)
CALL FOR FACTORIES OF THE FUTURE
Orçamento 120,18 M€
Specific Challenge:

As a response to increasing competition in global markets, many industrial sectors (e.g. automotive, aerospace, tooling or packaging) aim at improving their product performances through surface functionalisation. As the products are increasingly complex in terms of scale (from nano to macro) and shape, processes need to deliver efficiently, ensuring an uncompromised quality together with high versatility and controlled costs. One way to reach this goal is to differentiate between a product body and its surface, where specific properties can be tailored. Furthermore, the required functionalities may be achieved with little or no addition of new raw material. For example, modifications in the surface geometry or even microstructure induced by texturing processes enable to improve the performance of those products by providing them with dedicated functionalities such as tailored friction, antibacterial properties, aesthetic issues or self-cleaning capabilities, among others.

In this context, substantial research is needed for exploring innovative approaches aimed at producing high added-value functional surfaces by a superficial modification of the substrate. Special attention should be paid to the cost efficiency of the novel surface manufacturing processes and to the development of technologies that are adaptable and up-scalable to real scale conditions and to their implementation into mass production conditions. Finally, environmental aspects of the processes should also be addressed.

Scope:

The proposal should address surface-modifying methods which do not alter the chemical composition of the surface or add an extra layer of a different material, for example: micro-machining, texturing, photon-based technologies, laser, mechanical treatments, etc. These methods should be used to create new manufacturing processes that can be applied on mass production lines. Due to the need for cost-effective technologies, these processes should be easy to integrate within the existing manufacturing plants and cost-effectiveness should be demonstrated. The research activities should be multi-disciplinary and address all of the following issues:

  • Development of cost-efficient, up-scalable and adaptable surface processing techniques that introduce micro- or nano-scale modifications at the surface level of the part providing it with specific properties or capabilities.
  • Design and implementation of specific methods and systems that enable highly efficient up-scaling of the developed processing techniques from laboratory scale to real scale, with a specific objective to apply the processes for mass production.
  • Implementation of modelling tools to support selection of the processing parameters that lead to the targeted surface modifications.
  • Solutions which are economically viable, environmentally friendly and easy to transfer to other fields than the demonstrated fields of application.
  • In-process inspection and monitoring possibilities to ensure that the final results remain within the quality requirements.

The projects are expected to cover applied research but also demonstration activities, such as testing a prototype in a simulated operational environment. The ability of the demonstration activities to validate a technology’s high level of readiness will be reflected in the evaluation.

Activities are expected to focus on Technology Readiness Levels 4 to 6.

This topic is particularly suitable for SMEs.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 3 and 5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

The developed innovative product functionalities should lead to a remarkable impact for both producers and users, in the following terms:

  • Cost increase pertaining to those functionalities integrated into products should be below 10% with respect to the cost of conventional products .
  • The improvement in the product performance should be above 20% in the targeted functionalities such as: surface friction (increase or decrease), wear resistance, surface energy, corrosion and thermal resistance, hardness, self-cleaning properties, conductivity, anti-fouling, catalytic properties, etc. Besides, the improvement can also consist in obtaining tailored optical properties including for aesthetic or functional purposes.
  • Strengthened global position of European manufacturing industry through the intensive implementation of innovative and unconventional technologies along the European manufacturing value chain.

Proposals should include a business case and exploitation strategy, as outlined in the Introduction to the LEIT part of this Work Programme.

FOF-08-2017In-line measurement and control for micro-/nano-enabled high-volume manufacturing for enhanced reliabilityd.l. 19-01-2017
Call H2020-FOF-2017 (subcall de: H2020-IND-CE-2016-17)
CALL FOR FACTORIES OF THE FUTURE
Orçamento 120,18 M€
Specific Challenge:

Rapid developments in micro-/nano-technologies require complex business models that respond to volatile markets in demand for faster product delivery with an unprecedented yield and quality. High-volume manufacturing is not spared from these requirements, and will in fact need to demonstrate a productivity improvement compared to lab-scale process development and low-volume manufacturing in order to remain commercially competitive.

The process scaling needs to include system-level architectures for metrology and control. This includes data acquisition and control at the levels of the process, the physical handling and the component validation. The in-line metrology and inspection for micro-/nano-production play an important role, together with a common reference system and approach across process chain. The evolution of the control system on the factory floor will also need to show various levels of distributed control in order to cover both batch-to-batch and run-to-run variations with real-time parameter prediction and feedback.

Practical industry solutions for reference metrology at these small dimensions are not readily available. However, whilst efforts are made towards producing reference materials, reliable and fast measurements that allow for control both at the process level and at the higher level of product vehicle or line, are needed. This will enable predictive management of batches, improved quality and speed control, and machine learning enabling fully autonomous control at the level of the process tool.

Scope:

Proposals should include a systems-level strategy for integrating measurement and control throughout the production line for micro-/(nano-)enabled high volume manufacturing. To address this challenge the proposal will need to cover all of the following areas:

  • Measurement techniques that target highly integrated and functional products at the micro- (and nano-)scale.
  • Measurement and data acquisition which are non-destructive, i.e. no waste material at the measurement steps, and allow for high throughput scenarios in their respective industrial settings.
  • Traceability in the measurements back to reference samples (e.g. calibrated standard artefacts and products). Direct contributions to related standards may be a part of the proposal.
  • Approaches to control at the different levels of factory integration, including process variation, product/component reliability, waste optimisation, yield/output improvements and predictive/preventive corrections to the entire line.

Activities are expected to focus on Technology Readiness Levels 5 to 7 and to be centred around TRL6.

This topic addresses cross-KET activities.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 4 and 6 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

The developed new technologies should lead to a significant impact in the following terms:

  • Improvement in existing manufacturing processes through implementation of system-wide control systems, demonstrating better resource efficiency, yield and productivity of a wide variety of components and final products.
  • Improvement in technical knowledge on the in-line metrology for micro-/(nano-)sized components in a high-volume manufacturing setting.
  • Accelerated uptake by industry of in-line measurements and related control systems that allow for traceability in terms of physical dimensions, functionality and reliability of micro-/nano-sized components.
  • Contribution to standardisation in the field of reference materials targeting micro-/(nano-) technology and factory integration.

Proposals should include a business case and exploitation strategy, as outlined in the Introduction to the LEIT part of this Work Programme.

FOF-09-2017Novel design and predictive maintenance technologies for increased operating life of production systemsd.l. 19-01-2017
Call H2020-FOF-2017 (subcall de: H2020-IND-CE-2016-17)
CALL FOR FACTORIES OF THE FUTURE
Orçamento 120,18 M€
Specific Challenge:

The elevated complexity and costs of production assets combined with the requirements for high-quality manufactured products necessitate novel design and reliability-based maintenance approaches that are able to provide the required levels of availability, maintainability, quality, safety while considering the system as a whole and throughout the production lifecycle.

Analysis of operational parameters and in-service behaviour, self-learning features and condition prediction mechanisms could contribute to improve smart predictive maintenance systems capable to integrate information from many different sources and of various types, in order to more accurately estimate the process performances and the remaining useful life. That will lead to a more efficient management, reconfiguration and re-use of assets and resources, avoiding false alarms and unforeseen failures which lower operators' confidence in such systems.

Scope:

The aim would be to design optimal maintainability solutions into production systems to improve operating life at maximised performance and reduce costs by carrying out maintenance activities at the most optimised time before failure occurs, thus minimising the degree of intervention required and maximising the system availability.

More trustworthy predictive maintenance and cause-and-effect analysis techniques should be developed to aggregate and interpret data captured from production systems and effectively share the massive amount of information between users. Measurements of a range of parameters at the level of components, machines and production systems should be carried out to provide data for building trend reference models for prediction of equipment condition, to improve physically-based models and to synchronise maintenance with production planning and logistics options. The dependability of the techniques would be demonstrated for a range of components and machines.

While the focus will be on demonstrating the design approaches and maintenance technologies, R&D activities supporting the integration and scale-up are expected as well.

Demonstration activities should address all of the following areas:

  • Methodologies and tools for improved maintainability and increased operating life of production systems.
  • Methodologies and tools to schedule maintenance activities together with production activities.
  • Predictive maintenance solutions, combined with integrated quality-maintenance methods and tools, as well as failure modes, effects, and criticality analysis (FMECA) techniques, that effectively share information among different data sources in a secure way. Exploitation of networks of Smart Objects Technologies is an option.
  • Versatility, in order to make solutions transferable to different industrial sectors.
  • The project must include two complex demonstrators in real industrial settings to represent a clear added value.

In order to ensure the industrial relevance and impact of the demonstration effort, the active participation of industrial partners, including SMEs, represents an added value to the activities.

Activities are expected to focus on Technology Readiness Levels 5 to 7 and to be centred around TRL6.

This topic addresses cross-KET activities.

This topic is particularly suitable for SMEs, as well as for international cooperation.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 4 and 6 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

The developed new technologies should lead to a significant impact in the following terms:

  • 10% increased in-service efficiency through reduced failure rates, downtime due to repair, unplanned plant/production system outages and extension of component life.
  • More widespread adoption of predictive maintenance as a result of the demonstration of more accurate, secure and trustworthy techniques at component, machine and system level
  • Increased accident mitigation capability.

Proposals should include a business case and exploitation strategy, as outlined in the Introduction to the LEIT part of this Work Programme.

FOF-10-2017New technologies and life cycle management for reconfigurable and reusable customised productsd.l. 19-01-2017
Call H2020-FOF-2017 (subcall de: H2020-IND-CE-2016-17)
CALL FOR FACTORIES OF THE FUTURE
Orçamento 120,18 M€
Specific Challenge:

New customised products will be increasingly incorporating, in a seamless fashion, intelligence and smart functionalities through advanced materials and embedded components. The integration of highly differentiated materials and components is a key requisite for flexible manufacturing of individualised consumer/customised products. On the other hand, enhanced integration of sophisticated ICT-based components and of advanced materials implies a rapid product obsolescence rate, and can thus introduce further pollution risks if reuse of products and/or components is not improved. Therefore, reconfiguration and reuse of products, and related services, need to be developed.

Scope:

To face sustainability and flexibility challenges customised products need to be conceived, designed and manufactured in a modular way, and their single components have to be developed so as to be interoperable with one another during the product/service lifetime, so as to be exchangeable and updateable whenever necessary. This influences both the hard and soft requirements and calls for new production technologies that enable the fast manufacturing, assembly and configuration of complex products, as well as the products updatability and disassembly for re-use and end of life management.

In particular, consumer goods manufacturers should be able easily and effectively to integrate products and components which can be independently designed, produced and used in order to make diverse final personalised products in different production systems.

All involved actors in the product life cycle, from manufacturers of basic products components to retailers and vendors up to the final customers, should be provided with the needed hard and soft tools to reassemble and/or reconfigure the product or its components.

Research activities should address all of the following areas:

  • Methodologies, engineering and tools for the fast reconfiguration and re-use of personalised products and their components
  • New production techniques allowing for a fast manufacturing, assembly and configuration of complex personalised products
  • Innovative methods and technologies for personalised products updatability, disassembly for reuse and end of life management of the products as well as their different components
  • Methodologies and tools for the development of assembly, configuration, disassembly and reconfiguration services along the whole consumer/customised products value chain and along its overall life cycle also including the aftersale stage.

The proposals are expected to include use-case demonstrations aiming at the rapid deployment of the new modularity, reconfiguration and re-use of personalised consumer/customised products and life cycle management. All relevant value-chain stakeholders are expected to participate, including relevant Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) practitioners.

The resulting personalised products are expected to satisfy the final consumer needs at an individual level and consequently to facilitate daily life (particularly concerning elderly, disabled or other target groups with special needs) or improve workers and sportsmen safety and health.

Activities are expected to focus on Technology Readiness Levels 5 to 7 and to be centred around TRL6.

This topic addresses cross-KET activities.

This topic is particularly suitable for SMEs.

This topic is particularly suitable for collaboration at international level, especially regarding the involvement of multiple actors in complex value chains on a global scale for consumer/customised goods.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 4 and 6 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

The developed new technologies should lead to a significant impact in terms of:

  • Reduction of time to market of new personalised products/services by 30% through a modular product/service design and manufacturing approach
  • Cost reduction of the manufacturing of personalised products by 25% by decreasing lead times in product-services development and configuration
  • Reduction of environmental impact by more than 50% due to modular reusable components and final products
  • Savings of overall products/services life cycle costs by 30% as a consequence of the reusability and re-adaptability of the components of the personalised products
  • Wide adoption of the technologies developed leading to increasingly flexible manufacturing of customised products

Proposals should include a business case and exploitation strategy, as outlined in the Introduction to the LEIT part of this Work Programme.

FOF-12-2017ICT Innovation for Manufacturing SMEs (I4MS)d.l. 19-01-2017
Call H2020-FOF-2017 (subcall de: H2020-IND-CE-2016-17)
CALL FOR FACTORIES OF THE FUTURE
Orçamento 120,18 M€
Specific Challenge:

For Europe's competitiveness in manufacturing, it is crucial that advances in ICT are taken up in engineering and manufacturing "at large" as soon as they have the appropriate maturity level. The topic will support fast adoption, and wide spread technology transfer of advanced ICT-based solutions for manufacturing across the business process chains – from "cradle to grave".

Scope:

As Phase 3 of I4MS (www.i4ms.eu) this topic addresses the adoption of the next generation of ICT advances in the manufacturing domain. Focus is on emerging innovative technologies and processes, which need to be customised, integrated, tested and validated before being released on the market. Special emphasis is on strengthening European SMEs and mid-caps along the value chain by adopting new concepts linked to innovative business and/or service models, and bringing them into contact with actors that can provide access to finance and access to advanced training to reskill workers.

a. Innovation actions must address all of the following three aspects.

  1. Establishing across Europe networks of multidisciplinary competence centres offering “marketplaces” for companies that want to experiment with digital technologies in manufacturing of discrete or continuous goods. Centres should have the capacity to offer access to technology platforms and skills for developing and testing innovative technologies and applications, including access to design and manufacturing, rapid prototyping and equipment assessment initiatives. They should also act as brokers between suppliers and users of the technology products. Competence centres are encouraged to link to existing/emerging regional (smart specialisation) or national innovation hubs. If Horizon 2020 funding is complemented by ESIF or other regional or national funds: Horizon 2020 funding shall be used for carrying out highly innovative experiments that will multiply the impact of local initiatives to a European scale, and will build partnerships between businesses in Europe.
  2. Carrying out a critical mass of cross-border experiments bringing together different key actors along the full value chain to customise the technologies according to the requirements of the users. Driven by the requirements of first-time users, Application Experiments bring together the actors of the value chain and the experts necessary to enable new users to develop novel products or services and assist them in customising and applying these in their respective environments. Experiment descriptions in proposals should include an outline of the initial exploitation plan and business scenario, which will be developed further in the proposed experiment. To remain flexible on which experiments will be carried out, the action may involve financial support to third parties, in line with the conditions set out in part K of the General Annexes. The consortium will define the selection process of additional users and suppliers running the experiments for which financial support will be granted (typically in the order of EUR 20 000 – 100 000[[In line with Article 23 (7) of the Rules for Participation the amounts referred to in Article 137 of the Financial Regulation may be exceeded, and if this is the case proposals should explain why this is necessary to achieve the objectives of the action.]] per party). Maximum 50% of the EU funding can be allocated to this purpose[[It is recommended to also use established networks reaching out to SMEs like the Enterprise Europe Network and the NCP network for calls publications and awareness raising towards SME's.]].
  3. Activities to achieve long-term sustainability of the competence centres and the eco-system. This includes the development of a business plan for the competence centres and the marketplace, of which an outline business case and industrial exploitation strategy should be described in the proposal, as outlined in the Introduction to the LEIT part of this Work Programme. In addition, investors should be attracted to support business development of SMEs and mid-cap actors in successful experiments. Training needs of the SMEs and mid-caps should be collected and shared with training providers in the eco-system, with the ultimate aim that sufficient training opportunities will be available for all companies. Such activities would include also dissemination.

Proposers should cover at least one of the following four areas of technologies for adoption in manufacturing. Proposers are encouraged to support the building of pan-European ecosystems of emerging platforms and are expected to collaborate on reinforcing the European I4MS ecosystem, and to establish links to related activities, e.g. in the IoT Focus Area, the Joint Undertaking ECSEL, and the SPARC or big data PPPs.

  1. CPS and IoT: Adoption and piloting of CPS/IoT in smart production environments, with special focus on scalable, modular and re-configurable automation systems across the process chain especially for SMEs.
  2. Robotics[[The area of Robotics within the I4MS scheme is complementing the areas RTD-FoF2-2016 and LEIT-ICT Robotics topics]]: New robot systems that are cost effective at lower lot sizes, with the benefit of long-term improvements in productivity, the ability to work safely in close physical collaboration with human operators; and that are intuitive to use and adaptive to changes in task configuration. Key for fast adoption is the availability of flexible and easy to apply material feeding solutions. Step changes to at least two of the following abilities are therefore considered necessary: configurability, interaction capability, decisional autonomy in terms of context-awareness, and dependability.
  3. Modelling, simulation and analytics: HPC Cloud-based modelling, simulation and analytics services with special emphasis on sustained service models; on providing real-time support; and on addressing comprehensively security and privacy issues at all levels.
  4. Digital design for additive Manufacturing: Supporting the broad uptake of innovative additive manufacturing equipment and processes particularly focusing on the link between design tools and production, changes in business models, process chains and stakeholder relations.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU up to EUR 8 million would allow the areas to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. At least one innovation action is supported for each area of technologies.

b. Coordination and Support actions

To advance the European I4MS innovation ecosystem the network is to be reinforced. The aim is to achieve broad coverage in technological, application, innovation, and geographic terms, and to link up with regional/national innovation initiatives, including access to finance and access to training. Its tasks and services shall include maintaining a single innovation portal for newcomers, including a catalogue of the competences available in the I4MS network; sharing of best practices and experiences from I4MS and relevant regional/national initiatives; dissemination; identifying new innovative ICT technologies that can benefit from this scheme, brokering between users and suppliers; leveraging further investment for SMEs and mid-caps to bring the results of the application experiments to real use in the company, providing support in finding training providers for reskilling the workers in the SMEs and midcaps. For these support actions, close cooperation with the European Factories of the Future Association (EFFRA), the newly established Knowledge Innovation Community (KIC) on Added Value Manufacturing and the CSA funded under the Smart Anything Everywhere initiative is required.

Expected Impact:

Proposals should address all of the following impact criteria, providing metrics to measure success when appropriate:

  • Exploration of new application areas for advanced ICT in manufacturing at large: Attract a significant number of new users of advanced ICT in the manufacturing sector, in particular SMEs and the mid-caps.
  • More innovative and competitive technology suppliers, in particular SMEs, both on the level of ICT and on the level of manufacturing equipment, able to supply manufacturers with new equipment, components, and tools for improved manufacturing and engineering operations.
  • More competitive European service providers through provisioning of new types of services; through strengthening the presence on local markets.
  • Creation of a self-sustainable ecosystem of competence centers, users and suppliers supported by services available through a marketplace, covering a large number of regions and their smart specialisation.
  • A critical mass of pan European experiments that demonstrate innovative, sustainable business models covering the whole value chain leading to quantifiable increases in market shares and/or productivity of European companies and/or industrial capacities in Europe.
NMBP-37-2017Mapping a path to future supply chainsd.l. 19-01-2017
Call H2020-NMBP-2017-CSA (subcall de: H2020-NMBP-2016-2017)
CALL FOR NANOTECHNOLOGIES, ADVANCED MATERIALS, BIOTECHNOLOGY AND PRODUCTION
Orçamento 8,40 M€
Specific Challenge:
Product production and delivery processes are seeing fundamental changes worldwide. E-commerce and the internet have revolutionized order and delivery – changes are still underway and will doubtless evolve further. Automation and new process techniques (such as additive manufacturing or 3D printing) are revolutionising the concept of the factory. New and inter-dependent value chains in process industries lead to new process pathways, achieving new levels of resource and cost-efficiency. Logistics chains are adapting to cater for these changes, but these are often ad-hoc developments.

Existing project funding contexts, such as the Factories of the Future and national programmes addressing the fourth industrial revolution, are implementing a research and innovation agenda along roadmaps oriented to integrating new technologies into manufacturing processes, increasing environmental friendliness. Similar strategic agendas exist for e-commerce and for process industries (SPIRE – sustainable process industries for resource efficiency).
However, little reflection has been applied to the way that these new forms of production and delivery will work together.

Scope:
This action should draw up a roadmap for supply-chain integration, addressing in particular distributed and customised manufacturing, along with the associated logistics. New supply-chains will be increasingly global. While including the global view, this reflection should focus on identifying roles and pathways for Europe's industry in particular.
Proposals should consider Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) aspects, in particular:  
  • use established economic modelling tools to develop and assess industrial scenarios to 2030, and possibly beyond; and  
  • address the role of consumers and users as active participants in the innovation process.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 0.6 and 1.2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

No more than one action will be funded.

Expected Impact: The project should deliver primarily answers to the following two questions:  
  • What scenarios can we expect for future supply-chains and in which timescales?
These scenarios should cover the major supply and production chains in industry today, for both discrete and process production.  
  • Which technologies need to be developed in addition to those identified in existing roadmaps?
It is not expected that full-scale technology roadmaps for all scenarios will be developed in the scope of this topic, but preliminary strategic research agendas would be an advantage.

Type of Action:
Coordination and support action.

The conditions related to this topic are provided at the end of this call and in the General Annexes.
NMBP-38-2017Support for the enhancement of the impact of PILOT projectsd.l. 19-01-2017
Call H2020-NMBP-2017-CSA (subcall de: H2020-NMBP-2016-2017)
CALL FOR NANOTECHNOLOGIES, ADVANCED MATERIALS, BIOTECHNOLOGY AND PRODUCTION
Orçamento 8,40 M€
Specific Challenge:

To optimally support pilot production, there is a need for a "European Pilot Production Network" (EPPN) that would act as a coordination platform in the area of nanotechnologies and advanced materials upscaling and pilot actions. EPPN would exploit synergies and maximise impact of the various investments, innovation programmes and financing from H2020, regional and private sources, ensuring cooperation with the Member States and Associated Countries and regions, as well as other stakeholders.
Scope: This action should support the development and work of a EPPN with a clear added value to current H2020 pilot activities. The coordination action shall aim in particular to actively identify best practise on maximising the impact of new and existing pilot line activities in Europe. The initiative, which is expected to last 3 years, will require close collaboration with relevant regional and national public bodies, industrial associations, technology centres, private investors and organisations. Sustainability of the networking activity beyond the duration of EU funding support should be considered.

EPPN activities may include:  
  • Mapping of EU, regional and national projects and pilot installations and their services, market opportunities and the potential users of these facilities.  
  • Mapping of EU, regional and national opportunities for supporting access to pilot facilities by SMEs/Start-ups and upscaling of new businesses and identification of any barriers, such as training, safety, standards or regulatory.  
  • Alignment with relevant EU, national, regional activities, such as National/Regional Access Programmes and EU Vanguard initiative including identification and adoption of best practise business models, IP management and marketing.  
  • Cooperation with regional-national brokerage events bringing pilot facilities, local companies and capital providers together, including dedicated training workshops for potential new pilot facilities and their users (funding for event organisation is not envisaged in the current topic).

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 0.5 and 1 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

No more than one action will be funded.

Expected Impact: The establishment and operation of the EPPN is expected to have impacts at three levels:
At Pilot line level:
Networking of individual pilot facilities to establish complete pilot ecosystems for key industrial value chains enabled by nanotechnologies and advanced materials; established and demonstrated examples of best practise business models, IPR management and marketing approaches.
At end-user level:
Promoting knowledge of EU, regional and national support opportunities, facilitating in particular SME access to pilot facilities. Successfully bringing pilot facilities, local companies and capital providers together, leading to the creation of new or scaling up of existing businesses.
At policy level:
Practical policy recommendations resulting from interactions with relevant regional and national public bodies, advancing the work of the NANOfutures Integrated Research and Innovation Roadmap (2013-2025) and the Multi-KETs Pilot Lines Final Report; Practical examples and recommendations directed to the relevant EU and National initiatives, for addressing horizontal barriers, in particular on funding and financing, but also including training, safety, standards, and regulatory issues.

Type of Action:
Coordination and support action

The conditions related to this topic are provided at the end of this call and in the General Annexes.
NMBP-13-2017Cross-cutting KETs for diagnostics at the point-of-cared.l. 19-01-2017
Call H2020-NMBP-2017-single-stage (subcall de: H2020-NMBP-2016-2017)
CALL FOR NANOTECHNOLOGIES, ADVANCED MATERIALS, BIOTECHNOLOGY AND PRODUCTION
Orçamento 15,00 M€
Specific Challenge:

Research and technology development at the interface of key enabling technologies has the potential to provide novel technological Micro-Nano–Bio integrated Systems (MNBS) platforms to enhance the ability to sense, detect, analyse, monitor and act on phenomena from macro (e.g. body, organ, tissues) to nano scale (e.g. molecules, genes). These developments have a high potential for facilitating personalised and preventive healthcare. However, the translation of laboratory proven concepts to the clinical environment involving pre-clinical and clinical testing, prototyping, and small series manufacturing is currently lagging. Business development and market growth are therefore still limited. The challenge is to bring new promising laboratory proven MNBS concepts for addressing priority healthcare needs from the laboratory to the clinic.

Scope:

The focus is on further development into a clinical setting of novel MNBS platforms, techniques and systems that have already been proven in a laboratory setting (laboratory Proof-of-Concept). These must pertain to one or more of the following:

  1. In vitro/in vivo diagnostics that are deployed at the point of care;
  2. Therapy monitoring at the point of care.

Proposals should pay attention to facilitate clinical data harvesting, e.g. for medical regulatory purposes and/or to enhance epidemiological monitoring of health and disease patterns. As relevant, the proposed activities should address sex and gender specific aspects[[See definition of the 'gender dimension approach' in the introduction of this Work Programme part.]].

Proposals should demonstrate clear compliance with applicable Good Laboratory Practice /Good Clinical Practice /Good Manufacturing Practice, and be consistent with ISO and other regulations (both national and European). The translation from the pre-clinical phase to early clinical testing, including design and pilot manufacturing in appropriate volume for clinical testing (small series), pre-clinical and early clinical testing is a necessary part of the work-up. Attention should be paid to the requirements for Health Technology Assessment (HTA). Standardisation issues have to be taken into account where appropriate.

Activities are expected to commence at Technology Readiness Levels 3/4 and reach 5-6.

A significant participation of SMEs with R&D capacities is encouraged.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 3 and 5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Proposals should address one or more of the following impact criteria and provide metrics to measure and monitor success.

  • Address priority needs in healthcare diagnostics and / or therapy monitoring, for the benefit of patients;
  • Provide affordable systems with unique features that address specific well identified requirements in healthcare;
  • Progress the development of advanced integrated MNBS based diagnostic health platforms, techniques or systems from the laboratory Proof-of-Concept to the clinical setting;
  • Establish a world-class European competitive industrial R&D and manufacturing competence in Micro-Nano-Bio Systems integration for healthcare diagnostics applications;
  • Strengthening the industrial value chain and progress to marketisation;
  • Early involvement of regulatory bodies and patients in the new developments.

Proposals should include a business case and exploitation strategy, as outlined in the Introduction to the LEIT part of this Work Programme.

This topic will be co-funded by LEIT-ICT and LEIT-NMBP within the context of a Cross-KET initiative for Health, for a total budget of EUR 15 000 000.

NMBP-04-2017Architectured /Advanced material concepts for intelligent bulk material structuresd.l. 27-10-2016
Call H2020-NMBP-2017-two-stage (subcall de: H2020-NMBP-2016-2017)
CALL FOR NANOTECHNOLOGIES, ADVANCED MATERIALS, BIOTECHNOLOGY AND PRODUCTION
Orçamento 187,47 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de Fecho 2ª Fase: 04-05-2017 (só propostas aprovadas na 1ª Fase podem concorrer à 2ª Fase)
Specific Challenge:

The development of smart materials has been gathering pace over the past few years to develop novel concepts for intelligent components and structures with integrated functionalities that are able to communicate and interact with their environment, store data about their condition and react accordingly to external stimuli. Research in the areas of biomimetic bio-inspired engineering and nanomaterials can provide several examples of the development of smart materials and has seen a significant expansion. Examples include materials that can alter their physical properties, (e.g. viscosity, shape, colour and more) in response to temperature, stress, electrical or magnetic fields, convert sunlight into electricity, store energy, etc. Smart materials have also been used extensively in sensor developments in aerospace and automotive applications with the aim of producing intelligent structures and components that provide information of their in-service conditions However, there are several concepts that have not yet been implemented in industrial scale. Such technologies include self-repair or self-healing materials, materials for vibration suppression, lightweight composites that can inform the user of any internal damage without the need of time consuming and expensive Non-destructive Examination (NDE), materials or structures that can undergo shape change either passively or by activation, Functionally Graded composite Materials (FGMs), energy storing components, etc. There is a need for predictive modelling of materials functionalities for those materials for which there are currently no accurate commercial or open-source codes available.

Scope:

Proposals are sought to address specific industrial needs and facilitate the implementation of smart materials for applications in transport, consumer goods and ICT. The potential extension of these applications to other industrial sectors such as e.g. oil & gas and petrochemicals will be an asset. The technical challenges to be addressed relate to the development, processing and integration of smart materials with new functionalities, as e.g. for: advanced sensors (nanosensor technologies), damage detection, self-repair, self-actuation, self-sensing morphing, magnetic functionality (for non-magnetic materials), optical functionality, sound and vibration damping, thermal management in ICT applications. Material concepts based on bio-inspired solutions can also be considered. Modelling of the properties of relevance to manufacturing should be considered and further developed. Although the materials most suited to such development are lightweight advanced composites from different material classes, (like multiferroics, polymeric, ceramic, glass or metal matrix composites, organic fibrous materials). It is expected that such smart materials may make use of the unique properties possessed by nanoparticles and therefore the development of nanomaterial based intelligent components will be within the scope of the call. The development of such material structures has to be accompanied by high resolution analytical tools that are able to simulate and characterise the materials on all scales and, moreover, to track and reveal their function –structure relations in situ. The functionalities of smart materials will require the identification of gaps in standards and future pre-normative activities will have to be addressed as part of the scope. For this topic proposals should also be able to demonstrate in addition to the development concept, the feasibility of such technologies in terms of cost, production and processing methodologies, reuse/recycling of materials at end of life and reliability. Industrial and/or additional experimental partners should ensure broad validation and adoption of both the software and the materials.

The implementation of this topic is intended to start at TRL 4 and target TRL 6.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 5 and 8 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

The implementation of novel smart material technologies is expected to pave the way for innovative environmentally friendly smart products:

  • Enhancing the market opportunities for European industries;
  • Improving consumer safety;
  • Reducing maintenance costs;
  • Improving resource efficiency;
  • Contributing to a future circular economy;
  • Improved understanding of materials properties based on theoretical materials models.

Enhancing the knowledge base in the EU not only at the R&D level but also at the manufacturing and production level, creating a highly skilled workforce with improved levels of job satisfaction.

Proposals should include a business case and exploitation strategy, as outlined in the Introduction to the LEIT part of this Work Programme.

NMBP-22-2017Business models and industrial strategies supporting novel supply chains for innovative product-servicesd.l. 27-10-2016
Call H2020-NMBP-2017-two-stage (subcall de: H2020-NMBP-2016-2017)
CALL FOR NANOTECHNOLOGIES, ADVANCED MATERIALS, BIOTECHNOLOGY AND PRODUCTION
Orçamento 187,47 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de Fecho 2ª Fase: 04-05-2017 (só propostas aprovadas na 1ª Fase podem concorrer à 2ª Fase)
Specific Challenge:

The current lack of stability in the markets does not create strong incentives for  long term investments in tangible fixed assets, and a quick response to market demand is crucial to market success. This calls for new business models to enable industry to adapt faster to market demand. At the same time, European industry needs to reap the full benefits of digitalisation, including a new generation of highly flexible production and process technologies and equipment, such as 3D-printing.

All European companies, especially SMEs, need to have access to technology infrastructure with appropriate manufacturing facilities to help them develop their innovative product-services from the early stage of feasibility assessment up to the fabrication of first series of prototype's products and purchasing is not always the best option.

It is also important to develop value systems that take into account the new extended supply chain from the early stage of the design process up to the end-of-life activities. In addition, the real production can nowadays take place anywhere in the world and leave Europe with unused or outdated production capacities. The current process does not take into account the economic, social and environmental benefits for Europe.

Scope:

Business models supporting the novel supply chains for innovative product-services would need to facilitate the flow of information on free utilisation capacity among service providers, which could be dedicated business set-ups for that kind of product-services, or just existing manufacturers with free production capacity at certain moments in time and business companies seeking short term solutions for their capacity shortages.

New equipment, internet, digital technologies and social media have the potential to support new supply chain models that are focused on business-to-business (B2B) as well as business-to-consumer (B2C) relationships, on improving the use of manufacturing capacity in Europe, e.g. by an innovative treatment of data flows on processes and products with the possible use of sectorial clouds.

Solutions should facilitate the flow of information on free manufacturing capacity among service providers (which could be dedicated businesses or existing manufacturers with spare capacity), as well as the flow and management of data in the context of the value chain.

The research activities should focus on all of the following areas:

  • New, adaptive business models, networks and configurations to optimise the integration of KETs in industrial contexts, in order to increase the leadership of EU industry in the global markets. The approaches to integrate KETs should lead to a new model for European industrial production and consumption, based on more sustainable and efficient production and consumption patterns, supporting increasingly customised sustainable products.
  • New business solutions for extended supply chains and the integrated sustainable European framework, which would take into account the needs of design, production, utilisation and end-of-life and overcome the risk of under-utilised capacity.
  • Solutions that would enable businesses in the supply chain to use new flexible production and processing systems tailored to their needs; to increase connectivity and inter-operability to rapidly coordinate; and to react to market demand as a whole system.
  • Solutions for local cooperation and supply, which can reduce the environmental footprint. These solutions should converge into high value-added production capable of responding dynamically to competing global economies demonstrating how the EU could benefit from international cooperation.

Project activities will focus on new concepts and methodologies for knowledge-based, specialised product-service, which can fulfil the requirements of fast changing markets for innovative product-services. The service could be supplemented by after-sale services and extended guarantees provided by any entity from the supply chain base on common agreement.

Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) elements should be considered, such as economics and business administration. In particular, proposals should address the role of consumers and users as active participants in the innovation process.

Activities are expected to focus on Technology Readiness Levels 4 to 6. This topic addresses cross-KET activities.

This topic is particularly suitable for SMEs.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 2 and 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:
  • Innovative industrial business solutions taking full advantage of the potential provided by the digitisation of the European industry; 
  • Decreased production costs in Europe, through a better use of the available manufacturing capacity; 
  • Reduced environmental or carbon footprint compared to products produced in traditional value chains, by the use of local and regional product-services capacity; 
  • Novel supply networks and solutions that could be applied across industries.

Proposals should include a business case and exploitation strategy, as outlined in the Introduction to the LEIT part of this Work Programme
.
PILOTS-03-2017Pilot Lines for Manufacturing of Nanotextured surfaces with mechanically enhanced propertiesd.l. 27-10-2016
Call H2020-PILOTS-2017 (subcall de: H2020-IND-CE-2016-17)
CALL FOR PILOTS
Orçamento 48,66 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de Fecho 2ª Fase: 04-05-2017 (só propostas aprovadas na 1ª Fase podem concorrer à 2ª Fase)
Specific Challenge:

Nanostructured coatings or nanotextured surfaces provide improved scratch and abrasion resistance, super hardness and mechanical resistance that rivals diamond in performance, improved wear resistance and corrosion inhibition, bio-compatibility, control of reflectivity, sensing ability, self-cleaning surfaces improving many products such as technical textiles and papers, structural elements for machinery, construction elements, transportation, etc.

Nano-enhanced functional surfaces have huge potential in different sectors, including packaging, marine, water treatment, electronics, building and construction, automotive, transport, energy and other applications including textile, leather and industrial engineering.

The involved technologies to manufacture these surfaces or coatings are currently at a lower TRL level, and call for up-scaling, demonstration and validation in large scale pilot installations in operational environments, before industrial manufacturing can take place.

Scope:

The proposed pilot lines should address the development, upscaling and demonstration in relevant industrial environments of reliable manufacturing processes to obtain nanostructured surfaces with mechanically enhanced properties.

They should use existing pilot lines as a starting point for development, incorporating new materials and methods and/or instrumentation with real time characterization for measurement, analysis and monitoring at the nanoscale to characterise relevant materials process properties;

The aim is to increase the level of robustness and repeatability of such industrial processes; to optimise and evaluate the increased performances of the production lines in terms of productivity and cost-effectiveness; and finally to assess the functionality and performance of the new materials/products.

Proposals should address the complete research-development-innovation cycle and obstacles remaining for industrial application, and involve a number of relevant materials producers and users, also considering the needs of SMEs.

Technology transfer should be prepared through technology services at affordable costs, facilitating the collaborating with EU SME and large industries, and the rapid deployment and commercialisation of the new technology.

Examples of possible developments include:

  • Upgrade existing production methods, extending current production capabilities of mass production injection moulding, or additive technologies such as Roll-2-Roll- and sheet-2-sheet printing, into the sub-100 nm regime.
  • Enhancing key properties of promising lab scale nano-enabled surfaces and upscale their production up to pilot level. Different technologies for nano-enabled surface production may be considered.
  • Applying such surfaces in sectors (more than one is preferred) where they may have strong social and economic impact.

Non-technological aspects key for the marketing of such products (e.g. standardization, regulatory issues, user acceptance, HSE aspects, LCA) need to be considered.

Activities are expected to focus on Technology Readiness Levels 4 to 6, and target Technology Readiness Level 7. This topic addresses cross-KET activities.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 5 and 8 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

The action is expected to lead to a direct economic impact on the economy of the manufacturing industry as well as society, resulting from issues such as increased performance and durability of wear-intensive industrial components, reduction of infrastructure maintenance costs, and reduction of operational costs due to energy savings.

Functional nanotextured surfaces and nano structured coatings have a huge potential for many sectors, and embedded nanostructured functionalities in coatings and surfaces can alleviate problems from ice, pollutant, UV, fire, heat, marine life, wear, friction and corrosion. These factors cost global industry billions in maintenance, loss and downtime each year. For example, direct corrosion costs account for 3-4% of a country’s GDP worldwide. The same for wear costs. Energy losses due to friction in mechanical contacts reaches more than 10% of the GDP of a developed country. More sustainable production as well as products can also be expected, including an environmental impact, from using eco-friendly nanocoatings instead of traditional lubricants for example.

Integration of state-of-the-art nanotechnology in the traditional production of coatings or surfaces will give a market advantage and enhance the competitiveness of European industry.

The new functionalities achieved will have important impact on many sectors, including packaging, marine, water treatment, electronics, building and construction, automotive, energy, textile, leather and industrial engineering.

Enhanced manufacturing capacities in Europe and/or enhanced market opportunities for European enterprises. These impacts should be addressed in particular in the outline of the business case and exploitation strategy to be submitted with the proposal. The expected content of this outline is further detailed in the LEIT introduction, section 6.

The impact should be presented at three levels:

  1. Impact on the consortium materials producers and users, and other involved industries, demonstrated in the form of reduced costs and full consideration of environmental and safety legislation.
  2. Other existing or new materials manufacturers, describing the expected impact from further integration of the nano-enabled multifunctional materials into practical large-scale applications with producers outside the consortium,
  3. Global impact in form of direct or derived benefits from competitive advantage of the new materials and products.

The impact will also be improved by a contribution to training and knowledge dissemination for building an educated workforce.

Overall the action is expected to help driving the demand in Europe as well as support the penetration of new markets worldwide. This should include clear benefits to manufacturers, including SMEs, and new entrants into the market may be expected.

PILOTS-04-2017Pilot Lines for 3D printed and/or injection moulded polymeric or ceramic microfluidic MEMSd.l. 27-10-2016
Call H2020-PILOTS-2017 (subcall de: H2020-IND-CE-2016-17)
CALL FOR PILOTS
Orçamento 48,66 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de Fecho 2ª Fase: 04-05-2017 (só propostas aprovadas na 1ª Fase podem concorrer à 2ª Fase)
Specific Challenge:

Microfluidics devices were initially based on non-polymeric materials like silicon or glass, manufactured in facilities developed for the semiconductor industry. New fabrication techniques that are completely based on polymer/plastic materials can lead to reducing fabrication costs and optimise time, including rapid prototyping methods for a new range of products.

A new generation of 3D micro and nano structured and/or injection moulded polymeric or ceramic microfluidic MEMS products are targeted. Applications may include MEMS for nozzles or filters, sensor applications, lab-on-chip systems, printed biochemical materials, soft substrates etc., and open for new applications, including disposables where production cost need to be kept to a minimum. The adoption of environment friendly material solutions may also be explored (e.g. biodegradable materials, materials from renewable resources, reusable/recyclable materials).

While typical features for the mentioned applications may be larger than leading edge semiconductor processes, the required feature sizes are nonetheless significantly smaller than what is available with current standard printing and injection moulding techniques i.e. micro- and nano-fabrication capabilities are required.

Scope:

The proposed pilot lines should address the development, upscaling and demonstration in relevant industrial environments.

They should use existing pilot lines as a starting point for development, incorporating new materials and methods and/or instrumentation with real time characterization for measurement, analysis and monitoring at the nanoscale to characterise relevant materials, process properties and product features.

The aim is to increase the level of robustness and repeatability of such industrial processes; to optimise and evaluate the increased performance of production lines in terms of productivity and cost-effectiveness; and finally to assess the functionality and performance of the new materials/products.

Proposals should address the complete research-development-innovation cycle and obstacles remaining for industrial application, and involve a number of relevant materials producers and users, also considering the needs of SMEs.

Non-technological aspects key for the marketing of such products (e.g. standardization, regulatory issues, user acceptance, HSE aspects, LCA) need to be considered.

Applications may fall within areas such as:

  • 3D micro and nano printed and/or injection moulded biological applications (including instrument on a chip, bio-medical/bio-physical sensors, Lab-on-chip, organ-on-a-chip, bio-compatible or toxic scaffolds, active influence of cell growth & differentiation).
  • 3D micro and nano printed and/or injection moulded polymeric or ceramic microfluidic MEMS for nozzles or filters, sensor applications, and multi-use chip (including also injection molded nanostructures in polymers).
  • In-line process control technologies as well as characterization methods needs to be included in order to meet recognised quality, environmental and safety standards and legislations.

The increased performances of the production lines in terms of productivity and cost-effectiveness should be demonstrated together with the relative improved functionality and performance of the resulting products.

SME needs should be catered for, e.g. through a coordinated network of pilot line, test and validation services, in order to prepare for management decisions to progress to the next step of new technology deployment, i.e. installation of industrial pilot lines and enter the commercialization stage.

Activities are expected to focus on Technology Readiness Levels 4 to 6, and target Technology Readiness Level 7. This topic addresses cross-KET activities.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 5 and 8 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

The action should allow for a new generation of MEMS products.

The scaled up production lines for 3D micro and nano printing and/or injection moulding in combination with the use of polymers and new micro- and nano-fabrication capabilities is expected to increase cost-effectiveness and robustness of the process and resulting products.

Direct benefit to the involved industries should be demonstrated in the form of reduced costs and full consideration of environmental and safety legislation.

Enhanced manufacturing capacities in Europe and/or enhanced market opportunities for European enterprises. These impacts should be addressed in particular in the outline of the business case and exploitation strategy to be submitted with the proposal. The expected content of this outline is further detailed in the LEIT introduction, section 6.

Impact should be presented at three levels:

  1. Impact on the consortium materials producers and users, and other involved industries, demonstrated in the form of reduced costs and full consideration of environmental and safety legislation;
  2. Other existing or new materials manufacturers, describing the expected impact from further integration of the nano-enabled multifunctional materials into practical large-scale applications with producers outside the consortium;
  3. Global impact in form of direct or derived benefits from competitive advantage of the new materials in products.

The impact will also be improved by a contribution to training and knowledge dissemination for building an educated workforce.

Overall the action is expected to help driving the demand in Europe as well as support the penetration of new markets worldwide, also considering the contributions to an improved quality of life from the resulting products (e.g. lab-on-chip, filters and sensors for medical or other applications), ultimately contributing to a significant growth of quality jobs.

This should include clear benefits to manufacturers, including SMEs, and new entrants into the market should be expected.

PILOTS-05-2017Paper-based electronicsd.l. 27-10-2016
Call H2020-PILOTS-2017 (subcall de: H2020-IND-CE-2016-17)
CALL FOR PILOTS
Orçamento 48,66 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de Fecho 2ª Fase: 04-05-2017 (só propostas aprovadas na 1ª Fase podem concorrer à 2ª Fase)
Specific Challenge:

On one hand the lifetime of electronics is becoming shorter, now approaching an average in the range of months; this evolution generates technological challenges and poses a growing ecological problem. On the other hand, paper is ubiquitous in everyday life and it is one of the cheapest materials in our society. It is renewable, portable, flexible and in addition cellulose, its main component, is the Earth’s major biopolymer and has an essential economic importance in Europe, which is responsible for 30% of the world’s total production. Paper Electronics represents a new concept which combines the use of paper as a functional part of electronic components or devices. Typical applications include packaging, graphics, novel diagnostic systems and hygiene products for indicating product safety or freshness, support logistics, health-care and safety for example.

Paper-based electronics shows promising technical, economic, and environmental advantages which will allow new recyclable electronics devices like paper displays, smart labels, smart packaging, bio-and medical applications, PoC devices, RFID tags, disposable electrochemical sensors among others. Paper-based electronics represents a promising source of innovation and growth for sectors such as packaging industry which develops smart solutions able to interact with the end users or classic paper publishing industry which are facing challenges from electronic books and journals, healthcare industry which intensify the development of quantitative biosensing, microfluidic and lab-on-chip devices.

Scope:

The proposal should address the physical, chemical and engineering challenges linked with the use of paper as substrate as well as active components of the electronic devices: it includes the development on new technologies for paper manufacturing (fiber enhancement, porosity, fillers, etc) and converting, new paper coatings (organic, inorganic or hybrid), paper surface characteristics and functionalization (nanocellulose functionalization, plasma or gas treatments, bio and chemical modifications for instance) but also heterogeneous integration of high-added value electronic components on paper and introduction of new materials (conductors, semiconductors, insulators, electrochromic, batteries electrodes). The proposal should develop high-precision, cost efficient, and high output printing or other manufacturing technologies on large area (inkjet, screen printing amongst others, and sheet-to-sheet or roll-to-roll processes). The proposal should also address recyclability and eco-design aspects.

The implementation of this topic is intended to start at TRL 3 and target TRL 5.

This topic addresses cross-KET activities.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 5 and 8 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:
  • To develop a new disruptive and sustainable paper-based platforms for electronics that not only integrate discrete devices but also use the cellulose as an electronic material for insulators, electrolytes, conductors, and semiconductors;
  • To use the same paper substrate that supports the electronics to also drive a bioplatform or a display, process source video data, or provide the power source through an embedded chemical battery;
  • Reduce the environmental impact of electronics;
  • Consolidate paper making industries and wood-harvesting industries;
  • In long term, the developed technologies should pave the way for active, full color, video-rate reflective displays that perform well in high-light conditions, achieving performance equivalent to classical electronics (i.e. for display devices, a contrast ratio from 10:1, reflectivity of over 80%, full color, etc.);
  • Creation of new markets and new business opportunities for the European industry fulfilling or anticipating consumer needs in this area.

Proposals should include a business case and exploitation strategy, as outlined in the Introduction to the LEIT part of this Work Programme.

SPIRE-12-2017Assessment of standardisation needs and ways to overcome regulatory bottlenecks in the process industryd.l. 19-01-2017
Call H2020-SPIRE-2017 (subcall de: H2020-IND-CE-2016-17)
CALL FOR SUSTAINABLE PROCESS INDUSTRIES - SPIRE
Orçamento 82,11 M€
Specific Challenge:
It is essential to take advantage of the significant potential benefits from new technologies and materials while ensuring that there are mechanisms in place to prevent, identify and manage any potential risks associated with certain use of such technologies.

The European regulatory process should also instil consumer confidence in the approved marketed products and encourage the reduction of production costs and the increase of efficiency, improving of the quality of products and services, ensuring worker health and safety, and protecting the environment in order to keep jobs and a competitive economy. At the same time, regulatory bottlenecks to innovation in the process industry should be identified in order to ensure that innovative processes, technologies and products in the areas of circular economy, resource and energy efficiency can be introduced on the market in a faster timeframe.

In addition, many production plants, companies and industrial parks are presently using their own protocols and standards, which in many cases do not match those used by other similar companies. This means that it can be difficult to perform cross-sectorial technology transfer and thereby achieve efficiency improvements.
Before any changes in policies are considered, a very careful and well-thought analysis should be undertaken in order to minimise the risk of potential negative impact on innovation and on the uptake of technology.

Scope:
A clear, consistent and predictable regulatory framework is needed, as well as a set of standards. Proposed support actions should cover the needs of the different industrial sectors representing big and small companies within the process industry. Their objective should be to identify and to propose solutions along the value chain, required to reach long term sustainability for Europe in terms of global competitiveness, ecology and employment.

The evaluation of current policies and regulatory or standardisation needs could include recommendations within the following areas:   
  • Re-use of different grades of wastewater for industrial purposes.   
  • Re-use of different types of waste (e.g. through re-classification) as feed for industrial production and/or energy sources.   
  • Recovery of valuable materials, metals and minerals from waste.   
  • Lifecycle Assessment methodologies to allow a harmonised comparison between industries and sectors.   
  • Production of advanced renewable fuels from the use of CO2 as feedstock.   
  • General harmonisation of the European Waste, Water and Energy policies.   
  • Eliminating bottlenecks for the transferability of new technologies across European borders.   
  • Eliminating bottlenecks that prevent the stimulation of investments in new technologies, e.g. within clean and low carbon technologies.   
  • New standardisation methodologies that facilitate continuous production.

While in some cases it is necessary to recommend harmonisation on a European scale through regulation and European standards, in other cases it may only be necessary to enable transferability of technology across sectorial boundaries.
Examples for this could be (but are not restricted to) the following:   
  • IT control systems and plant monitoring systems facilitating industrial symbiosis. 
  • Equipment for Process Intensification.   
  • Equipment for small scale localised production.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 500000 and 1000000 would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

No more than one action will be funded.

Expected Impact: 
 
  • Enabling regulatory authorities to better address the different relevant issues based on a better assessment and taking into consideration the different stakeholders in SPIRE.   
  • Rationalising the process to deliver standardisation mandates to the European Standards Organisations.   
  • Successful implementation of different policies, regulations and standards within the SPIRE sectors.   
  • Enabling of industrial symbiosis and better use of industrial resources.   
  • Reducing cost of operation for the process industry.   
  • International cooperation.

Type of Action:
Coordination and support action
SPIRE-13-2017Potential of Industrial Symbiosis in Europed.l. 19-01-2017
Call H2020-SPIRE-2017 (subcall de: H2020-IND-CE-2016-17)
CALL FOR SUSTAINABLE PROCESS INDUSTRIES - SPIRE
Orçamento 82,11 M€
Specific Challenge:
The Circular Economy approach is dependent on industrial symbiosis whereby waste and by-products from one factory are used as an input for other factories. Such inter-plant integration can be crucial to cut energy consumption (e.g. through heat/cold recovery) avoid waste and create a business case for by-products and gaseous effluents and thereby decouple the use of resources from economic growth. By further combining industrial parks and clusters with utility companies, it could be possible to create systems that are not only very efficient, but also produces much less waste than current practice and thereby reduce the environmental burden of industrial processes.

Imperative here is to remove regulatory bottlenecks to allow these flows and avoid double punishment of the companies. Future R&I should increase the performance and cost effectiveness of the above mentioned cross-cutting technologies, demonstrate them in real life, so as to remove the barriers and ensure they are widely deployed across all sectors.

While industrial symbiosis is increasingly considered to be an essential part of economic and environmental policy (notably the Circular Economy and COP21) and seen as crucial to achieve their objectives, given that over 20 % of all global resources are used and transformed in the process industries, the benefits and the dynamics involved needs to be better understood before the concept can be fully implemented.

Industrial symbiosis is currently most effective for directly recyclable and biodegradable materials and bioenergy. In the future Research and Innovation should support technologies that have the potential to broaden the basis for useful material flows, and should optimize inter-plant integration through integrated control systems, which exploit the benefits of the 4th industrial revolution. Innovation in feedstock mobilisation, renewable energy process technology and sustainable integrated process technologies could generate a huge leverage effect for competitiveness of European Industries by targeting at the same time decarbonisation, energy security, raw material dependence and cost, as well as have a very positive effect on local development. Industrial symbiosis requires engagement with regional and national authorities, as part of an overall strategy.

Scope:
Identify concrete pathways to facilitate and coordinate the implementation of new initiatives on industrial symbiosis. This should include an assessment of the mechanisms to create incentives for the industry and align it with the delivery of public and environmental benefits.

The proposal should analyse the implications at different levels (individual entities, local, regional and national level) as well as quantify the benefits. It should also elaborate the need for standardisation of methods for quantification of the benefits of industrial symbiosis, including joint protocols for control and ICT systems. The analysis should include considerations on infrastructure (e.g. thermal storage and distribution networks) as well as investment needs. Lastly, the analysis should cover the management (financial, legal etc.), which is a critical issue to the proposed flow exchanges between and among entities, located within the same industrial park/cluster or among entities at different locations.

Research, technology development and demonstration needs of industrial symbiosis should be evaluated. This should include both technological barriers (e.g. purity and amount of available resources, separation needs), and non-technological barriers for implementation across sectors and between industry and society. This should lead to the identification and mapping of the potential for industrial symbiosis in different regions together with the potential bottlenecks.

The action should actively seek to link with on-going projects related to SPIRE and build on their experiences.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 0.5 and 1.0 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

No more than one action will be funded.

Expected Impact: 
 
  • Identification of a list of best practices of industrial symbiosis, as well as new potential locations allowing industrial symbiosis in Europe, together with an estimate of the investment needs to unlock the potential.  
  • Better identification of essential technologies and dissemination of best practices for industrial symbiosis together with potential incentives that could support large-scale initiatives.  
  • Identification of an increased number of identified potential business cases based on the integration of "alternative" streams (such as heat, waste, by-products and gaseous effluents) from business and public entities.  
  • Evaluation of the potential economic and environmental impact (including resource and energy savings, waste reduction) of industrial symbiosis, based on LCA .  
  • Speeding up cross-sectorial transfer of technologies.  
  • Estimation of the potential reduction in operational and logistics costs from a wide implementation of industrial symbiosis in Europe.  
  • Best practice for the involvement of regional and national authorities.

Type of Action: Coordination and support action

   

ICT    <<    Espaço
COMPET-1-2017Technologies for European non-dependence and competitivenessd.l. 01-03-2017
Call H2020-COMPET-2017 (subcall de: Competitiveness of the European Space Sector)
Call - Competitiveness of the European Space Sector: Technology and Science - 2017
Orçamento 43,50 M€

Specific Challenge: The space sector is a strategic asset contributing to the independence, security and prosperity of Europe and its role in the world.Europe needs non-dependent access to critical space technologies, which is a condition-sine-qua-non for achieving Europe’s strategic objectives."Non-dependence" refers to the possibility for Europe to have free,unrestricted access to any required space technology. Whenever possible multiple (>1) sources for the critical technologies shall be promoted across Europe. Reaching non-dependence in certain technologies will open new markets to our industries and will increase the overall competitiveness of the European Space sector.

Scope: Research in technologies for European non-dependence and competitiveness has been undertaken within the frame of the Joint EC-ESA-EDA Task Force on Critical Technologies for European non-Dependence, launched in 2008. The Joint Task Force recently updated the list of actions for 2015-2017 .

Activities shall address technologies identified on the list of Actions for 2015/2017 focusing on those areas that have not so far benefitted from prior Framework Programme funding and representing the highest potential for being implemented through the types of action available in Horizon 2020.

Accordingly,the following priority technologies have been identified: 

•             U09 – Cost effective multi -junction solar cells for space applications. 

•             U16 – Space qualified GaN components and demonstrators. 

•             U17 – High density (up to 1000 pins and beyond) assemblies on PCB and PCBs. 

•             U21 – Very high speed serial interfaces. 

•             U23 – Development of large deployable structures for antennas. 

•             U26 – Space qualified carbon fibre and pre-impregnated material sources for launchers and satellite subsystems.

Technological spin in and/or bilateral collaborations should be enhanced between European non-space and space industries and proposals are expected to provide advanced critical technologies that are of common interest to different space application domains (e.g. telecom, Earth observation, science, etc.), or even with applicability to terrestrial domains.

Proposals should strive to go beyond the present state-of-the-art or, preferably, the expected state of the art at the time of completion if alternative technologies are being developed outside Europe. High level specifications and key requirements can be found in the list of actions for 2015-2017.

Proposals should include a work package dedicated to the development of a commercial evaluation of the technology, and should address how to access the commercial market with a full range (preload) of recurring products.

A maximum of one proposal per identified priority technology line will be selected for funding.

In projects to be funded under this topic participation of industry, in particular SMEs, is encouraged.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 2 and 5 million would allow this specific topic to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:  

•             Reduce the dependence on critical technologies and capabilities from outside Europe for future space applications, as identified in the list of Actions for 2015/2017 as part of the Joint EC-ESA-EDA task force on Critical Technologies; 

•             Develop, or regain in the mid-term, the European capacity to operate independently in space, e.g. by developing in a timely manner reliable and affordable space technologies that in some cases may already exist outside Europe or in European terrestrial applications; 

•             Enhance the technical capabilities and overall competitiveness of European space industry satellite vendors on the worldwide market; 

•             Open new competition opportunities for European manufacturers by reducing the dependency on export restricted technologies that are of strategic importance to future European space efforts; 

•             Enable the European industry to get non-restricted access to high performance technologies that will allow increasing its competitiveness and expertise in the space domain; 

•             Improve the overall European space technology landscape and complement the activities of European and national space programmes; 

•             Greater industrial relevance of research actions and output as demonstrated by deeper involvement of industry,including SMEs, and stronger take-up of research results; 

•             Fostering links between academia and industry, accelerating and broadening technology transfer. 

Type of Action:  Research and Innovation action

COMPET-3-2017High speed data chaind.l. 01-03-2017
Call H2020-COMPET-2017 (subcall de: Competitiveness of the European Space Sector)
Call - Competitiveness of the European Space Sector: Technology and Science - 2017
Orçamento 43,50 M€

Specific Challenge: Satellite missions with higher productivity add growing data requirements on missions. As a result high speed data handling, processing and transfer are required. These growing requirements are shared among a variety of applications, with a main focus on Earth observation and Telecommunication systems, and with applications also in Science and Exploration. Data challenges have to be addressed within the data chain on-board the satellites (e.g.processing, storage, compression, optimisation), between the satellite and other terminals that can be located on ground or air-borne platforms, on-board other satellites, and mission ground segment. In particular, next generation Earth observation sensors pose the most challenging requirements for data links(in the Gbps range), including links from orbit to ground and inter-satellite communications between different orbits and constellations, and including technology transfer related to very small LEO satellites (nano and cubesats),as well as direct ground link to very small LEO satellites (nanosat and below,including cubesats) considering optical technologies.

Faster processing, larger storage, and high bandwidth transmissions to users will be needed. Moreover, smart on-board data compression and optimisation will become a growing necessity. All these improvements will be required to efficiently support the next generation of data intensive missions. To support this future scenario, innovations must be brought to the payload data management system(including data optimisation processes), to inter-satellite links, to satellite-ground communication, and to the ground segment data handling system.

Moreover,within the context of preparatory work for the next generation of the Copernicus space component, mission concepts will be developed by European industry based on mature Earth observation technologies and solutions.

Scope: Activities shall aim at providing advanced on-board data handling and transfer for Earth observation and Telecommunication systems, and its management and exploitation in mission ground segment. These activities shall address the future challenge of high data rates transmission and significant improvements in data throughout:  

•             Re-configurable high data rate links including high frequency RF bands and optical communications: direct and interoperable links between LEO satellites and links to Earth and mobile or aerial platforms (including X band, Ka band and optical), or direct links between GEO satellites and Earth or mobile or aerial platforms, and inter-satellite links (beyond the specifications of the European Data Relay System – EDRS and its evolution in support to Copernicus).  

•             On-board data processing, implementation of complex data algorithms (e.g. by means of programmable Digital Signal Processors – DSPs).  

•             On-board data compression systems to improve on-board data storage (memory modules for new memory devices).  

•             High data rate image (optical and/or radar) and video processing, such as loss less compression, image enhancement techniques or on-board SAR image generation.  

•             Improved on-board data storage ensuring efficiency and reliability (management of memory modules for new memory devices). 

•             Anticipate how the ground segment will cope with higher data rates to improve the overall data throughout. In particular to address the required evolution of technologies, architectures,products, end-user expectations, including the challenges associated with optical ground stations for data uplink and downlink.  

•             Anticipate the need to link innovative ground segment architectures based on new ICT technologies,including cloud, in the “Big Data” domain and the rise in user demand for wide access to Near Real Time (NRT) and Quasi Real Time (QRT) data in social media and mobile applications.

A maximum of one proposal, exploiting NRT/QRT quality of data, with due regard to interoperability of interfaces to both innovative ICT dissemination architecture and applications, will be selected for funding.

In projects to be funded under this topic participation of industry, in particular SMEs, is encouraged.

The Commission considers that proposals addressing the full data chain (processing and compression, storage and transmission), or a coherent part of it, requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 5 to 7 million, and proposals addressing the rise in user demand of NRT/QRT data, requesting a contribution of between EUR 2 to 3 million would allow this specific topic to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:  

•             To provide elements for the high speed data chain management (including processing and compression, storage and transmission) and to support technologies for data intensive next generation of Telecommunications and Earth observation systems. 

•             Greater industrial relevance of research actions and output as demonstrated by deeper involvement of industry,including SMEs, and stronger take-up of research results including support to standardisation (CCSDS ). 

•             Fostering links between academia and industry, accelerating and broadening technology transfer.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action

EO-1-2017Downstream applicationsd.l. 01-03-2017
Call H2020-EO-2017 (subcall de: Earth Observation)
CALL: EARTH OBSERVATION
Orçamento 22,00 M€

Specific Challenge: Copernicus, the Union's Earth observation and monitoring programme entered into force in 2014 and produces a wealth of data and information regarding the Earth sub-systems (land, atmosphere, oceans) and cross-cutting processes (climate change, emergency and security). Copernicus data and information are mainly made available on a free open and full basis. This is expected to unleash unique market opportunities. It is important to foster market development exploiting the added value of integration of EO observation technologies (both satellite, airborne and ground based) with positioning ones and ICT (enhancing new frontiers opened by web) across different market segments through the development of applications, and encourage their insertion into the market.

For such applications and developments to succeed in the market, the product needs to be shaped according to users’ needs and their value to users must be openly demonstrated to the wider user community. This needs to be achieved in an environment integrated at the level of the user, in order for users to accept the innovative potential which the product promises. This will require also specific attention to be given to the various processes in place in the users’workflows which incorporate the EO information. Furthermore, the transition of R&D product prototypes to viable commercial product lines after the end of the EU funded phase remains a challenge to be addressed early on during product development.

Scope: Proposals may address a wide variety of applications stemming from the use of Earth observation and its smart integration with other related technologies.Copernicus should be considered as part of the solution which may include other space or non-space inputs. This is likely to lead to greater value,opportunities and especially market uptake. To this aim, a business model and a value chain market analysis, which includes the phase of the project following the end of the public funding, should be part of the proposal.

The outcome of this innovation project should be a commercial service platform, sustained by a production process capable to deliver to the user a product which is validated and accepted as a marketable product. Transnational collaboration has a key role to play in this context, as it enhances access to markets beyond the national borders, notably by enabling space application providers to absorb market-related tacit knowledge and know-how of their partners. Corresponding validations and customisations are to be undertaken, and the business case for the application is to be demonstrated. Service level models are to be developed, with appropriate quality of service definitions for the application.Application products are expected to adopt open standards for data documentation,data models and services including data processing, visualisation and cataloguing.

The choice of EO application is left to the proposer.

Proposers are advised to consult information on the Copernicus programme in general at http://copernicus.eu, and to consult further information on availability of Copernicus Sentinel Data, access to Copernicus Contributing Mission data, as well as issues recommended to be detailed in the proposals at the Commission’s website.

In projects to be funded under this topic participation of industry, in particular SMEs, is encouraged.

To reinforce continuity of skills, proposers could consider associating post-graduate researchers.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:  

•             Establish sustainable supply chains for innovative EO value added products and services with demonstrated commercial value with targeted client communities. Complete integration, based on international standards, into the customer’s existing business processes and processing chains, as well as the economic viability of the application is to be demonstrated;  

•             Enhance the European industry’s potential to take advantage of market opportunities and establish leadership in the field, and to boost business activity;  

•             Lead to new or improved products,processes or services on the market, by industry including SMEs, which are capable of generating, after the end of public funding, turnover and thus create new jobs. 

Type of Action: Innovation action

EO-2-2017Big Data Shiftd.l. 01-03-2017
Call H2020-EO-2017 (subcall de: Earth Observation)
CALL: EARTH OBSERVATION
Orçamento 22,00 M€

Specific Challenge: Effective access to Copernicus dedicated mission data and Copernicus service information by public and private users is a sine qua non condition forthe achievement of Copernicus' objectives.

In this context, Copernicus faces important challenges. First, the multiplicity of Copernicus partners involved in Copernicus dissemination activities requires both flexible and effective coordination. At the moment Copernicus dissemination infrastructure is built around different dissemination platforms operated by ESA, EUMETSAT, and service operators. In addition some Member States provide access to Sentinel data in the context of the collaborative ground segment. Second, the sheer volume of data and information to be disseminated and used puts Copernicus at the forefront of the big data challenges. This new paradigm requires a change of approach to data curation and dissemination, in the form of a technological leap to both ingest processing and make available the increased volume of Copernicus data and information considering both temporal and spatial resolutions. The Big Data paradigm offers new perspectives for data intensive activities where Europe could still close its technological gap with the US with huge industrial implications.

The free, full and open data policy will support the development of a strong Earth observation downstream service industry if an effective and scalable access system is implemented to meet the Big Data exploitation challenges and to address the full data cycle needs (e.g. standardised data query, retrieval, data exchange methods, processing and data fusion involving diverse datasets). Therefore,Europe needs to foster Copernicus access and dissemination services spurred by a vibrant European downstream sector taking advantage of the timely availability of the Copernicus data and information to provide innovative Earth observation information products on a worldwide basis, based on European Internet platforms using advanced big data technologies and serving a worldwide market.

The futureCopernicus data access architecture is expected to follow the following broadapproach:  

•             A back office service essentiallyensuring access to Copernicus data and information and offering storage andprocessing capacities.  

•             Different front office servicesmanaged by intermediate users (public or private) would serve the need of otherintermediate users or end-users via appropriate tool (e.g. search,visualisation, data analytics, knowledge extraction, animation of usercommunities, etc.  

•             Intermediate layers allowing the exploitation of the back office resources for the benefit of the various front offices as well as providing the necessary modules to foster EO data analytics and the chaining of value adding activities between different front offices.

Thismulti-layered approach would allow the mutualisation and efficient use ofstorage and processing capacities (generic or EO-specific) while providingflexibility to Copernicus services, Member States, intermediate commercial usersto engage with and serve their constituency with localised/specialised highervalue services.

Scope:Activities are expected to address the adaptation of big data technologies to Copernicus user scenarios and should concentrate on the intermediate layers describe above. They shall enable Copernicus services, public and intermediate commercial users to engage with and serve their constituency with localised/specialised higher value services.

Activities should include the development of tools allowing for the chaining of different value adding activities increasing incrementally the information and knowledge content of EO and non EO data and possibly triggering new commercial initiatives. The aim would be to allow many users either public or private to provide advanced services to intermediate or end users without having to buildup storage and processing capacities for Copernicus data and information but benefiting from the storage and processing services provided by ICT companies.

Big Data,activities shall bridge the gap between Earth observation and informationtechnology sectors taking into account the user needs for EO Big Data andaiming at developing innovative solutions taking into account the needs of 1)non-expert users like policy makers involved in societal challenges, 2) expertsinvolved, and 3) small and medium innovative enterprises. Activities shall becomplementary to activities enabled by the ICT and research infrastructureswork programmes which address generic challenges in the area of data mining,open linked data, web ontology, digital earth .

Activitiesshould address any relevant aspect of the data lifecycle which can solve EO bigdata challenges, in particular data management activities (e.g. collection,processing including online processing, quality control, documentation,dissemination, cataloguing, preservation, usage tracking, integration) andusage activities (e.g. discovery, analysis (including visual), productgeneration, user feedback, tagging, knowledge extraction, decision making).Activities are also expected to extensively use flexible coverage and openprocessing standards.

Activitiesshall rely on open source software/tools/modules/plug-ins and shall includesmall-scale demonstrations.

Proposersare advised to consult information on the Copernicus programme in general andlinked actions within Copernicus including the Integrated Ground Segment at theCommission's website . An information document is published together with thiswork programme .

Proposers are invited to consult further information on availability of Copernicus Sentinel Data, access to Copernicus Contributing Mission data, as well as issues recommended to be detailed in the proposals at the Commission’s website.

In projects to be funded under this topic participation of industry, in particular SMEs, is encouraged.

TheCommission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU ofbetween EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressedappropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection ofproposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:  

•             Enable value adding services ongeneric data and information storage and processing facilities which can allowpublic and commercial users effective production environment to interact withand serve their user base without deploying their own storage and processingfacilities.  

•             Make access to the Copernicus dataand information easy and user friendly through scalable dissemination andexploitation software based on international standards.  

•             Foster the establishment ofinteroperable access facilities to all EU Member States.  

•             Link with other big datainitiatives.  

•             Provide user community toolsincluding best-practices.  

•             Ensure resilience of the overalldissemination and exploitation system. 

•             Optimise the use of Copernicus databy non-traditional user communities to meet societal challenges. 

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action

GALILEO-2-2017EGNSS mass market applicationsd.l. 01-03-2017
Call H2020-GALILEO-GSA-2017 (subcall de: Galileo - Applications in Satellite Navigation)
Call-Applications in Satellite Navigation- Galileo-2017
Orçamento 33,00 M€
Specific Challenge:

The past 10 years have seen a wider and wider uptake of GNSS based user technology, initially with the Personal Navigation Devices in our cars and then with smartphones in our pockets. Nowadays this also includes tablets, laptops, cameras, fitness gears and wearable devices, etc. In addition, recent trends are showing that not only “every person” but in the future also “everything” will be connected and equipped with a GNSS device (e.g. connected vehicles and internet of things). This is opening a new generation of Location Based Services (LBS). The development of this new generation of LBS is driven by different needs, depending on the application: mobility, productivity, safety, etc. To satisfy these needs, the key requirements for GNSS are Time-To-First-Fix (TTFF), accuracy and availability. Galileo satellites will further improve signal availability, thus enhancing continuity of service for LBS in urban or challenging environments. By contributing to multi-constellation solutions, Galileo can satisfy the need for higher accuracy and fast TTFF of demanding applications.

The specific challenge of this topic is to exploit the availability of GNSS enabled mass market devices, developing innovative EGNSS applications that will:

  • Foster the adoption of EGNOS and Galileo in mass markets and ensure that the benefits will be captured by the users.
  • Create applications that will make best use of EGNSS innovative features such as better multipath resistance, authentication etc.
  • Contribute to the competitiveness of the European GNSS industry in the area of mobile applications, with special focus on the innovative role of SMEs.
  • Maximise public benefits by supporting the development of applications that will address major societal challenges in focus areas such as health, citizen safety, mobility, smart cities, sustainable resources monitoring and management, regional growth, low-carbon energy infrastructure planning and protection, climate action.


Scope:

Proposals should aim at developing new innovative applications, with commercial impact and a clear market uptake perspective. Below are some areas which are identified as especially promising for further EGNSS applications development:

Mobility as a service and Smart Cities: Development of EGNSS solutions for cross-modal mobility and new emerging “mobility as a service” approach should be addressed, in which the user does not buy a vehicle or a public transport ticket, but a service to comply with her/his mobility needs. This area may include innovative telematics applications in which the positioning, timing and navigation are used both to deliver the mobility service and to calculate a fair price based on the actual use of it. Development of EGNSS solutions for other areas of future Smart Cities are also included in the scope.

Internet of things: Development of EGNSS solutions for “internet of things” should be addressed, exploiting the interconnectivity of uniquely identifiable devices and the availability of their location. Proposals should duly reflect the fact that the internet of things is not only improving productivity and efficiency of organisations (with applications in almost every sector of the economy, from automotive to consumer electronics, healthcare or manufacturing and logistics), but that the internet of things technology is also changing our daily lives.

Commercial and social LBS: Proposals should address one of the two following application areas. 1) Applications for commercial LBS, such as: secure financial transactions; mobile workforce management, tracking solutions; augmented reality; social networking and sport. 2) Applications for social LBS, such as: safety and emergency (E112), e-health (health services more and more connected), and solutions supporting visual and mobility of impaired people.

For all the mass market areas, the development and innovation should build on:

  • Galileo features that improve performances in urban environment ;
  • Multi-constellation, fusion with other positioning techniques, including sensor fusion and innovative network fusion techniques;
  • Authentication services that will be provided by Galileo; and
  • Techniques to optimise power consumption.

Attention should be paid to socio-economic considerations such as consumer needs, consumer behaviour (including early adopters), lifestyles, as well due consideration should be given to applicable legal frameworks and ethical issues such as privacy and data protection.

EGNSS should be part and parcel of the envisaged solution(s). However, where a combination of EGNSS with other technologies is required to make the application(s) work, this is not excluded from the scope.

In projects to be funded under this topic participation of industry, in particular SMEs, is encouraged.

Proposals addressing PRS (Public Regulated Service) related applications are not in the scope of this action.

The Commission considers that one proposal requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 1 and 3 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.


Expected Impact:

Activities should aim at developing highly innovative and adaptive applications taking advantage of the Galileo and EGNOS added value. The proposal shall have a clear intention to commercialise the products and services developed, including a business plan. The consumer chipset and devices manufacturers (e.g. for smartphones and tablets) are mainly produced in non-European countries and the expected impact of this topic is to foster the competitiveness of European GNSS application providers that build innovation on these chipsets and devices, contributing to increase the overall EU competitiveness in the mass market. In addition, considering that the EU has a good market share of machine to machine chipset and module providers, the expected impact is also to foster applications building on this capacity.

Type of Action: IA
GALILEO-3-2017EGNSS professional applicationsd.l. 01-03-2017
Call H2020-GALILEO-GSA-2017 (subcall de: Galileo - Applications in Satellite Navigation)
Call-Applications in Satellite Navigation- Galileo-2017
Orçamento 33,00 M€
Specific Challenge:

Professional applications are covering different market segments. Precision agriculture, mapping and surveying have been the pioneers in the use of GNSS since the early years. The challenge is to make these applications more affordable, easy to use and integrated with other solutions and technologies, including for example earth observation, e.g. Copernicus services, in order to enable new targeted innovative solutions. EGNSS is offering additional accuracy and features, such as multiple frequencies and the high precision service in the frame of the future commercial service, contributing to enabling these innovative solutions, including in challenging environments. Power networks, telecommunication networks and financial transactions are today synchronised, many of them using GNSS. These networks are becoming more and more distributed (e.g. distributed power generation of renewable energies), interconnected and more demanding in terms of synchronisation performances (e.g. in 4G-LTE and future internet), or requiring authenticated solutions as for the financial transaction time stamping. The specific challenge is in this case to build on the enhanced capabilities offered by Galileo that will provide high accurate timing information and authentication services, to develop a new generation of high performing, reliable and EU independent timing and synchronisation applications that can cope with these emerging and demanding needs.


Scope:

Proposals should aim at developing new innovative applications, building also on the combination of EGNSS with earth observation and Copernicus services, with commercial impact or with satellite communication. Proposals should have a clear market uptake perspective. Below are some areas which are identified as especially promising for further EGNSS application development:

Agriculture: Automated machine guidance, precision farming and machine control and field boundary measurements are possible areas to be addressed.

Surveying and Mapping: Land survey, marine survey, cadastral and geodesy, and construction are possible areas to be addressed.

Timing and Synchronisation: Telecommunications, power generation and finance are possible areas to be addressed.

Other professional applications: clearly demonstrating amongst others the contribution of EGNSS differentiators, the potential of integration with earth observation data, and the future commercial potential are also invited.

For all the professional areas, the development and innovation should build on:

  • Multiple-frequencies E1, E5 and E6;
  • Galileo specific signal modulation, e.g. AltBOC;
  • High precision and authentication services that will be provided by Galileo, i.e. in the frame of the commercial service;
  • Fusion with other data, such as from earth observation satellites or other in-situ sensors.

EGNSS should be part and parcel of the envisaged solution(s). However, where a combination of EGNSS with other technologies is required to make the application(s) work, this is not excluded from the scope.

In projects to be funded under this topic participation of industry, in particular SMEs, is encouraged.

The proposal shall have a clear intention to commercialise the products and services developed, including a business plan.

Proposals addressing PRS (Public Regulated Service) related applications are not in the scope of this action.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 1 and 3 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.


Expected Impact:

Activities should aim at developing highly innovative applications taking advantage of Galileo and EGNOS aiming at decreasing the barriers to access such professional applications, in term of price of the solution and easiness to use, increasing the number of users and explore new innovative use of GNSS. Specifically for agriculture the expected impact is also to improve the productivity and decrease the environmental impact. For timing and synchronisation applications, the expected impact is to contribute to cope with emerging network synchronisation needs in terms of accuracy and robustness, while contributing to improve EU dependency from other GNSS.


Type of Action: IA

   

ICT    <<    Saúde
SC1-PM-16–2017In-silico trials for developing and assessing biomedical productsd.l. 14-03-2017
Call H2020-SC1-2017-single-stage-CNECT
PERSONALISED MEDICINE
Orçamento 46,26 M€

Research and Innovation Actions (RIA)

Specific Challenge: 

In biomedical, pharmaceutical and toxicology research, the safety and efficacy of biomedical products are ultimately tested on humans via clinical trials after prior laboratory testing in vitro and/or in vivo on animal models. The complete development chain of a new biomedical product and its introduction to the market is very long and expensive. Alternative methodologies to reduce the animal and human testing are needed in order to answer both the ethical issues and the imperfection of predictions issued from laboratory and animals when applied to humans. Computer modelling and simulation is currently used to a certain degree in pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics or mechanical simulations (e.g. fluid dynamics simulations). A research and technological roadmap for "in-silico clinical trials" is currently being developed. Preliminary results show the strong interest/potential benefit to expand the computer-modelling in drugs and other biomedical products including bioactives, medical foods research by developing new ways for in-silico testing.


Scope: 

Proposals will develop innovative in-silico trials for designing, developing and assessing drugs, radiation and other biomedical and bioactive products. They will build on comprehensive biological and biomedical knowledge management and advanced modelling paradigms in order to be able to simulate the individual human physiology and physiopathology at the biological levels relevant for the biomedical product under study (at the cell level, tissue level or organism level) and the interaction with the product, thus taking into account the variability among individuals (for example, molecular pathways, cellular microenvironments, microbiota, genetics, gender characteristics, behaviours, comorbidities, development, diet). Virtual populations of individual patients will be built for simple or composite diseases, for example, from the patient-specific models by variations of different parameters and will allow simulating the action of the products and predicting the treatments outcomes in order to develop a personalised medicine approach. The proposed in-silico trials will be the result of a multidisciplinary effort (e.g. within the fields of computational modelling, systems biology, tissue mechanics, biology, pharmaceutics, medicine) and will also explore and inform of the reasons of fails and suggest improvements. To help establishing such computer simulated trials, measures for validation (human trials, animal studies, validation in cell cultures) of the in-silico models shall also be included in the proposed projects. The benefit for human health, environment and animal welfare should be analysed and quantified. Contact with regulators and consideration of the regulatory framework issues are highly recommended.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 4 and 6 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.


Expected Impact:

- Reducing the size and the duration of the human clinical trials

- A more effective human clinical trials design

- Leading to a significant reduction of animal testing

- Innovative medical products on the market with lower development costs and/or shorter time-to-market

- Improving prediction of human risks for new biomedical products including medical foods

- Improving drug repositioning

- Potential of re-use of the developed in-silico models in the chemical testing.

- Setting standards for in-silico trials.

- Providing libraries of virtual patients that can be re-used in pre- and post-competitive testing of biomedical products

SC1-PM-17–2017Personalised computer models and in-silico systems for well-beingd.l. 14-03-2017
Call H2020-SC1-2017-single-stage-CNECT
PERSONALISED MEDICINE
Orçamento 46,26 M€

Research and Innovation Actions (RIA)

Specific Challenge: 

There is continuous progress in systems medicine, multi-scale modelling and patient-specific modelling aspects. But these opportunities have been inconstantly explored for the entire chain of health and disease. Thus, there are very few in well-being, prevention or rehabilitation while these areas are crucial for reducing healthcare needs, building sustainable healthcare and for assuring a healthy and motivated workforce. More, innovative methods are needed for better understanding and analysing brain, neurobiological and the gut-brain axis and the stress-related disorders or whole body data (e.g. where the development of multiscale and high spatiotemporal resolution imaging methods are critical) and their interactions with social, environmental, lifestyle, occupational, economic etc. factors that promote well-being and health. Well-being is a consequence of resilience to challenges and illness and of better prevention adapted to predispositions and behaviours (including gender), of better consideration given to the functional troubles, of better recovery and rehabilitation after illness.

Scope: 

Proposals should aim at the development of new integrative dynamic computer-models and simulation systems of acceptable validity, with the potential to being reused, build on open service platforms and with application in well-being, health and disease. The projects have to support computer modelling and simulations able to aggregate various information sets e.g. molecular, biochemical, medical imaging, social, lifestyle, economic, occupational, microbiome, environmental, developmental, psychological, gender etc. into robust predictors for resilience in coping with and overcoming challenges and stresses and for recovery after challenges and illness. They will process and apply individual/patient-specific information in a multi-scale approach required for integrating information at a certain biological level within a wider context (at least one biological level from molecule to entire body). Proposals will focus on multi-disciplinary research in medicine, SSH and ICT and should take advantage when relevant of existing large databases in clinical medicine, biomedical or occupational research, environmental sciences, Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH), so enabling and facilitating the accumulation and relinking of complex and heterogeneous data collections. The models integrated in these multi-scale and multi-disciplinary approaches will have their predictive capability validated by state-of-the-art clinical and/or laboratorial studies and/or against large health registries. Whenever relevant, proposals will integrate data collected over time in order to inform on individual trajectories with periods of well-being and periods of illness and on the heterogeneity of resilience and recovery that can be different during the individual lifetime.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 4 and 6 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

- Benefit for health and well-being: new personalised interventions for increasing resilience and recovery.

- Advancements in medical computer-modelling and simulation that takes into account time and spatial scales.

- Supporting predictive and preventive approaches in medicine, neurosciences and life sciences.

- Improving knowledge about well-being and association with life circumstances.

SC1-PM-19–2017PPI for uptake of standards for the exchange of digitalised healthcare recordsd.l. 14-03-2017
Call H2020-SC1-2017-single-stage-CNECT
PERSONALISED MEDICINE
Orçamento 46,26 M€

Public Procurement of Innovative solutions (PPI)

Specific Challenge: 

The use of interoperability standards is essential to the wider deployment of an EU eHealth single market. Despite previous Framework Programmes investments, there is still a profound lack of deployed interoperability between healthcare systems and services delivering healthcare and a need to stimulate the public procurement of eHealth solutions and integrated care services addressing complex organisational structures and interactions among people (recipients of care, care-givers, and others).


Scope: 

Proposals should address as primary aim public procurement of innovative solutions (PPI) to facilitate the deployment of an eHealth infrastructure taking into consideration the European eHealth Interoperability Framework and EU guidelines adopted by the eHealth Network. The PPI(s), and any accompanying innovation activities in particular by participating procurers themselves to facilitate the uptake of newly developed solutions, should focus on clear target outcomes such as allowing the sharing of health information, the use of semantically interoperable Electronic Health Records (EHRs) for safety alerts, decision support, care pathways or care coordination. The scope of the PPI(s) is to specify, purchase and deploy innovative ICT based solutions which can deliver sustainable, new or improved healthcare services across organisational boundaries while implementing eHealth interoperability standards and/or specifications (e.g. EN13606, HL7, Continua Alliance, IHE...).

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 3 and 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately.

Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.


Expected Impact:

- Wider uptake of eHealth interoperability standards

- Increased suppliers opportunities from wider market uptake of innovative solutions and services by forming a critical mass on the public demand side

- Better solutions specifications designed from a demand side perspective

- More forward-looking, concerted, public sector approach to eHealth interoperability

- Achieve the wider deployment of eHealth services

- Create a European role model in the eHealth interoperability field

- Increasing jobs in health and ICT and contributing to economic growth in the EU in the long-term

- Support forward looking, concerted public-sector investment strategies that benefit from jointly implementing PPIs across different countries around Europe.

SC1-PM-15-2017Personalised coaching for well-being and care of people as they aged.l. 31-01-2017
Call H2020-SC1-2017-single-stage-CNECT-2
PERSONALISED MEDICINE
Orçamento 28,50 M€

Research and Innovation Actions (RIA)

Specific Challenge: 

The activity aims at developing and validating radically new ICT based concepts and approaches for empowering and motivating people in need of guidance and care due to age related conditions, in cooperation with their carers where relevant, and to help them improve and maintain their independence, functional capacity, health status as well as preserving their physical, cognitive, mental and social well-being.


Scope: 

Proposals should develop a proof of concept of radically new solutions for a personalised "virtual coach", building upon intelligent ICT environments, access to relevant physiological and behavioural data, new forms of accessible interaction based on tangible user interaction concepts, open platforms25 and emotional computing. Usability and ease of user interaction should be essential design elements of the "coach".

The "coach" should provide personalised advice, guidance and follow-up for key age related issues in daily life which impact the person's ability to remain active and independent, for example diet, physical activity, risk avoidance, preventive measures, lifestyle and activity management, leisure, social participation and overall wellness. The goal should be to preserve physical, cognitive, mental and social well-being for as long as possible and to facilitate interaction with carers (where relevant).

Solutions should build on and apply multi-disciplinary research and include intelligent algorithms beyond state-of-the-art capable of reasoning, autonomous learning and adaptation to personal needs, emotional and behavioural patterns, conditions and preferences as well as the users' living environment and their social connections. Solutions should be integrated seamlessly in existing every-day activities and provide desired information in fast and efficient manner. Attention theft by ICT (consuming too much of the user's time) should be avoided.

Proposals should address relevant ethics and gender aspects and should also assess related legal and regulatory questions such as ownership of data, data protection/privacy, liability and consumer protection. It is crucial that users are involved and drive the innovation at all stages of design and development, including user acceptability, satisfaction and impact in realistic settings.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 3 and 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.


Expected Impact: 

The proposal should present methodologies and metrics as appropriate for measuring its progress towards the expected impact in:

- Usefulness and effectiveness of personalized recommendations and follow-up in terms of the goals of preserving physical, cognitive, mental and social well-being for as long as possible;

- Validation of non-obtrusive technology for physical, cognitive, social and mental well-being;

- Evidence of user-centred design and innovation, new intuitive ways of human-computer interaction, and user acceptance;

- Potential cost-effectiveness due to enhanced self-care, life-style and care management.

   

ICT    <<    Bio Economia
SFS-05-2017Robotics Advances for Precision Farmingd.l. 14-02-2017
Call H2020-SFS-2017-1 (subcall de: H2020-SFS-2016-2017)
SUSTAINABLE FOOD SECURITY – RESILIENT AND RESOURCE-EFFICIENT VALUE CHAINS
Orçamento 85,00 M€

Specific ChallengeResearch and Innovation Actions will focus on the design, development and testing of robotics systems for precision farming, including autonomous or semi-autonomous farm vehicles or sophisticated sensors and intervention mechanisms. The actions will prioritise technologies such as selective harvesting, more targeted weed reduction or environment friendly fertilization, and / or livestock management, based on better planning and targeted intervention, using sensors (local and aerial, even maybe earth observation satellite). This will also allow the tagging of agricultural produce or livestock for better traceability and subsequent big data processing, optimizing the whole agricultural process.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 2 and 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude the submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

  • significant increase in farm productivity with more environment-friendly processes (e.g. reduced water use, toxic substance use and soil compaction);
  • increase in the safety, reliability and manageability of agricultural technology, reducing excessive human burden for laborious tasks.

Type of action: Research and Innovation action

SFS-39-2017How to tackle the childhood obesity epidemic?d.l. 14-02-2017
Call H2020-SFS-2017-2 (subcall de: H2020-SFS-2016-2017)
SUSTAINABLE FOOD SECURITY – RESILIENT AND RESOURCE-EFFICIENT VALUE CHAINS
Orçamento 166,00 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de fecho 2ª Fase: 13-09-2017

Specific ChallengeChildhood obesity is one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century and its prevalence has increased at an alarming rate in the last decades. The main problem is that overweight and obese children are likely to remain obese in adulthood and more likely to develop noncommunicable diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular diseases at a younger age. An integrated EU approach to help reduce the impact on health of poor nutrition, excess weight and obesity is a political objective. A wide range of factors interacting at various levels are known to be associated with obesity. Overweight and obesity, as well as their related diseases, are largely preventable. Starting from an early age, diet and lifestyle have a strong impact on health throughout life. Therefore, the prevention of childhood obesity needs to be given a high priority.

ScopeWithin the context of improving the health of citizens and promoting sustainable economic growth, the main objective is to reduce childhood obesity and its comorbidities effectively. Proposals should focus primarily on specific target groups in the young (e.g., during pregnancy and foetal development, in infants, toddlers, most vulnerable groups in children, adolescents). To better understand the complex interactions between the factors influencing obesity in individuals and populations, it is necessary to combine the approaches and expertise from different disciplines (e.g. (epi)genetics, molecular biology, microbiome, gut-brain signalling, physiology, nutrition, physical activity sciences, information and communication technology, social sciences and humanities, education, environment, architectural and urban design, psychology). Proposals should consider a range of geographic, socio-economic, behavioural and cultural factors. Proposals should aim at innovative and efficient strategies, tools and/or programmes for promoting sustainable and healthy dietary behaviours and lifestyles. Proposals should reflect and build on existing initiatives and platforms and should provide a robust science-based impact assessment of the tools, strategies and/or programmes delivered for further consideration by policy makers. Tackling this societal challenge requires both interdisciplinary and multi-actor approaches engaging academics, policy makers, civil society and relevant industry and market actors. The gender dimension in the research content shall also be taken in account. In line with the strategy for EU international cooperation in research and innovation, international cooperation is encouraged, in particular with the US, Australia, New Zealand and Canada. Proposals should fall under the concept of the 'multi-actor approach'[[See definition of the 'multi-actor approach' in the introduction of this Work Programme part.]].

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 10 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude the submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected ImpactIn the effort to tackle the childhood obesity epidemic, proposals should show how some, or all, of the following impacts will be achieved:

  • Provide an understanding of which factors are involved and how they influence the childhood obesity epidemic.
  • Provide innovative, efficient, effective, scientific evidence-based and ready-to-use tools, strategies and/or programmes to improve sustainable and healthy dietary behaviour and lifestyles in children.
  • Transfer the generated knowledge and innovation to relevant stakeholders.
  • Strengthen interdisciplinary research approaches and foster participatory and inclusive multi-actor approaches for long-lasting implementation of the results obtained.

Type of action: Research and Innovation action

   

ICT    <<    Energia
EE-06-2016Engaging private consumers towards sustainable energyd.l. 15-09-2016
Call H2020-EE-2016-CSA
CALL ENERGY EFFICIENCY
Orçamento 38,00 M€

Consumers

Specific Challenge:

Consumers should be considered at the heart of the energy system and become active market players. The future private consumer should be more aware, active, energy sufficient, as well as being a prosumer producing energy for their own consumption, where this is possible. Furthermore, in view of the rise in energy prices, consumers are spending an increasing share of their income on energy, with estimates stating that more than 50 million Europeans are affected by energy poverty[[EESC (2013/C/341/05) referring to the European Fuel Poverty and Energy Efficiency project, 2009]]. Energy efficiency, energy savings and increased use of locally produced, including own produced, renewable energy are key tools in addressing fuel poverty.

In this context, engagement actions are needed across Europe in order to achieve behavioural change towards more sustainable choices and decisions for energy. This includes increasing and understanding consumer 'apetite' for higher efficiency products.

Although awareness on the benefits of collective consumer action in the field of EE and RES has increased in past years, such action is still hampered by a number of barriers, including financial and regulatory barriers and inconsistencies in grid integration practice. In addition, insufficient use of relevant ICT solutions and insufficient understanding of energy bills contribute to hampering the achievement of a more sustainable energy system.

Scope:

Develop and roll out tailored and effective and innovative engagement actions to motivate changes in consumers' sustainable energy behaviour that would result in reduced energy consumption in buildings, heating/cooling systems and/or appliances. The proposed actions should focus on clearly defined target groups of private consumers (individuals or collectives), using market segmentation[[Market segmentation: this involves dividing a bigger target group into subgroups of consumers with common needs and priorities, and developing and implementing specific actions to target them. As an example, vulnerable consumers may be considered too wide a target group and further segmentation would be expected.]]. The proposed actions should demonstrate an understanding of different types of behaviours and consider the different approaches needed to influence them. The actions should also address the risk of "rebound effects", propose measures to counteract them, and apply current theory and practice on consumer decision making processes (e.g. effects of new technologies on energy behaviour). All relevant stakeholders necessary for the successful implementation of the action should be involved and it is expected that relevant consumer organisations, in particular, are either directly involved or their support is clearly demonstrated in the proposal. Where relevant for the proposed action, gender issues should be taken into account, in particular the role gender characteristics may play in influencing consumer behaviour. Actions should preferably cover a wide geographic area through complementary actions covering various parts of the EU.

The proposed action should cover one or more of the following:

  • Empower and facilitate actions for consumers to become prosumers, or to form collective consumer groups/consumer cooperatives (addressing energy efficiency and/or renewable energy, and energy storage, where applicable, with a focus on action).
  • Support clearly defined groups of vulnerable consumers in tackling fuel poverty by facilitating more sustainable energy behaviour and choices in their everyday life, without compromising comfort levels. This should also aim at achieving structural changes of national policies to specifically address fuel poverty and could include the transfer of best practices for the active engagement of vulnerable consumers.
  • Facilitate wider deployment and consumer adoption of existing ICT-based solutions, for energy efficiency and information on energy consumption and costs, with a focus on action and resulting in improved understanding of ICT interfaces and information depiction (including smart metering and related systems).
  • Facilitate consumer understanding of energy bills (on and off line), leading to actions allowing for a reduction in energy consumption. Such actions should ensure robust monitoring to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach proposed,
  • Create better instruments for improving consumer understanding and routing purchase decisions towards higher efficiency products, ensuring high performance in the areas important to health and wellbeing at the same level of effectiveness and with no additional relevant environmental impacts,
  • Distilling policy lessons from the market insight gathered as a means to review existing, and produce better, legislation.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Proposed actions are expected to demonstrate the impacts listed below (wherever possible, use quantified indicators and targets), depending on the scope of the proposal:

  • Primary energy savings triggered by the project within its duration (in GWh/year per million Euro of EU funding);
  • Number of people changing their behaviour and taking informed decisions, documenting why and how changes are an effect of particular measures taken, as well in terms of the sustainability of the behavioural change;
  • Number of consumers engaged by actions aiming at improving consumer understanding and routing purchase decisions towards higher efficiency products;
  • Renewable Energy production and Investments in sustainable energy triggered by the project within its duration (for actions on prosumers/consumers groups, respectively in GWh/year and million Euro of investments per million Euro of EU funding);
  • Policies and strategies created/adapted to include fuel poverty (for actions on fuel poverty, to be measured in number of citations / statements from governance bodies).
EE-13-2016Cost reduction of new Nearly Zero-Energy buildingsd.l. 15-09-2016
Call H2020-EE-2016-CSA
CALL ENERGY EFFICIENCY
Orçamento 38,00 M€

Buildings

Specific Challenge:

According to Article 9 of the Energy Performance Buildings Directive (EPBD), Member States shall ensure that by the end of 2020 (2018 for public buildings), all new buildings are Nearly Zero-Energy Buildings (NZEB). However, progress is slower than expected and requires the development of market ready cost reduction solutions. Cost-effective integration of renewable energy production elements into NZEB in a form that fits with the construction industry’s design and procurement process is a major challenge. Widespread application and roll out of means for cost effective development of NZEB would accelerate the market. The significant cost reduction that is required to mainstream NZEB by 2018 is likely to revolve around processes rather than technologies. There is an additional need to look beyond NZEB performance with a longer term perspective. Support is also needed to ensure that end users and occupants appreciate the role they play in the building's energy performance.

Scope:

Proposals should focus on reducing the cost of designing and constructing new NZEB in order to increase their market uptake. Proposals should explore how improved performance beyond the NZEB level can be reached whilst maintaining an overall focus on cost reduction.

Proposals should explore the cost-effective ways in which renewable energy generation elements can be integrated into NZEB, either on-site or nearby through district solutions. Proposals could take into account the ways in which these buildings can interact with each other at the district level. Proposals could additionally explore and monitor solutions that improve the end user's experience of these buildings, and which would contribute to greater public acceptance of the need to reduce energy consumption in buildings.

Cost reduction and energy savings should apply to the whole life-cycle of the building. This challenge addresses the whole of the construction process, including inception, planning, design, pre-fabrication, on-site operations and post-construction reviews. Proposals could address one or more aspects of the whole process.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Proposals are expected to demonstrate the impacts listed below, using quantified indicators and targets wherever possible:

  • Measurable reduction of construction-related costs compared to the current cost of a new conventional building that meets current building regulations;
  • Measurable nearly zero (or beyond) energy consumption (including on-site or nearby renewable energy sources) and nearly zero impact of materials used over the whole life cycle;
  • Demonstration of co-benefits which can have an impact on the real estate value of such buildings and on living/occupancy standards.
EE-06-2017Engaging private consumers towards sustainable energyd.l. 07-06-2017
Call H2020-EE-2017-CSA-PPI (subcall de: H2020-EE-2017)
CALL ENERGY EFFICIENCY
Orçamento 55,00 M€
Specific Challenge: Consumers should be considered at the heart of the energy system and become active market players. The future private consumer should be more aware, active, energy sufficient, as well as being a prosumer producing energy for their own consumption, where this is possible. Furthermore, in view of the fluctuation in energy prices, consumers are spending an increasing share of their income on energy, with estimates stating that more than 50 million Europeans are affected by energy poverty . Energy efficiency, energy savings and increased use of locally produced, including own produced, renewable energy are key tools in addressing fuel poverty.
In this context, engagement actions are needed across Europe in order to achieve behavioural change towards more sustainable choices and decisions for energy. This includes increasing and understanding consumer 'apetite' for higher efficiency products.
Although awareness on the benefits of collective consumer action in the field of EE and RES has increased in past years, such action is still hampered by a number of barriers, including financial and regulatory barriers and inconsistencies in grid integration practice. In addition, insufficient use of relevant ICT solutions and insufficient understanding of energy bills contribute to hampering the achievement of a more sustainable energy system.

Scope
: Develop and roll out tailored and effective and innovative engagement actions to motivate changes in consumers' sustainable energy behaviour that would result in reduced energy consumption in buildings, heating/cooling systems and/or appliances. The proposed actions should focus on clearly defined target groups of private consumers (individuals or collectives), using market segmentation . The proposed actions should demonstrate an understanding of different types of behaviours and consider the different approaches needed to influence them. The actions should also address the risk of "rebound effects", propose measures to counteract them, and apply current theory and practice on consumer decision making processes (e.g. effects of new technologies on energy behaviour). All relevant stakeholders necessary for the successful implementation of the action should be involved and it is expected that relevant consumer organisations, in particular, are either directly involved or their support is clearly demonstrated in the proposal. Where relevant for the proposed action, gender issues should be taken into account, in particular the role gender characteristics may play in influencing consumer behaviour. Actions should preferably cover a wide geographic area through complementary actions covering various parts of the EU. In addition the proposed actions, when relevant, should include policy lessons from the action to contribute to policy development.
The proposed action should cover one or more of the following:  
•    Empower and facilitate actions for consumers to become prosumers, or to form collective consumer groups/consumer cooperatives (addressing energy efficiency and/or renewable energy, and energy storage, where applicable, with a focus on action).  
•    Support clearly defined groups of vulnerable consumers in tackling fuel poverty by facilitating more sustainable energy behaviour and choices in their everyday life, without compromising comfort levels. This should also aim at achieving structural changes of national policies to specifically address fuel poverty and could include the transfer of best practices for the active engagement of vulnerable consumers.  
•    Facilitate wider deployment and consumer adoption of existing ICT-based solutions, for energy efficiency and information on energy consumption and costs, with a focus on action and resulting in improved understanding of ICT interfaces and information depiction (including smart metering and related systems).  
•    Facilitate consumer understanding of energy bills (on and off line), leading to actions allowing for a reduction in energy consumption. Such actions should ensure robust monitoring to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach proposed,  
•    Create better instruments for improving consumer understanding and routing purchase decisions towards higher efficiency products, without compromising comfort levels, and with no additional relevant environmental impacts,  
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact
: Proposed actions are expected to demonstrate the impacts listed below (wherever possible, use quantified indicators and targets), depending on the scope of the proposal:  
•    Primary energy savings triggered by the project within its duration (in GWh/year per million Euro of EU funding);  
•    Number of people changing their behaviour and taking informed decisions, documenting why and how changes are an effect of particular measures taken, as well in terms of the sustainability of the behavioural change;  
•    Number of consumers engaged by actions aiming at improving consumer understanding and routing purchase decisions towards higher efficiency products;  
•    Renewable Energy production and Investments in sustainable energy triggered by the project within its duration (for actions on prosumers/consumers groups, respectively in GWh/year and million Euro of investments per million Euro of EU funding);  
•    Policies and strategies created/adapted to include fuel poverty (for actions on fuel poverty), to be measured in number of citations / statements from governance bodies.
Type of Action: Coordination and support action
EE-19-2017Public Procurement of Innovative Solutions for energy efficiencyd.l. 07-06-2017
Call H2020-EE-2017-CSA-PPI (subcall de: H2020-EE-2017)
CALL ENERGY EFFICIENCY
Orçamento 55,00 M€
Specific Challenge: Considering the large volume of public spending (19% of EU GDP, or roughly EUR 2,200 billion in 2009), the public sector constitute an important driver to stimulate market transformation towards more sustainable energy-related products and services. The Energy Efficiency Directive requires that central governments purchase only products, services and buildings with high energy-efficiency performance. Public Procurement of Innovative solutions (PPI) is not sufficiently developed in the field of energy efficiency although it could support the market up-take of energy efficient goods, buildings or services.

Scope: Actions enabling a group of procurers (buyers group) to undertake a PPI procurement for innovative solutions for, products, services buildings (NZEB, renovation) which are not yet available on a large-scale commercial basis, and which have energy performance levels that are better than the best levels available on the market. The innovative solutions procured by all procurers in the buyers group must have the same core functionality and performance characteristics, but may have additional 'local' functionality due to differences in the local context of each individual procurer. Actions should lead to the first application / commercialisation of the innovative solution, in order to assure its market uptake. Functional/performance based specifications should be ambitious but achievable without the procurement of research and development and without distorting competition. Where appropriate, proposals should build upon the outputs of ongoing projects (including the Project Development Assistance projects), networks, guides, tools, and rely on the use of cost – benefit analysis (e.g. using a life- cycle approach). Proposals may use the Procurement of Innovation Platform supported by the European Commission. The procurement of innovation process should be associated with coordination and networking activities that embed the PPI into a wider set of demand side activities, including the removal of marked barriers (e.g. lack of knowledge, practical training, tailored guidelines and legal uncertainties) and awareness and knowledge sharing activities. Other entities (e.g. end-users, certification bodies, private/NGO procurers that provide services of public interest and share the same procurement need) whose participation is well justified may participate in additional activities that clearly add value to the action. Proposals should include a clear action plan to communicate experiences and results towards potential replicators across the EU.
Applicants should refer to the part D and E of the General Annexes to this Work Programme.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. The funding rate for Public Procurement of Innovative Solutions (PPI) actions is limited to 35% of the total eligible costs (PPI is procurement for the purchase

Expected Impact: For PPI actions, proposals are expected to demonstrate the impacts listed below (wherever possible, use quantified indicators and targets):   
•    Prepare and implement the PPI procurement and PPI contracts within the timeframe of the project to ensure the first application / commercialisation of the innovative solutions.  
•    Energy performance levels of new buildings should be at least 25% better than current regulations or reach NZEB performance levels. For existing buildings, energy savings of at least 60% compared to the existing building should be reached, using innovative solutions. Products and services, should demonstrate at least 25% better performance in terms of energy efficiency than the available performance levels. 

Type of Action: Public Procurement of Innovative solutions
EE-07-2017Behavioural change toward energy efficiency through ICTd.l. 19-01-2017
Call H2020-EE-2017-IA (subcall de: H2020-EE-2017)
CALL ENERGY EFFICIENCY
Orçamento 49,00 M€

Specific Challenge: The objective is to demonstrate that ICT-based solutions can contribute to saving energy by motivating and supporting behavioural change of energy end-users.

The main challenges are (i) establishing cost-effectiveness, i.e. demonstrating that solutions allow a good return on investment through energy savings (ii) making energy usage data accessible to the consumer and to designated third parties (for application development or designing new business models around them) and (iii) demonstrating that energy savings can be achieved without compromising comfort levels.

Scope: Activities are focused on the development of innovative user-friendly digital tools and applications or services making use of energy end-user generated information or captured from in-home equipment/sensors (like smart meters, communication-enabled heat metering tools, smart plugs, smart appliances and/or energy-aware products), in possible combination with intelligent controls and automation, with the purpose to significantly enhance energy efficiency by behavioural change of end-users taking informed decisions. The solutions will focus on empowering consumers (buildings managers, buildings owners as well final users including residents, housing associations, visitors, public actors, etc.) to engage and collaborate in achieving energy savings and allowing them to explore different means and measures to manage their energy needs over the longer term.

Proposers should integrate and validate different technological elements, each element with at least TRL 6 (please see part G of the General Annexes), combined with appropriate business models and social acceptance parameters.

Insights from social and behavioural sciences should be used to understand: (i) factors influencing consumer choices and (ii) the impact of consumer behaviour on the energy system. Where relevant, gender, socio-economic, demographic and cultural differences should be identified and taken into account as a means of segmentation and tailoring actions to target groups.

The proposals should respond to the following:  

•The need for efficient and compact consortia, involving, as appropriate, ICT developers and providers, manufacturers of home appliances, energy experts, social sciences and humanities experts, citizens representatives, as well as utilities (DSOs or retailers), energy service companies (ESCOs) and building managers.  

•The impact of indoor climatic conditions on personal health, productivity and comfort.  

•The developed solutions should be deployed in a variety of building types located in at least two different climatic regions. Access to the buildings should be guaranteed, together with all relevant building information, including smart metering infrastructure.  

•The proposed solutions shall be deployed and validated in real environments, clearly defined and monitored, for a period of at least 1 year, ensuring credibility and consistency of conclusions. Validation should cover business models and RoI, and should include detailed plans for sustainability and large-scale uptake beyond the project lifetime. 

ICT solutions should primarily address energy efficiency, but may integrate other solutions including also indoor climate, building/home security or health monitoring. This "packaging" approach would need to demonstrate the added benefits for consumers, as well as the market potential.

Proposals should take into consideration the projects supported under the topic EE 11 of the Work Programme 2014-2015 of the Horizon 2020 Energy Challenge .

The topic EUB-02-2017 ("Utilities: energy management at home and in buildings") in Part 5.i. Information and Communication Technologies of the Work Programme/ LEIT is also relevant and addresses similar challenges.

The proposers should explain in detail how they will address possible ethical issues like research on human participants and personal data protection.

The proposers should also explain what will happen after the end of the action of any project-related equipment deployed in buildings for the purpose of the project. Costs for the purchase of mobile devices like mobile phones, tablets as well as cost for services of internet connections are not eligible under this topic.

Proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact: Proposed actions are expected to demonstrate the impacts listed below (wherever possible, use quantified indicators and targets):  

•Significant reduction of final energy consumption prompted by innovative ICT solutions clearly quantified and substantiated, and subsequent reduction of CO2 emissions.  

•Accelerated wider deployment and adoption of user-friendly ICT solutions prompting behavioural change and energy efficiency, including plans for its sustainability after the project's life and potential/readiness for replication.  

•Number of energy end-users changing their behaviour documenting why and how changes are an effect of particular measures taken, as well in terms of the sustainability of the behavioural change. 

The proposals should quantify foreseen impacts, using preliminary but credible baselines and benchmarks to substantiate calculations and clearly demonstrate how the energy savings will be measured and reached.

Proposals are encouraged to take advantage of using the already developed common methodologies for calculating energy savings in public buildings and social housing .

Type of Action: Innovation action


EE-12-2017Integration of Demand Response in Energy Management Systems while ensuring interoperability through Public Private Partnership (EeB PPP)d.l. 19-01-2017
Call H2020-EE-2017-IA (subcall de: H2020-EE-2017)
CALL ENERGY EFFICIENCY
Orçamento 49,00 M€

Specific Challenge: The control, automation and monitoring tools that can be integrated into buildings are becoming more and more sophisticated. In order to guarantee energy efficient operation, building service systems need to deliver adequate control and monitoring of building energy parameters. It is essential to develop and demonstrate interoperable energy automation, control and monitoring tools for efficient heating, domestic hot water, ventilation, cooling, lighting, shading, storage, energy generation, and other building systems while ensuring a high quality indoor environment. This includes the investigation of demand response and energy management of individual customers as well.

The challenge is to integrate demand response enabling elements into Energy Management Systems and thus create 'building – energy system interaction' towards optimising, at building level, energy consumption, production and storage considering the availability and price of energy supplied via the grid. A specific challenge is that Energy Management Systems and smart home devices are often not interoperable but are linked to a certain brand, technology and/or standard. Therefore full interoperability between grids, systems and products for seamless integration of all required components in building energy management systems is crucial.

Scope: At the building and building unit level (residential or non-residential) the focus should be on optimisation, integration and demonstration of cost effective and interoperable solutions, including testing of new technologies and systems in real life situations.

The proposed solutions shall be demonstrated for buildings which incorporate intelligent Energy Management Systems and new technologies (smart home devices). They should ensure interoperability, evolving and adapting to the operational environment (self-learning), including indoor and outdoor conditions, the availability of energy from local RES generation, the availability and price of energy from grids and local energy storage capacities. Also the possibility of clustering individual demand response services, self-generation and storage at district level should be considered. Such solutions should be effective and resilient, ensuring low operational and maintenance costs and could include functions for predictive maintenance. Solutions should be compatible and appropriately integrated with smart grids via open standards, taking into account existing standards as well as standards under development. The proposed activities should clearly involve and engage building occupants, helping them to become an interactive part of the demand response solution, as well as better managing their energy demand. Proposals should involve energy suppliers (DSOs) and industrial technology suppliers.

The topic EUB-02-2017 ("Utilities: energy management at home and in buildings") in Part 5.i Information and Communication Technologies of the Work Programme is also relevant and addresses similar challenges.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 3 and 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

This topic will be implemented under the PPP on Energy-efficient Buildings. The activities are expected to be implemented at Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6-8 (please see part G of the General Annexes).

Expected Impact: Proposals are expected to demonstrate the impacts listed below, using quantified indicators and targets wherever possible:  

•Facilitate the deployment of solutions that would improve demand response in buildings.  

•Real time optimisation of energy demand and supply integrating demand-response into intelligent building energy management systems and/or other systems.  

•High replicability across the EU.  

•Energy cost savings through integrated home automation solutions.  

•Higher indoor environmental quality and adaptability to external conditions, leading to improved comfort and living standards, while optimising energy consumption. 

Type of Action: Innovation action


EE-20-2017Bringing to market more energy efficient and integrated data centresd.l. 19-01-2017
Call H2020-EE-2017-IA (subcall de: H2020-EE-2017)
CALL ENERGY EFFICIENCY
Orçamento 49,00 M€

Specific Challenge: Following the increasing demand for cloud computing, big data, Internet of Things, dematerialization of documents and other ICT services, the demand for ICT processing is expected to grow exponentially in the coming years. Data centres should become more energy efficient and should maximise integration of renewable energy sources. Intermittent renewable energy sources need to be combined with energy storage (electricity or cold/heat) to ensure efficient and secure energy management in data centres. In addition, existing and new data centres should be better integrated into the various energy grids (electricity and/or heat) in order to turn their energy use and waste into a benefit for the whole energy system. Previous research activities in this area have identified a wide array of innovative solutions and concepts. However, further research and development activities are needed to bring them to the market. Speeding up the time-to-market of these promising solutions is the main challenge under this topic.

Scope: Innovation Actions are needed to increase the energy efficiency, the use of renewable energy sources and integration of data centres in the energy system. Proposals should cover several following areas: innovative and energy efficient cooling solutions, waste heat reuse, geographical and temporal workload balance, integration of local and remote renewable energy sources, integration in smart grids, integration with district heating/cooling networks, integration of power backup system in the grid and use of heat pumps for efficient use of waste heat etc. Proposals should include the development of business models to trade heat, cold, electricity or energy security and storage. Proposals should build upon the results of previous projects such as the ones funded under the FP7-Smartcities Call 2013 (namely RenewIT, DC4Cities, Dolfin, Genic, GreenDataNet, GEYSER). Proposals should focus on new and existing data centres (indicatively from 500 kW to 1 MW IT load).

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 2 and 3 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact: Proposals are expected to demonstrate the impacts listed below (wherever possible, use quantified indicators and targets):  

•Bring data centre specific innovative energy efficiency technologies and solutions, already developed by research projects, to market faster and cheaper.  

•Reaching a Power Usage Effectiveness  of up to 1.2.  

•Achieve a high share of the data centre energy consumption covered by sustainable energy resources. 

Type of Action: Innovation action

LCE-09-2016Increasing the competitiveness of the EU PV manufacturing industryd.l. 08-09-2016
Call H2020-LCE-2016-4 (subcall de: H2020-LCE-2016-2017)
CALL FOR COMPETITIVE LOW-CARBON ENERGY
Orçamento 85,00 M€

Renewable Energy Technologies

Specific Challenge:

The European PV manufacturing industry has faced strong foreign competition in the last years, which has led to a dramatic reduction of its production capacity. The challenge is to develop innovative manufacturing solutions that substantially improve competitiveness of the European PV manufacturing industry and help regain a part of the potentially increasing worldwide PV market, while creating more secure and sustainable supply chains for the European PV market

Scope:

Demonstrating manufacturing innovation and scale-up of highly performing PV technologies at pilot-line level, targeting GW-scale, high-yield throughput and cost-effective industrial production of cells and modules.

Applications for Innovation Actions (bringing the technology from TRL 5-6 to 6-7) are invited (please see part G of the General Annexes).

Opening the project's test sites, pilot and demonstration facilities, or research infrastructures for practice oriented education, training or knowledge exchange is encouraged.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 10 to 15 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts

Expected Impact:

Trigger new investments in the European PV industry, via the establishment of pilot lines which target innovative/optimised production processes and/or tailored development of equipment for mainstream PV technologies at the state of the art of research, and show the potential for cost and performance competitiveness of the final product.

LCE-13-2016Solutions for reduced maintenance, increased reliability and extended life-time of off-shore wind turbines/farmsd.l. 08-09-2016
Call H2020-LCE-2016-4 (subcall de: H2020-LCE-2016-2017)
CALL FOR COMPETITIVE LOW-CARBON ENERGY
Orçamento 85,00 M€

Renewable Energy Technologies

Specific Challenge:

The challenge is to achieve a very substantial reduction in Operation and Maintenance (O&M) costs through new O&M and control concepts, including logistics planning, decision making and operation, providing an optimized balance between maximizing generation and minimizing loads on the turbines, and reducing the number of inspections and repairs with more remote monitoring and operations.

Scope:

Offshore wind turbines, both fixed bottom and floating, are subject to high loads in form of vibrations from wind and waves, as well as from rotation of the turbines. The focus is to reduce the need for maintenance of wind turbines/farms and to develop measures for life-time extension, demonstrating innovative solutions and tools, and thereby the levelised cost of wind energy. The action can include the development of tools for doing predictive maintenance, hereunder models of component/soil degradation, and establishment a database with operational and failure data for validation of tools. The actions should consider not only the wind turbines but also the substructure and the soil conditions.

Participation of wind turbine manufacturers and large wind farm operators is expected.

TRL 7 shall be achieved at the end of project activities (please see part G of the General Annexes).

Opening the project's test sites, pilot and demonstration facilities, or research infrastructures for practice oriented education, training or knowledge exchange is encouraged.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 7 to 10 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts

Expected Impact:

The action will result in the reduction of component failure and increased reliability. The development of innovative solutions and tools will result in more reliable wind turbines and plants. It is expected that the output of the project will significantly contribute to an improved performance for new and operating off-shore wind power plants and therefore to the cost of energy. Presented tools and solutions might have an exploitation potential in the onshore wind sector. The action should contribute to the strengthening the European industrial technology base, thereby creating growth and jobs in Europe.

LCE-01-2017Next generation innovative technologies enabling smart grids, storage and energy system integration with increasing share of renewables: distribution networkd.l. 14-02-2017
Call H2020-LCE-2017-3 (subcall de: H2020-LCE-2016-2017)
CALL FOR COMPETITIVE LOW-CARBON ENERGY
Orçamento 114,90 M€
Specific Challenge: In a fast evolving and competitive global landscape, Europe needs to develop and mature the next generation of competitive technologies and services for the electricity distribution grid at medium and low voltage levels, which are clearly going beyond the state of the art and will be ready to integrate the market in five to ten years' time. These technologies and services should enable advanced solutions for demand-response, smart grid, storage and energy system integration while respecting the needed stability and security in the context of an increasing share of variable renewable energy sources in the electricity grid.

Scope: Proposals must target technologies, tools and/or services in one of the following areas:
In 2016:
1. Storage: technologies for the storage of energy in the distribution network and their integration and exploitation in the smart grid context, including decentralised storage at user premises or at substation level; this encompasses optimal use of the potential of electric vehicles; particular attention should be put on cost, stability and lifetime;
2. Synergies between energy networks: develop power to heat solutions and strategies (e.g. through the use of water boilers, heat pumps, thermal inertia of buildings, cooling needs, etc.), develop variable renewable power to gas/fuel solutions; technologies for hydrogen production and storage are addressed in the frame of the Fuel Cell and Hydrogen JU and are therefore excluded from this call
In 2017:
3. Demand-response: tools and technology validation for demand response forecast, profiling, segmentation, load forecasting, innovative and user-friendly services for customers based on smart metering; inclusion of Virtual Power Plant and microgrid as active balancing assets; associated innovative market and business models; secure data handling;
4. Intelligent electricity distribution grid: tools for the optimisation of the distribution grid, technologies for autonomous and self-healing grids, energy management and control systems, technologies for advanced power electronics, for enhanced observability, e.g. real-time system awareness; secured communications in the smart grid in particular cyber security and big data analytics.
Proposals will clearly indicate which area is targeted.
Proposals will include a predesign of interfaces to energy networks and will demonstrate a good knowledge and compatibility with current regulations, available or emerging standards and interoperability issues applying to their technologies, in particular in connection to ongoing work in the Smart Grid Task Force and its Experts Groups in the field of Standardization (e.g. CEN-CLC-ETSI M/490), regulatory environment for privacy, data protection , cyber security, smart grid deployment, infrastructure and industrial policy (http://ec.europa.eu/energy/en/topics/markets-and-consumers/smart-grids-and-meters/smart-grids-task-force).
A preliminary analysis of potential business models will be made as well as an analysis of potential needs in the field of standards and regulations so that markets can effectively adopt the developed technologies in 5 to 10 years.
Projects will mature technologies in a range of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of typically 3 to 6 (please see part G of the General Annexes). Proposals will indicate the estimated levels of TRL at the beginning and at the end of the project.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 2 and 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.
In order to ensure the coverage of all areas, for each call, proposals above all thresholds will be ranked in each of the areas opened under the call and the first ranked proposals in each area will be selected until the available budget is exhausted (first, all proposals ranked nb 1, then nb 2, etc.); in case of insufficient budget to select all projects of the same rank to cover the areas, the best scores will prevail; in case of equal scores, standard Horizon 2020 rules will prevail.

Expected Impact: Proposals must demonstrate that they are relevant, compatible with the broad EU energy policy context such as Climate-Energy packages and Energy Union. Where appropriate, they should also indicate if and how they will contribute to:   
•    ongoing policy developments in the field of the design of the internal electricity market, of the retail market and ongoing discussions on self-consumption,   
•    enhanced interconnections between Member States and/or between energy networks.
Proposals must demonstrate contributing to the following overall impacts:   
•    The EU power network should be capable of integrating large share of renewables (more than 50% by 2030 , in particular variable energy sources and, in a stable and secure way.   
•    EU based companies will be able to deliver adequate competitive product and services on the market in 5 years-10 years after the end of the project.
Proposals will also demonstrate contributing to the following specific expected impacts for each area:   
1.    Develop energy storage systems providing services to the distribution grid and the consumer at affordable costs, deferral of investments in grid reinforcements, validation of business models; 
2.    Cost effective conversion of excess electricity, reduce/avoid curtailment, provide services to the grid;   
3.    Enable and/or enhance demand response schemes bringing proven and quantified benefits for the grid and the consumers / prosumers; validation of business models;   
4.    Improved basis for renewable energy sources hosting capacity, stability and flexibility in the distribution grid operating with large share of variable renewables, reduction of congestion.
Finally, proposals will also include ad-hoc indicators to measure the progress against specific objectives of their choice which could be used to assess the progress during the project life.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action
LCE-04-2017Demonstration of system integration with smart transmission grid and storage technologies with increasing share of renewablesd.l. 14-02-2017
Call H2020-LCE-2017-3 (subcall de: H2020-LCE-2016-2017)
CALL FOR COMPETITIVE LOW-CARBON ENERGY
Orçamento 114,90 M€
Specific Challenge: The integration of variable renewable energies challenges the electricity transmission network technologies, economics, and existing storage systems. Also, the target to reach 10% of interconnection of the production capacity calls for new approaches to the transmission network and its management and opens new perspectives in terms of sharing and resources (e.g. production, storage, trading and handling of electricity from variable renewable energy sources) across borders.

Scope: Proposals will target the transmission grid and demonstrate a combination of at least 2 of the following aspects:  
•    Power transmission technologies and management of large scale generation in the context of a significantly increased share of variable renewables and interactions with the distribution grid;  
•    Large scale storage relevant to the transmission network (up to GWh scale), potentially including several storage technologies addressing different time scale (e.g. daily, seasonal), ramping rates and volumes, managed centrally or in a distributed way;  
•    Communication / ICT technologies / control tools to enhance real-time awareness, to introduce more flexibility in the transmission grid, to integrate storage facilities, more flexible generation, demand-response mechanism and its interface with the distribution grid; solutions to enhance cross-border collaboration;  
•    New approaches to the wholesale market facilitating the participation of variable renewable energy sources, remunerating adequately new flexibility services to the grid such as offered by storage, active participation of demand and new players such as aggregators and reducing the cost of operations.
The targeted technology readiness levels (TRL) will range typically between 5 and 8 (please see part G of the General Annexes). Proposals will indicate the estimated levels of TRL at the beginning and at the end of the project.
Proposals will include an analysis of current regulations, codes and standards applying to their case as well as an analysis of business models and pan-European EU market integration if relevant. Where appropriate, environmental issues will be addressed in the light of existing regulations (e.g. water framework directive, Natura 2000, etc.).
Proposal tackling problems of transnational nature will be given specific attention.
Proposals will also foresee coordination with Horizon 2020 funded projects carrying out demonstration in the context of smart grid and storage in particular for policy-relevant issues such as regulatory framework, business models, data management, obstacles to innovation. It is recommended to reserve of the order of 2% of the EU funding for these activities. A Coordination and Support Action is foreseen for the organisation of this collaboration in this Work Programme (see Topic LCE 3)
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 15 and 20 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact: Proposals must demonstrate that they are relevant, compatible with the broad EU energy policy context such as Climate-Energy packages, Energy Union. Where relevant, proposal should clearly describe how they will contribute to:   
•    ongoing policy developments in the field of the design of the internal electricity market, of the retail market, ongoing discussions on self-consumption,   
•    enhanced interconnections between Member States and/or between energy networks.
Proposals will demonstrate that the proposed solution can be scaled up to GW or GWh level (if relevant) and replicated, indicating where, how the demonstrated solution could apply with an estimate of the quantities of energy and power involved. Proposals will also describe if and how they contribute to ensure that the EU electricity network:   
•    is capable of integrating large share of renewables (at least 50%  by 2030), in particular from variable sources;   
•    can operate in a stable and secure way;   
•    operates within a well-functioning wholesale market, providing the EU consumers with competitive prices of electricity and integrating renewable sources in a cost effective manner;   
•    evolves towards a pan-European network with increased levels of security of resource sharing.
Finally, proposals will also include ad-hoc indicators to measure the progress against specific objectives of their choice which could be used to assess the progress during the project life.

Type of Action: Innovation action
LCE-05-2017Tools and technologies for coordination and integration of the European energy systemd.l. 14-02-2017
Call H2020-LCE-2017-3 (subcall de: H2020-LCE-2016-2017)
CALL FOR COMPETITIVE LOW-CARBON ENERGY
Orçamento 114,90 M€
Specific Challenge: The increasing share of variable renewable energy sources and the 2020 and 2030 targets for the reduction of greenhouse gas emission in the EU are calling for important changes in our energy system: more flexibility, more active involvement of all stakeholders and more collaboration. If no actions are taken, the power system will face several risks such as, poor quality of the electricity supply, congestion, lack of stability, excessive levels or curtailments, impossibility to cope with electro mobility demand, etc. The challenge is therefore to create and deploy common tools for planning, integration and operation across the energy system and its actors.

Scope
: Proposals must target the development of technologies, tools and systems in one or several of the following areas:  
1.    Novel European grid and end-to-end energy system planning tools, including foreseeable features such as storage, aggregation, demand-response and integrating cost aspects;  
2.    Enhanced TSO / DSO collaboration and coordination tools, secure data exchange across networks along whole the value chain, ICT tools for cross-border trading for nearly real-time balancing; definition of minimum set of specifications to allow automated digital cross-border electricity market;  
3.    Solutions for the deployment of neutral data access points ensuring a fair and transparent data access to all energy actors (TSOs, DSOs, ESCOs, Telcos, ICT companies, consumers, etc.); validation of new business models resulting from the cooperation between them; investigation of incentives and possible commercial arrangements with a fair share of benefits across actors;  
4.    Synergies between electricity, gas and heat networks, associated business and market mechanisms and analysis of existing regulatory aspects; technologies for hydrogen production and storage are addressed in the frame of the Fuel Cell and Hydrogen JU and are therefore excluded from this call;  
5.    Socio-economic aspects and environmental aspects related to large scale infrastructures relevant to renewable generation and changes to transmission infrastructure need for their integration; socioeconomic aspects of consumer behaviours in demand-response mechanisms, consumer engagement.
Proposals will demonstrate a good knowledge and compatibility with current regulations, available or emerging standards and interoperability issues applying to their technologies, in particular in connection to ongoing work in the Smart Grid Task Force and its Experts Groups in the field of Standardization (e.g. CEN-CLC-ETSI M/490), regulatory environment for privacy, data protection , cyber security, smart grid deployment, infrastructure and industrial policy (http://ec.europa.eu/energy/en/topics/markets-and-consumers/smart-grids-and-meters/smart-grids-task-force).
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 2 and 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately and between EUR 0.5 and 1 million for proposals addressing area 5 only. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.
In order to ensure the coverage of each area, proposals above all thresholds will be ranked in each of the 5 areas and the first ranked proposals in each area will be selected until the available budget is exhausted (first, all proposals ranked nb 1, then nb 2, etc.); in case of insufficient budget to select all projects of the same rank to cover the 5 areas, the best scores will prevail; in case of equal scores, standard rules do apply.

Expected Impact: Proposals must demonstrate that they are relevant, compatible with the broad EU energy policy context such as Climate-Energy packages, Energy Union. Where relevant, they should also indicate if and how they will contribute to:  
•    ongoing policy developments in the field of the design of the internal electricity market, of the retail market, ongoing discussions on self-consumption,  
•    enhanced interconnections between Member States and/or between energy networks.
Proposals must demonstrate if and how they contribute to the following impacts.  
1.    Optimized grid planning and design at European level, maximizing the capacity of the grid to host variable renewables, take full advantages of a pan-European grid for stability and security  
2.    Safe, secure, efficient and coherent data handling, enabling more cross border trading and real time balancing  
3.    Enabling new flexibility services to the grid associated with new business opportunities, offering the access to cheaper energy for the consumers and maximising the social welfare  
4.    Increasing the potential of exchanges between energy networks, enhanced security of supply, create business opportunities, avoidance of curtailment, offering new services to the grid  
5.    Account for human behaviour in the design of infrastructure and demand-response to avoid blockages due to social acceptance, placing the consumer at the center of the energy system.
Finally, proposals will also include ad-hoc indicators to measure the progress against specific objectives of their choice which could be used to assess the progress during the project life.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action
SCC-1-2016-2017Smart Cities and Communities lighthouse projectsd.l. 05-04-2017
Call H2020-SCC-2017-IA (subcall de: H2020-SCC-2016-2017)
SMART AND SUSTAINABLE CITIES
Orçamento 69,50 M€
Specific Challenge: To demonstrate solutions at district scale integrating smart homes and buildings, smart grids (electricity, district heating, telecom, water, etc.), energy storage, electric vehicles and smart charging infrastructures as well as latest generation ICT platforms which must be based on open specifications. This should be accompanied by energy efficiency measures and the use of very high shares of renewables at the level of districts. The goal is to facilitate a successful transformation towards intelligent, user-driven and demand-oriented city infrastructures and services.

Scope: Lighthouse cities develop and test integrated innovative solutions at district scale. These lighthouse cities should act as exemplars for their region helping to plan the replication of these solutions, adapted to different local conditions.. Links with the broader Sustainable and Integrated Urban Development Strategies in the framework of the European Structural and Investment Funds should be sought as well as the funds available for the upscaling and replication of the projects (in particular ESIF).
A city can be funded as a lighthouse city only once under Horizon2020.
Technologies must be at least "very near-to-market" (technological readiness levels TRL 7 and more, see part G of the General Annexes). The innovation is in the combination of these technologies.
It is compulsory to develop and test innovative business models that enable deployment at large scale at different locations during the execution of the project.
An important focus of this call is on replication of solutions: Follower cities are cities that have yet to acquire the technical competence to become a lighthouse city. However, they shall be fully involved in the project from the beginning and commit sufficient resources within the project to deliver a business model that allows the financing of an ambitious replication of most of the solutions developed within the project and deliver it within a few years of the project's end (perhaps using ESIF). Proof of long term commitment of follower cities to replicate validated solutions as well as measures for active knowledge transfer (e.g. active mentoring or staff exchange between cities) will be evaluated.
It is essential that proposals cover all of the following aspects (the coverage of these aspects will be evaluated under the ‘Impact’ criterion):  
•    Districts of buildings – old or new or mixed and ideally nearly zero or low energy – that should be chosen in relation to the size of the respective city and the local conditions and should guarantee high positive impact of the project. Each building in such a district shall become smart, more efficient, reliable and well integrated in the energy system of the district. It should feature latest generation ICT, smart meters, smart appliances, smart energy management, smart use of the thermal mass; smart management of cooling (where applicable) etc. and capitalize also on synergies between these single components. These smart buildings shall be integrated to form a smart district with intensive interaction between the buildings for increased synergies and eventually increased efficiency and decreased costs.  
•    Smart interaction and smart management of different energy systems (electricity, heat, cold, gas or other grid systems (including water)) at district level and going far beyond classical electricity grids management only (e.g. smart solutions for storage including the intelligent use of the thermal mass of buildings that exploit synergies between these urban grids in order to increase efficiency and reduce energy costs).  
•    Integration with and/or consolidation of low carbon ICT systems at district level.  
•    Electromobility (in line with Directive 2014/94): smart electrical vehicle (EV) charging (grid to vehicle and vehicle to grid) while ensuring a positive impact on the whole energy system from a technical and economic point of view. The impact of the deployment of EV on locally weak or old grids must be assessed during the project.  
•    Include partners from industry, public authorities, research communities and small and medium-sized enterprises.
It is essential that all lighthouse cities cover all of the following aspects (the coverage of these aspects will be evaluated under the ‘Impact’ criterion):  
•    Significantly improve energy efficiency: Innovative integration of existing buildings with new buildings (especially in areas of mixed use such as university campuses, innovation districts, etc.). Proposals shall group energy efficiency measures by buildings or group of similar buildings in the BEST tables (available at the participant portal).  
•    Incorporate renewable energy sources (RES) maximising the use of local resources (including waste heat, electricity and/or heat storage) and high shares of self-consumption. The active participation of consumers (e.g. use of aggregators) must be demonstrated.  
•    Integrate electricity fuelling infrastructure for electric vehicle fleets. The impact of the deployment of high numbers of vehicles on the electricity grid must be assessed (costs of the recharging infrastructure and the vehicles are not eligible).  
•    Use ICT solutions for improved planning management, control and maintenance of physical urban infrastructures and operational technologies in buildings, energy and transport, and that enable better services for individuals and businesses.  
•    Prove interoperability between software modules to allow an effective management of components and information flows. To this end, and to ensure adaptability as new user requirements and technologies evolve, urban ICT platforms must be based on open specifications, including the data structures and application program interfaces (API). Concerns about security, privacy and confidentiality need to be addressed.  
•    Develop innovative Business Models to demonstrate that both technical and financial risks are low enough for large scale investments in other EU cities with similar characteristics. Deployment plans for the lighthouse cities and quick replication in the follower cities and potentially other cities shall be submitted (and will be part of the evaluation).
Each project should:  
•    Address concrete urban challenges identified by the respective urban authorities.  
•    Have a performance monitoring which lasts for a period of at least 2 years during the project.  
•    Develop a convincing replication and investment plan for each lighthouse city and each follower city that describes (a) what the partners in each city will do in order to ensure a large scale replication in their city after the successful end of the project and (b) where the funding will come from (in particular whether ESIF would be used). The initial investment plans (to be refined during the execution of the project) shall show that after successful demonstration private capital can take over further investments at low technical and financial risks so that the economically weakest regions and cities of all sizes become attractive for investors.  
•    Have a consortium with clearly defined structure roles and responsibilities for all involved entities. The different actions in each city and between all cities (6 or more) must show excellent synergies. The added value of this cooperation versus each city alone must be clearly described.  
•    Have a well-balanced geographical coverage between lighthouse and follower cities.  
•    Commit to scientific and technical requirements to support reliability and sustainability: Open data and interoperability are necessary conditions to allow for ease of innovation for improved replicability and economies of scale, and so that solutions can be extended and lock-in of customers to specific solutions and/or vendors can be avoided.  
•    Contribute to common long term data collection systems, measurement and disclosure methodology, in order to facilitate a common footprint calculation methodology and other metrics (especially for energy saving; CO2 reductions, financial savings, number of jobs created, environmental impact etc.).  
•    Feature a work package for cooperation with other selected projects on main project issues including business models and legal, regulatory and other market barriers (foresee about 2 % to 3% of the requested funds for inter-project cooperation).  
•    Incorporate all performance data into the Smart Cities Information System database (SCIS)  and cooperate with CITYKEYS, the support action selected in the 2014 call for performance measurement across sectors.  
•    Use a robust and viable monitoring protocol, also valid after the end of the project so that future data can easily be introduced into the SCIS.
Each project must:  
•    Be realised in 3 new lighthouse cities that are situated in different EU Member states or associated countries.  
•    Involve at least 3 follower cities from at least 3 different EU Member states or associated countries (that are different also from the countries of the lighthouse cities of the project).
Each lighthouse city must:
Have Sustainable Energy Action Plan (SEAP), positively evaluated by the Covenant of Mayors (please attach proof in Annex) before submitting a proposal .
Non-eligible costs:
The costs of construction (including scale of unit costs), the costs of retrofitting (including scale of unit costs), the full cost of purchasing or leasing electric vehicles, the costs of acquisition of standard ICT tools, conventional RES and their mounting are not eligible. Insulation of the building envelope, good windows; heat pumps, and other appliances are not eligible costs.
Eligible costs:
Eligible costs cover all those innovative aspects that transform the city into a smart city, such as for example:  
•    Integration of storage with all grids (across electricity, telecom, heating, cooling, gas, water, etc.).  
•    Smart building management incorporating smart appliances, smart meters, domotics, of which only the smart/innovative part that is leading to a deep integration with the local energy system (electricity, telecom, heating and cooling, gas) is eligible.  
•    Smart integration of the electricity grid with local RES (in and around the city), with electricity storage and heat storage (or cold storage for air conditioning or cooling or freezing, etc.) at the district level; the smart use of the existing thermal mass for better building management and the integration with energy-efficient heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) is recommended and eligible.  
•    Only the innovative parts of RES, suited for smart integration of PV modules, wind turbines, innovative integration of heat pumps or CHP combined with smart management of heat and electricity are eligible.  
•    Economic research for and development of highly innovative approaches and testing of integrated business models that avoid lock-in situations and that lead to reduction of the energy bills for citizens.  
•    Smart storage (electricity, heat or cold) and its management for maximising self-consumption is eligible.  
•    ICT: only platforms based on open specifications with open application program interfaces (API), and that cater for data security and cyber-security are eligible.  
•    Work on further refinements of the initially submitted replication plans and creating more ambitious targets during the project are eligible.  
•    Training and education within and between cities is compulsory and thus eligible.  
•    Including additional cities in the training and education (if the benefit is clearly stated) is eligible.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 12 to 18 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact: Each project shall significantly contribute to the impacts described below:  
•    Put in practice a bankable solution for a challenge identified by the city;  
•    Increase the energy efficiency on district scale;  
•    Increase significantly the share of renewable energies, their integration into the energy system, stimulate self-consumption, reduce curtailment to the minimum;  
•    Increase local air quality;  
•    Reduce the technical and financial risks in order to give confidence to investors for investing in large scale replication  
•    Make the local energy system more secure, more stable and cheaper for the citizens and public authorities;  
•    Ensure the roll-out of electric vehicles in cities while containing the need for excessive upgrading of the electricity grid);  
•    Reduce transport based CO2 emissions, on the basis of CO2 intensity of the European electricity grid of 540 CO2/kWh (coherent with TEST format - available on the Participant Portal);  
•    Create stronger links and active cooperation between cities in a large number of Member States with a large coverage of cities with different size, geography, climatic zones and economical situations.

Type of Action: Innovation action

   

ICT    <<    Transportes
ART-01-2017ICT infrastructure to enable the transition towards road transport automationd.l. 26-01-2017
Call H2020-ART-2017-Two_stages (subcall de: H2020-ART-2016-2017)
2017 AUTOMATED ROAD TRANSPORT - Two Stages
Orçamento 50,00 M€
 Esta call decorre em 2 fases. Data de fecho 2a fase: 27-09-2017. Esta call reúne os seguintes tópicos: ART-01-2017 (IA) ART-03-2017 (IA) ART-07-2017 (IA)

Type of Action: IA (Innovation action)

Project size: 5-15 M€


Specific Challenge: Building on the rapid development of ICT technologies, cooperative ITS and more accurate and reliable satellite navigation and positioning, automated road transport will enable driving strategies which are safe, sustainable and efficient on the level of the whole transport system. There are still many ICT-related challenges to overcome, in particular those related to the connectivity required for advanced levels of road vehicle automation and the architecture of such a connected ICT infrastructure.


Scope: The focus will be on the development, testing and real-life validation of ICT infrastructure architectures, integrating state-of-the-art ICT technologies, systems and functions to enable the transition towards road vehicle automation (up to automation levels 3  and 4 ). Proposals should bring together actors from automotive, IT and telecommunication industries as necessary to address one or several of the following areas:

―Functional and technical requirements for the required connectivity (V2V and V2I) for large-scale deployment of vehicle automation levels 3 and 4, by analysing the use cases for the deployment of stable and reliable connectivity over commercial telecom networks and over dedicated ITS spectrum. It is envisaged that both types of connectivity are needed for the deployment of large-scale automation. Proposers should address cyber-security aspects in depth.

―In relation to connectivity: architecture, functional and technical requirements for data generation, processing, storage and retrieval in the context of large-scale deployment of automation levels 3 and 4. Decision making processes needing data to operate vehicles and/or infrastructure should be distinguished from the provision of infotainment services and from other third party services. Regarding business models based on innovative, cross-sector use of data, proposers should address and analyse preconditions which might require public authority intervention. Proposers should address cyber-security aspects in depth.

―Tamper-proof in-vehicle platforms for automated vehicles building on and advancing the principles of cyber security for automated vehicles.

―Dynamic and accurate localisation and mapping, using cloud-based spatial data for highly automated driving (including sourcing, processing and information maintenance); accurate mapping and precise localisation based on European GNSS, using fully the capacity of vehicle connectivity and sensors and map data feedback loops; security of information enabling automated transport systems.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 5 to 15 million each would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.


Expected Impact: Actions will address the ICT-infrastructure related challenges to enable the transition towards advanced levels of road vehicle automation.

As described in the specific challenge above, actions are expected to contribute to improved evidence-based knowledge of required ICT-infrastructure architectures. Actions are expected to demonstrate how issues such as analysis of costs (investment, operations and maintenance) and requirements for interoperability, latency, throughput, congestion strategies, data verification and data integrity are considered.

Actions are expected to demonstrate how they will provide concrete, evidence-based input feeding into standardisation processes (notably supporting interoperability and cyber security) and policy decisions (e.g. for spectrum policy).

Considerable progress will be made regarding real time control systems for automated driving.

Actions will contribute to more reliable processing of information for automated transport based on data fusion algorithms to combine V2V and V2X information with on-board sensor information.

Actions will contribute to opening up a services market, as well as advancing public interest applications based on data captured from automation processes concerning e.g. the driver, the vehicle and the journeys made.

MG-5.2-2017Innovative ICT solutions for future logistics operationsd.l. 26-01-2017
Call H2020-MG-2017-Two_Stages (subcall de: H2020-MG-2016-2017)
2017 MOBILITY FOR GROWTH - Two Stages
Orçamento 185,50 M€
 Esta call decorre em 2 fases. Data de fecho 2a fase: 19-10-2017 Esta call reúne os seguintes tópicos: MG-1.3-2017 (RIA) MG-1.4-2016-2017 (RIA) MG-2.1-2017 (IA) MG-2.4-2017 (IA) MG-3.2-2017 (RIA) MG-4.1-2017 (IA) MG-4.2-2017 (IA) MG-5.2-2017 (RIA) MG-5.4-2017 (RIA) MG-7.1-2017 (RIA) MG-7.2-2017 (RIA) MG-7.3-2017 (RIA)

5. LOGISTICS

Type of Action: RIA (Research and Innovation action)

Project size: 3-5 M€


Specific Challenge: In a logistics sector with highly increased collaboration, intermodal and dynamic re-routing of freight, there is a need to exploit ICT advances such as Internet-of-Things, big data, new satellite navigation infrastructure and Intelligent Transport Systems with changes in business needs. We need to rethink the way we plan, book and execute freight flows, new systems should provide all stakeholders with reliable information and allow exploitation of the full potential of horizontal collaboration. Furthermore we will need to match the increased need for real-time and open data to plan and track shared freight with guarantees that the exploitation of this data is both safe and secure. Given the vast number small and medium sized enterprises active in the transport sector this project should have a clear focus on the ease of access to all future ICT solutions. To maximise the impact of data sharing, it is vital to also consider the needs and policies of all public stakeholders (cities, regions, road operators, customs authorities, etc.).


Scope: Building on previous work in the e-Freight domain (including developments on rail TAF TSI, road ITS, inland waterways RIS, maritime SafeSeaNet, European GNNS programmes and aviation SESAR) and on the work of the Digital Transport and Logistics Forum , proposals should cover the development and integration of at least 2 of the 3 following issues:

A) Planning and data

―Develop electronic booking and planning systems for freight to find the best (combinations of) modes and optimal route (e.g. GNSS based route analysis or opportunities for “milk runs”), to progress towards a completely paperless environment and freight traceability information allowing better network exploitation and more efficient logistics operations.

―Identify opportunities for increased availability of freight data (such as shipments, volumes, statuses, destinations, etc.) taking into account security, privacy, data ownership and policies for data sharing .

―Develop algorithms to increase both load factors and optimise the planned delivery route, based on the specifications of Modular Load Units, the vehicle or container and all required destinations.

B) Dynamic routing and business models

―Develop event management systems that create visibility and transparency and allow real-time exception management for faster traffic reconfiguration and increased resilience.

―Develop business models for dynamic transport services (e.g. cargo was automatically switched between barge and train because a truck encountered traffic congestions and was late at the hub).

C) Interoperability and everything connected

―Develop simple connection tools that allow low-cost integration of SMEs in the supply chain, offering two-way communication and allowing both efficient planning of their part of the supply chain and giving feedback to other stakeholders.

―Integrate simple and cost effective sensors or smart devices (IoT, ITS) into supply chain data management tools.

―Harmonise interoperability between supply chain partners, allowing easy information sharing and creating trust in the complexity of multi-modal transport. Solutions should link all public and private stakeholders.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 3 to 5 million each would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.


Expected Impact: To realise the full potential of horizontal collaboration, real time data and high interoperability, actions are expected to demonstrate how the following aspects will be achieved:

―Better, more flexible integration of ICT solutions and operational processes, linking the digital and physical flows.

―Seamless freight transport execution across Member States and modes of transport.

―Increased reliability and reduced transit times.

―10% higher load factors and 10% shorter delivery routes resulting in respective reductions in fuel consumption and in lower emissions.

―Viable business models for collaborative and dynamic transport services

   

ICT    <<    Ação Climática
CIRC-01b-2017Systemic, eco-innovative approaches for the circular economy: large-scale demonstration projects - Systemic services for the circular economyd.l. 07-03-2017
Call H2020-CIRC-2017-two-stage (subcall de: H2020-CIRC-2016-2017)
Circular Economy
Orçamento 70,00 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de fecho 2ª Fase: 5 Setembro 2017

Circular economy

Specific Challenge: The increasing resources' constraints that EU is facing strongly condition
its competitiveness and the quality of life of individuals. Important gains in resource
efficiency can be made by replacing current linear economic models with circular models of
production and consumption, which result, at the same time, in a substantial reduction of
GHG emissions. While relying on industrial leadership, the success of circular economy
models will depend on adopting a systemic approach to eco-innovation that encompasses
value and supply chains in their entirety and engages all actors involved in such chains. A
systemic approach entails foresight of the diverse impacts that transformative innovative
solutions can have on the economy, environment and society at large. Side-effects of
innovative practices can thus be addressed, e.g. change in energy policy due to a reduction of
waste available for energy recovery. Bringing end-users closer to the design and production
phases, and customising the production and delivery of goods and associated services can
boost new consumption patterns that add greater value and reduce over-production, waste and
other negative environmental impacts. The involvement of end-users in designing circular
economic models that better respond to their needs can enable the development of valueadded
solutions and act as a driver for Europe's re-industrialisation

b) Systemic services for the circular economy (2017): To demonstrate through large scale
projects the economic and environmental feasibility of circular economic business models that
underpin new services based on performance/functionality rather than ownership, and/or on
mass customisation, including through supporting demand side measures. Proposals should
adopt a systemic eco-innovative approach addressing all forms of innovation, combining
technological, organisational, societal, cultural and behavioural innovation, and strengthening
the participation of civil society. Such an approach can foster new forms of collaboration
between end-users, producers and researchers. In particular proposals should consider ways of
supporting co-creation by developing, experimenting and demonstrating new business models
together with end-users, taking into consideration their needs, including gender dimension,
thus enabling the development of value adding solutions. Business models that foster new
services and consumption and production patterns will require support to end-users in the
transition to the circular economy by raising awareness and knowledge sharing activities on
circular economy models. The proposals should include an outline business plan which can be
developed further in the course of the project.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between
EUR 4 million and EUR 7 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed
appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals
requesting other amounts.

Within the projects funded, additional or follow-up funding should be sought, be it
private or public, so as to achieve a more effective implementation and deployment at larger
scale and scope of the innovative solutions addressed. Additional funding sources could
include relevant regional/national schemes under the European Structural and Investment
Funds (ESIF), such as under the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), or other
relevant funds such as the Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA II). In the latter case,
contacts could be established with the funds managing body during the duration of the
projects. In case of relevance for the Research and Innovation Smart Specialisation Strategies,
the project proposals could already indicate which interested regions/countries have been preidentified.
Please note, however, that reference to such additional or follow-up funding will
not lead automatically to a higher score in the evaluation of the proposal.

Within the projects funded, possible regulatory barriers should also be addressed, as
appropriate. In particular 'Innovation Deals' may be proposed. By 'Innovation Deal' a bottomup
approach to address regulatory bottlenecks to innovation is understood, that would take the
form of voluntary agreements, with the European Commission and external stakeholders, with
the aim of identifying and overcoming regulatory barriers and thus facilitating the market uptake
of innovative solutions.

A life cycle thinking and assessment, in line with the recommendations and reference data
from the European Platform on Life Cycle Assessment when applicable, should be applied.

Expected Impact:
The testing and demonstrating of circular economic business models and services,
including logistics and ICT capabilities, based on performance/functionality enhancement, is
expected to measurably contribute in the medium term to:
• creating markets for new products/services (e.g. leasing or 'sharing' practices) which
empower end-users in their choice for more sustainable consumption patterns, and
require the implementation of innovative producer responsibility or other sectorial or
cross-sectorial governance schemes;
• enabling the development of new approaches for designing products/services that
collectively consider end-users, brand owners, as well as entrepreneurs, and researchers,
and deliver the needs of end-users;
• reducing supply chain length, thus increasing resource efficiency and reducing adverse
impacts on the environment, including on climate change;
• facilitating the inclusion of resource or materials criteria in designing products/services
(e.g. durability, reparability and recyclability), thus contributing to an increase in
resource and energy efficiency, and reduced environmental impacts, in the whole life
cycle of products;
• creating new business opportunities for industry and SMEs in the EU, contributing to the
exploitation of EU innovative solutions, and improving the competitiveness of European
enterprises in the global market for eco-innovative solutions;
• demonstrating the economic, social, cultural and environmental sustainability of the
proposed approaches and main elements that a business plan should include in order to
realise them, including the assessment of possible positive and negative side-effects and
risks, such as those associated with harmful substances potentially present in recycled
materials;
• providing evidence-based knowledge regarding the enabling framework conditions (such
as the regulatory or policy framework or cultural factors) that facilitate a broader
transition to a circular economy in the EU;
• implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular SDG 12 'Ensure
sustainable consumption and production patterns', as well as the conclusions of the
COP21 Paris Agreement14.

Type of Action: Innovation action
CIRC-02b-2017Water in the context of the circular economy - Towards the next generation of water systems and services – large scale demonstration projectsd.l. 07-03-2017
Call H2020-CIRC-2017-two-stage (subcall de: H2020-CIRC-2016-2017)
Circular Economy
Orçamento 70,00 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de fecho 2ª Fase: 5 Setembro 2017
Specific Challenge: The European water sector has a prominent position in economy and
society, but it is very diverse and fragmented. It needs to revolutionise the way public and
private actors work together so as to address water-related challenges and seize on
opportunities strengthening a demand-driven approach. A systemic approach, incorporating
both the physical structure of the system and the rules governing the operation, performance
and interactions of its components, could address those issues in an integrated manner. Such
an approach should go beyond the pursuit of wastewater treatment and reduction of water use
to inspire technological, organisational and social innovation through the whole value chain of
water (i.e. water as a resource, as a productive input and as a waste stream), moving towards a
circular economy approach.

More specifically, with an increasing global demand for food, feed and fibre, the demand for
nutrients is growing. Although increasing food and biomass production necessitates a higher
application of nutrients, current fertilisation practices use resources inefficiently. At the same
time accumulation of nutrients is causing major environmental problems. The EU legislation
is already aiming at regulating nutrient emissions to the environment but more can be done to
encourage a transition to an efficient nutrient recovery and recycling. Water is the most used
carrier of nutrients and, at the same time, an important resource itself. Water treatment
management models and technologies have the potential to create new business opportunities
for an extensive nutrient recovery and contribute to the circular economy. However, an
extensive implementation of integrated nutrient recovery technologies and the use of the
recovered nutrients at European level is still lacking and this is proposed to be addressed in
the 2016 call for proposals.

In addition, today's water services aim mainly to save water and to improve its quality.
However, water becomes more and more a scarce resource as a result of urbanisation,
increased competition between various uses, economic sectors and extreme weather events.

To deal effectively with these pressures, there is a need for improving water systems by
considering the whole water-use production chain and by identifying solutions that enhance
both the economic and environmental performance of the system. These innovative solutions
should be in line with the objectives of the circular economy, contributing to the challenges of
a depletion of raw materials (e.g. through the recovery of resources from waste water) and
climate change (reducing energy needs or producing energy) and should be demonstrated at
large scale. This is proposed to be addressed in the 2017 call for proposals.

b) Towards the next generation of water systems and services – large scale
demonstration projects (2017):
The objective of this topic is to demonstrate innovative
solutions at a large scale (i.e regions, cities and/or river basins), in line with EIP Water
priorities and the objectives of the Water Framework Directive. Proposals should focus on
developing the water services of the future, going beyond water supply sustainability
addressing the different water value chains. They should integrate, for instance, the
management of water resources and the provision of water services, expanding the re-use of
treated waste water and the use of desalinated water (where appropriate), ensuring carbon
neutral water services, and closing the water cycle by increasing the efficiency of wastewater
treatment plants, including the recovery of energy and the re-use of chemicals and nutrients.
Projects should build on experience already gained in areas where integration of various
aspects of water management and other economic and social activities is already taking place
at different levels, with replication potential in other areas of Europe or at wider scale, thus
demonstrating a real added-value at EU level.

Successful projects should engage all relevant
stakeholders, especially user communities, at an early stage in the co-creation process,
bringing together technology push and application pull. This is also necessary to show the
potential of using systemic eco-innovative approaches in water, to overcome related barriers
and bottlenecks and to create new opportunities for jobs and growth in various regions and
river basins. Participation of industry partners from relevant sectors is considered essential
and the active participation of SMEs is encouraged. The application of new business models
and new value chains is encouraged. The proposals should include an outline business plan
which can be developed further in the course of the project. Where relevant, integrated
environmental impact assessments and risk assessment of potential harmful substances should
be considered. Relevant socio-economic issues, in particular, regulatory/governance issues,
social behaviour and acceptability should also be addressed, requiring the participation of
social sciences and humanities disciplines such as political sciences, economics, governance
and business studies. To enhance the systemic approach and the transformation of water
services toward a more circular economy approach, digital technologies and ICT tools should
be also considered. Activities aiming at facilitating the market uptake of innovative solutions,
including standardisation, should also be addressed.

Within the projects funded, additional or follow-up funding should be sought, be it private or
public, so as to achieve a more effective implementation and deployment at larger scale and
scope of the innovative solutions addressed. Additional funding sources could include
relevant regional/national schemes under the European Structural and Investment Funds
(ESIF), such as under the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), or other relevant
funds such as the Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA II). In these cases, contacts
could be established with the funds' managing body during the duration of the projects. In
case of relevance for the Research and Innovation Smart Specialisation Strategies, the project
proposals could already indicate which interested regions/countries have been pre-identified.
Please note, however, that reference to such additional or follow-up funding will not lead
automatically to a higher score in the evaluation of the proposal.
Where technological innovation is concerned, TRL 5-7 should be achieved.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of a range of
EUR 10 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately.

Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other
amounts.

For both (2016 and 2017): Within the projects funded, possible regulatory barriers should
also be addressed, as appropriate. In particular 'Innovation Deals' may be proposed. By
'Innovation Deal' an innovative better regulation instrument is understood, in the form of
voluntary agreements with external stakeholders to identify and overcome regulatory barriers
to innovative solutions that would enable policy or legislative objectives to be better achieved.

Expected Impact: Projects are expected to contribute to:

b)
• significant reduction of the current water and energy consumption at regional and/or
river basin scale by closing the cycles of material, water and energy, using alternative
water sources and supporting the transition towards smart water services;
• interconnectivity between the water system and other economic and social sectors;
• increased public involvement in water management;
• increased citizen satisfaction with water services;
• replication of new business models in other areas and replication of models for synergies
between appropriate funding instruments at regional, national or European level;
• closing of the infrastructure and investment gap in the water service sector;
• creation of new markets in the short and medium term;
• providing evidence-based knowledge regarding the enabling framework conditions (such
as the regulatory or policy framework) that facilitate a broader transition to a circular
economy in the EU;
• implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular SDG 12 'Ensure
sustainable consumption and production patterns' and SDG 6 'Ensure availability and
sustainable management of water and sanitation for all', as well as the conclusions of the
COP21 Paris Agreement.

Type of Action: Innovation action
SC5-1b-2017Exploiting the added value of climate services - From climate service concepts to piloting and proof-of-conceptd.l. 07-03-2017
Call H2020-SC5-2017-one-stage (subcall de: H2020-SC5-2016-2017)
Greening the Economy
Orçamento 92,10 M€

Climate services

Specific Challenge: Responding to the climate change challenge requires climate-informed
decision-making at all levels. The challenge is to minimise risks and costs and to seize
opportunities. Climate services (see introduction to this section of the call for a definition) have the potential
to build the intelligence behind this transition, through the transformation of the wealth of
data, information, model output and related methodologies into customised services and
products that mainstream climate change into decisions and actions at all levels.
Bringing climate services to the market requires serving the demand of end-users and
developing the business interface between suppliers and users of climate services.
The specific challenge of this action lies in the development of climate services concepts that
are ready to be used, or show potential for future deployment, demonstrating the added value
of using climate information and services by end-users in their operational decision-making.

Scope: This action addresses areas where climate services show potential for being developed.
Increasing the added value of climate services relies on matching the demand for services and
the competences in the field. However, the availability of data, information and services does
not always correspond to users' needs. Within a co-designed process, there is a need to
develop future applications in the most promising fields and to mobilise end-user
communities where demonstration projects are not yet feasible. This action should co-design
(involving both suppliers/purveyors and users) pilot applications that support the proof-ofconcept
phase of climate services with high added-value in potential markets. The action
should create case studies to address methodological issues, develop the user/provider
interface, and test the relevance of climate services with a view to co-designing demonstration
projects with the end-users at a later stage.

This action focuses on broad areas of application with a European or global scope. Proposals
should take into account and where possible build upon activities addressed by other
initiatives such as the ERA-NET Cofund action on climate services opened in the Horizon
2020 Societal Challenge 5 call of 2015.
Actions should foresee activities to cluster with other projects financed under this topic and –
if possible – also under other parts of Horizon 2020.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU in the range
of EUR 5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately.
Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other
amounts.

Expected Impact: The project results are expected to contribute to:
• providing added-value for the decision-making process addressed by the project, in
terms of effectiveness, value creation, optimised opportunities and minimised risk;
• enhancing the potential for market uptake of climate services demonstrated by
addressing the added value;
• ensuring the replicability of the methodological frameworks for value added climate
services in potential end-user markets;
• promoting a better informed and connected end-user community; implementing the
Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular SDG 13 'Take urgent action to
combat climate change and its impacts', as well as the conclusions of the COP21 Paris
Agreement.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action
SC5-13c-2017New solutions for sustainable production of raw materials - New sensitive exploration technologiesd.l. 07-03-2017
Call H2020-SC5-2017-one-stage (subcall de: H2020-SC5-2016-2017)
Greening the Economy
Orçamento 92,10 M€

Raw Materials

Specific Challenge: The EU is highly dependent on raw materials that are crucial for a strong
European industrial base, an essential building block of the EU's growth and competitiveness.
Securing the sustainable access to raw materials, including metals, industrial minerals and
construction raw materials, and particularly Critical Raw Materials (CRM), for the EU
economy is of high importance. However, the EU is confronted with a number of
technological challenges along the entire raw materials production value chain of primary and
secondary raw materials. There is also a need for clean and sustainable raw materials
production solutions to avoid environmental damage.

This specific challenge is identified in the Priority Area 'Technologies for primary and
secondary raw materials’ production of the European Innovation Partnership (EIP) on Raw
Materials.

Scope: All proposals should develop sustainable systemic solutions through industrially- and
user-driven multidisciplinary consortia covering the relevant value chain of non-energy non-agricultural
raw materials.

Assessment of the related environmental, social and safety risks and a plan to communicate
the added value of the proposal to the local communities and society for improving public
acceptance and trust should be addressed by all the proposals. Participation of civil society
from the start of exploration until after-mining activities in a process of co-design, codevelopment
and co-implementation is strongly encouraged.

Projects should include a work-package to cluster with other projects financed under this topic
and – if possible – with other relevant projects in the field funded by Horizon 2020, in support
of the EIP on Raw Materials.

In line with the EU's strategy for international co-operation in research and innovation
(COM(2012)497) international co-operation is encouraged.

Proposals should develop solutions validated in lab or in industrially relevant environment,
finishing at the level of Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) 4-5.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between
EUR 3 million and EUR 7 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed
appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals
requesting other amounts.

Proposals should develop new and more sensitive environmentally
sound exploration technologies and solutions (such as remote 
sensing technologies, innovative multi-method approaches to reprocess existing or new
geophysical data) able to identify targets for detailed exploration on the land with lower costs,
leading to finding new deposits and to re-assessing the mineral potential for the EU. Any of
the metallic, industrial and/or construction minerals could be targeted. The importance of the
targeted raw materials for the EU economy has to be duly demonstrated in the proposal.
Proposals should include the participation of technology oriented SMEs, as far as possible.
Sea exploration is not targeted by this call.

Expected Impact: Projects are expected to justify and provide evidence that they lead to:

achieving the objectives of the EIP on Raw Materials, particularly in terms of ensuring
the sustainable supply of raw materials to the EU and improving supply conditions
within the EU;
• pushing the EU to the forefront in the area of sustainable exploration technologies and
solutions through generated know how (planned patents, publications in high impact
journals and joint public-private publications etc.);
• increasing the reserves of various primary raw materials within the EU;
• reducing the exploration costs for the industry through new cost-effective exploration
technologies, while safe-guarding long- and short-term environmental stability;
• in longer term improving the competitiveness of and creating added value and new jobs
in raw materials producing, equipment manufacturing, information and communication
technologies and/or downstream industries;
• improving the awareness, acceptance and trust of society in a sustainable raw materials
production in the EU.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action
SC5-18-2017Novel in-situ observation systemsd.l. 07-03-2017
Call H2020-SC5-2017-one-stage (subcall de: H2020-SC5-2016-2017)
Greening the Economy
Orçamento 92,10 M€

Earth Observation

Specific Challenge: A more systematic observation of the Earth system is required at a
resolution and accuracy that cannot always be provided through remote sensing technologies.
There is therefore a need to extend and improve the in-situ component of the Global Earth
Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) and of the EU Copernicus programme in order to
collect the relevant data necessary to cover observation gaps, calibrate and validate remotesensing
data and deliver Earth Observation services, including monitoring variables, for
policy makers, local users and citizens.

However, components of existing in-situ observing and monitoring systems are too often
bulky, expensive and power hungry, which hinders their wide-scale deployment for
continuous environmental monitoring. The challenge here is to explore and test new
technological solutions that would lower the costs of acquiring, deploying and maintaining
monitoring and observing stations which would contribute to filling the in-situ observational
gaps of Earth observation systems. This issue is especially acute in less developed countries
where in-situ Earth observation capacities have deteriorated.

Scope: Actions should develop new, in-situ Earth observation systems, taking advantage of
new technology and the latest developments in sensor science so that measurements can be
performed using low energy sensors and communication systems, requiring less demanding
maintenance. Actions should focus on the transfer and adaptation of new technologies into
operational systems, enabling a real breakthrough in the efficiency of deploying and
maintaining new in-situ observing systems in a cost-effective way. The research and
innovation activities under this topic may take into account concepts such as citizens'
observatories, disposable sensors, and the use of unmanned platforms. The project should take
into account as much as possible relevant research outcomes from programmes of the
European Research Council, the Leadership in Enabling and Industrial Technologies and the
European Metrology Research Programme.

Prominent criteria for the selection of the projects will be fulfilling agreed European and
international standards regarding the quality of the measurements, and the interoperability for
data exchange with other existing monitoring and observing platforms and with user
applications. Proposals should establish formal links, where appropriate, with the GEO Global
Initiatives (e.g. GEOGLAM, GEOBON, GFOI, GMOS, AFRIGEOSS, BLUE PLANET) and
with the relevant Copernicus services so that the new monitoring and observing platforms
fulfil well-identified needs under these two major initiatives. Test phases enabling proof-ofconcept
of the observation and monitoring platforms in real conditions should be organised
during the course of the project. Participation of SMEs in project consortia is encouraged in
order to facilitate the development of innovative and operational systems.

Projects should foresee activities to cluster with other projects financed under this topic and –
if possible – also under other parts of Horizon 2020.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between
EUR 4 million and EUR 5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed
appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals
requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact: The project results are expected to contribute to:

• improved in-situ components of the GEOSS and Copernicus programmes;
• cost-effectiveness of the new systems when compared to previous ones;
• new opportunities and market development of the European Earth observation
commercial sector and for downstream users;
• measurable added value for the Copernicus and/or GEOSS initiatives;
• the provision of information necessary to ensure food, water and energy security, to cope
with the scarcity of natural resources, to develop mitigation and adaptation solutions to
climate change, and to make communities more resilient to natural hazards;
• implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular SDG 9 'Build
resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster
innovation'.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action
SC5-19-2017Coordination of citizens' observatories initiativesd.l. 07-03-2017
Call H2020-SC5-2017-one-stage (subcall de: H2020-SC5-2016-2017)
Greening the Economy
Orçamento 92,10 M€
Specific Challenge: Citizens' observatories55 are community-based environmental monitoring
and information systems which build on innovative and novel Earth observation applications
embedded in portable or mobile personal devices. Thanks to the vast array of ubiquitous
information and data they can provide, citizens' observatories can enable authorities to obtain
evidence and inform environmental policy making, complementing more authoritative in-situ
observation and monitoring networks and systems with a very positive cost-benefit ratio.

Citizens are also provided with new opportunities to address environmental issues affecting
them and to influence local decision making. Social innovation can be achieved through these
novel partnerships which involve the private and public sector, NGOs and citizens, offering
new business opportunities for SMEs in the fields of Earth observation and mobile
technologies.
These activities are, however, at an early stage and still largely rely on research funding.
Risks and opportunities still have to be explored, which requires a comprehensive analysis of
their full potential and applicability. There is a need to create a citizens' observatories
knowledge base in Europe across disciplines to avoid duplication, ensure interoperability,
create synergies and facilitate its gradual uptake by environmental authorities. With an
increasing number of citizen-based initiatives, a coordinated approach for the integration of
citizens' observations is becoming necessary in Earth observation systems at local, regional
and also global level.

Scope: This action should bring environmental citizens' observatories and related
communities together with existing relevant activities to benchmark and pinpoint best
practices, identify barriers and synergies, promote standards, facilitate integration and
stronger cooperation solutions, and stimulate a gradual uptake by public authorities of these
new technological and methodological approaches. Relevant issues such as technologies and
methodologies for engaging citizens, social innovation opportunities, sustainability
approaches including the role of the European private sector, especially SMEs, as well as data
management and interoperability of platforms should be addressed. A coherent approach
should also be taken to ensuring the delivery and uptake of in-situ data and information
coming from citizens observatories through GEOSS and Copernicus. Hence, proposals should
include a broad range of stakeholders, including public bodies, private sector representatives,
research institutions – including from social sciences and humanities – NGOs and citizens'
associations.

To address these points effectively, social science research tools and methods will be
required.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU in the range
of EUR 1 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately.
Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other
amounts. Up to one action shall be funded.

Expected Impact: The project results are expected to contribute to:
• improved coordination between existing environmental citizens' observatories and
related activities at regional, European and international level;
• expanded geographical coverage and use of environmental citizens' observation through
an effective promotion and uptake of best practices and standards;
• wider dissemination and uptake of efficient information and data management and
preservation strategies for existing and future citizens' observatory platforms;
• increased opportunities for SMEs and businesses in the field of in-situ Earth observation
systems;
• better awareness and use of the citizens' observatories by environmental and disaster risk
and emergency management decision makers;
• increased value added of GEOSS and Copernicus through the use of citizens'
observations;
• a leading role for Europe in the integration and uptake of citizens' information in
GEOSS;implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular SDG 9
'Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and
foster innovation'.

Type of Action: Coordination and support action
SC5-21b-2017Cultural heritage as a driver for sustainable growth - b) Heritage-led rural regenerationd.l. 07-03-2017
Call H2020-SC5-2017-two-stage (subcall de: H2020-SC5-2016-2017)
Greening the Economy
Orçamento 91,00 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de fecho 2ª Fase: 5 Setembro 2017

Cultural heritage for sustainable growth

Specific Challenge: European cities and rural areas are unique cultural landscapes full of
character at the core of Europe's identity. They are examples of our living heritage which is
continually evolving and being added to. However some of them are facing economic, social
and environmental problems, resulting in unemployment, disengagement, depopulation,
marginalisation or loss of cultural and biological diversity. These challenges create demand
for testing and experimenting with innovative pathways for regeneration. Cultural heritage
(both tangible and intangible) can be used as a driver for the sustainable growth of urban and
rural areas, as a factor of production and competitiveness and a means for introducing socially
and environmentally innovative solutions. The overall challenge is to go far beyond simple
conservation, restoration, physical rehabilitation or repurposing of a site and to demonstrate
heritage potential as a powerful economic, social and environmental catalyst for regeneration,
sustainable development, economic growth and improvement of people’s well-being and
living environments.

Scope: Proposals should address one of the following:

b) Heritage-led rural regeneration (2017)
Actions should develop and deploy via large-scale demonstration projects novel
heritage-led systemic approaches65 and solutions for sustainable growth. In order to pave the
way for their rapid replication and up-scaling, a 'Role models' and 'Replicators' approach
should be implemented.

The 'Role models' are urban or rural landscapes which have demonstrably and successfully
pursued a heritage-led regeneration.
The ‘Replicators’ are urban or rural landscapes that will be assisted/mentored by 'Role
models' and committed to their heritage-led regeneration within the duration of the project,
replicating the heritage-led regeneration 'blueprints' of the 'Role models', properly
contextualised to fit their particular contexts. The ‘Replicators’ will therefore proactively seek
advice, assistance and mentoring from the 'Role models', have privileged contact with them
and access to their know-how, and will participate in the definition of user requirements and
the methodology for transferability of solutions, data collection etc.

The higher the number of 'Role models' and 'Replicators' involved, the larger the evidence
base and hence the replicability and up-scalability potential of the project outputs under
different contexts. The Commission considers that involving six 'Role models' and three
'Replicators' from different Member States/Associated Countries would greatly enhance the
potential of a proposal for replicating and up-taking of the results across Europe. Beyond this
and in line with the strategy for EU international cooperation in research and innovation
(COM(2012)497), participation of 'Role models' from non-EU countries is encouraged, since
this would further enrich the evidence base of successfully implemented heritage-led
regenerations and would thus enhance the replication and impact potential of such activities in
non-EU regions (e.g. Latin America) and countries.

Replication critically depends on the timely and active involvement of the ‘Replicators’ in the
project development, the effective and continuous knowledge transfer, mentoring, networking
and support by the 'Role models' (e.g. through staff exchanges to enhance their capacity in,
among other things, securing the financial resources necessary for the regeneration through
innovative financing and business models, partnerships (e.g. public/ private) and mobilisation
of investments). The success potential of the proposal will be assessed according to the
innovative nature and the replicability potential of the approach; the financing, business and
governance models; the mobilisation of new investments; the participatory, multi-stakeholder
and trans-disciplinary processes (also securing citizens' engagement and ownership of
regeneration plans); the long-term political and financial commitment of the competent
authorities in the 'Replicators' to guarantee the project implementation, independently of
possible changes in their political context during the course of the project; the capacity for
mobilising and leveraging additional investments to secure economic and financial
sustainability for the execution of the project; and the soundness of the approach in
'mentoring' and transferring knowledge from the 'Role models' to the 'Replicators' and
beyond. Partnerships should involve local and regional authorities, planners, enterprises,
academics and local communities in a clearly defined structure with roles and responsibilities
properly spelled out for all involved parties. The participation of social sciences and
humanities disciplines such as architecture, archaeological sciences, cultural anthropology,
law, economics, governance, planning, cultural and historical studies, is critical to properly
address the complex challenges of this topic.

Projects should aim to:
• map, analyse and systematically document successful heritage-led regeneration models
in 'Role models', linking where appropriate cultural and natural heritage; make this
evidence base readily accessible to an EU-wide community of competent and interested
authorities, planners, practitioners, enterprises and stakeholders (including civil society)
through innovative communication and training strategies. Particular emphasis should be
paid to successful business and management models, financing mechanisms, leveraging
of investments, governance structures, urban and territorial plans and legal frameworks.
'Role models' would, if they so wish, also have the possibility of further upscaling their
regeneration activities during the life of the project;
• assist 'Replicators' through provision of expertise, advice and capacity building in
developing and implementing during the life of the project their heritage-led
regeneration plans, including appropriate business and management models, financing
mechanisms, governance structures, planning tools and legal frameworks;
• set up a robust monitoring scheme to monitor the performance of the deployed
regeneration scheme, so as to assess the impact for the targeted rural and urban areas in
an as quantifiable way as possible against a well-defined baseline at the time of the
proposal. Performance monitoring should last for a period of at least 2 years within the
life of the project. Longer term monitoring commitment beyond the end of the project,
while continuing the systematic documentation of the data, will give an added value to
the proposal;
• develop methodologies enabling the replication and up-scaling of heritage-led urban
regeneration projects in different contexts, including replication of innovative investment
strategies, governance and business models;
• identify potential regulatory, economic and technical barriers and propose concrete ways
to optimise policy and regulatory and administrative frameworks;
• establish long-term sustainable data platforms securing open, consistent data and
performance measurements and interoperability of data infrastructures to ensure
effective communication, public consultation, exchange of practices and sharing of
experiences and a continuous building up of the 'knowledge portfolio' through future
activities under Horizon 2020 and beyond, and long-term (i.e. beyond the life of the
project) exploitability of the results.
Proposals shall address all of the above points.
Projects should envisage resources for clustering with other projects financed under this topic
as well as other projects under the 'Cultural Heritage for sustainable growth' part of this call
and – if possible – also under other relevant parts of Horizon 2020.
Because of the substantial investments that might be necessary for the heritage-led
regeneration in the urban and rural context, additional or follow-up funding should be sought,
be it private or public, from relevant regional/national schemes under the European Structural
and Investment Funds (ESIF), including the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF),
or other relevant funds such as the Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA II). In the
case of ESIF/IPA, contacts could be established with the funds' managing body during the
duration of the projects. In case of relevance for the Research and Innovation Smart
Specialisation Strategies, the project proposals could already indicate which interested
regions/countries have been pre-identified. Please note, however, that reference to such
additional or follow-up funding will not lead automatically to a higher score in the evaluation
of the proposal.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to a
maximum of EUR 10 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed
appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals
requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact: Projects are expected to contribute to:

• providing new heritage-led urban and rural regeneration paradigms, up-scalable and
replicable, replacing the object-oriented approach with a spatial approach in heritage
planning and offering new economic and investment opportunities, new products and
services, reduced regulative and administrative barriers, innovative governance adopting
trans-disciplinary and participatory approaches and promoting citizens’ engagement and
new local skills and jobs;
• strengthening Europe's capacity as a world-leader in promoting, financing, developing,
managing and replicating innovative use of heritage for urban and rural regeneration in
Europe and beyond;
• securing heritage conservation and sustainability through fostering collective
management, responsibility and ownership of cultural heritage, and establishing a
“community of practice” to promote heritage potential as a production (rather than a
cost) factor to the society through unlocking its potential as a driver for regeneration and
a catalyser for economic growth and jobs;
• providing as quantifiable evidence as possible of the cultural, social, environmental and
economic benefits (e.g. set-up of companies, start-ups in new productive activities in
different fields new cultural products and services, tourism, construction industry,
developing talent, attracting new investment in the regeneration sector etc.) of heritage
reuse at different levels, including in deprived or less developed areas;
• mobilising investment and opening up of new market opportunities for businesses
through networking at European level competent authorities and stakeholders interested
in using heritage to regenerate their cities or rural areas;
• positioning Europe as a leading force in the use of heritage as a means for social, cultural
and economic development;
• assisting regions in developing their Research and Innovation Smart Specialisation
Strategies by including sound heritage-led urban and rural regeneration projects;
• implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular SDG 1 ‘End
poverty in all its forms everywhere’, SDG 10 ‘Reduce inequality within and among
countries’ and SDG 11 'Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and
sustainable'.

Type of Action: Innovation action

   

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CO-CREATION-02-2016User-driven innovation: value creation through design enabled innovationd.l. 15-11-2016
Call CO-CREATION-02-03-2016 (subcall de: H2020-SC6-CO-CREATION-2016-2017)
Orçamento 9,00 M€

Specific Challenge:

With competitiveness being increasingly based on intangibles and a mix of products and services that respond to users' needs, applying design thinking, tools and methods can improve performance and efficiency in the commercial and public sector.

Design-enabled innovation can be considered as a prominent example of “user-driven" innovation, where user involvement in the process is central, as in many cases innovation can better succeed through co-creation. User-centred design thinking and the application of design tools and methods, when applied to services, systems and organisations, enable structured service and business-model innovation, organisational innovation as well as other intangible forms of innovation. The focus is on applying design tools and methods, since this offers a systematic approach to conceive user-driven innovations. The specific challenge to be addressed by this topic is that many public sector organizations and businesses, especially SMEs, miss out on the potential to utilise design as a source for improving efficiency and stimulating growth.

Scope: 

The consortium should plan and run a European pilot including selecting and allocating funding primarily to the concept development phase of the selected projects. Aspects of inclusiveness and social objectives of addressing inequalities in citizens' access to the innovations should be taken into account. The pilot should build on national and European level actions on design, incorporating a robust selection process to ensure that projects selected are likely to be further developed and implemented beyond the concept phase. The emphasis should be on practical experimentation, piloting and demonstrating activities as well as concept testing and incubating to improve organisations' processes, services, products or business models in the private, public or third sectors. Drawing on the experience of the funded projects, the pilot will a) gather data and metrics concerning the impact of design related policies and programmes in terms of user benefit and business impact, b) develop a transferable methodology to evaluate the effectiveness of design in the innovation process, c) develop a methodology on how actors in different sectors can better connect with design enabled innovation to increase efficiency and competitiveness in their respective sectors as well as a common impact evaluation methodology and respective indicators, to be applied across sectors and scalable to organisational, regional, national and European level. The activities could also involve showcasing success stories and disseminating the accumulated knowledge, particularly illustrating the applicability and potential of design-enabled innovation for all sectors, be they public or private or commercial or non-commercial activities.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU in the order of EUR 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. This does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. This action allows for the provision of financial support to third parties in line with the conditions set out in Part K of the General Annexes to the Work Programme.

Expected Impact:

  • - Robust and commonly accepted guidance on embedding design in value-creating networks and identification of barriers and enablers; 
  • - Creation of data, data sets and metrics to evaluate impact regardless of sector;
  • - The methodology developed and the analysis will contribute to incorporating diverse user perspectives into design policies and practices and for their further development and implementation. - - - The results, e.g. the impact evaluation methodology, should be applicable and give clear guidance particularly to SMEs and public administrations;
  • - Development of new approaches and solutions which translate into new products, services and processes increasing public sector effectiveness and private sector competitiveness, and sustaining innovation capabilities and processes;
  • - Producing assessment and simulation tools to verify results in the increase of efficiency and/or effectiveness through the use of design;
  • - Mainstreaming design, making it an integral part of value creation and a self-sustaining element of innovation processes;
  • - Integration of design and user-driven innovation into innovation policies and support mechanisms, including funding programmes.

Type of Action: Coordination and support action

CO-CREATION-04-2017Applied co-creation to deliver public servicesd.l. 02-02-2017
Call CO-CREATION-2017 (subcall de: H2020-SC6-CO-CREATION-2016-2017)
Orçamento 34,05 M€
Specific Challenge:

While efforts have been made to make public services user-friendly and reduce the administrative burden, for example by making them increasingly available online, studies show that service design often does not meet the expectations of citizens and businesses, who require more usability, responsiveness and transparency, reflecting the different needs of users - some of whom may not be computer literate - and the variety of activities public services encompasses. Weak service design and high administrative burden often lead to non-use or non-take up by citizens and businesses of the public services and benefits available to them.

The profound understanding of end users including specific groups, like disabled elderly people, single parent families, disadvantaged citizens or immigrants, the re-design of services to respond to their capacities, needs and preferred delivery channels are important elements for governments to prove their ability to fulfil the needs of citizens and businesses. The old ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach is not appropriate for all spheres of the public sector; complex and varied service delivery; historical, cultural and socio-economic backgrounds play an important role in the expectations of interactions with public services.

The steady integration of new technologies into the everyday lives of people, businesses and governments is helping to open up public administrations, offering opportunities for more collaborative and participatory relationships that allow relevant stakeholders (i.e. citizens, business and non-governmental organisations) to actively shape political priorities, collaborate in the design of public services and participate in their delivery to provide more coherent and integrated solutions to complex challenges[[OECD Recommendation of the Council on Digital Government Strategies, 2014.]]. Co-creation of public services in this context is a public service that is provided by government, citizens, NGOs, private companies or individual civil servants, in collaboration or not with government institutions, based on government or non-government data or services.

Collaborative service creation (co-creation) requires public service actors to engage with stakeholders in the design, production and delivery phases, to gather the necessary user insight, re-define their operational processes and identify appropriate sustainability models to deliver an effective high quality service.

Given the opportunity to actively participate in service delivery, stakeholders (citizens, businesses, civil society organisations, social partners, etc.) can contribute distinctive resources (time, effort, ideas and expertise) and can keep public officials accountable[[United Nations eGovernment Survey 2014.]]. The increased sense of ownership, greater efforts for the sustainability of public initiatives, as well as more creative ideas lead to an important shift in the role that civil society and the private sector can play in contributing to good governance[[United Nations eGovernment Survey 2014.]]. It is also expected to help better prioritise and target public spending to the most important purposes and urgent needs.

Scope:

Innovation actions will pilot the co-designing and co-creation of public services, using ICT and relying on open data or open public services. They need to bring together a variety of actors in society, such as for example public authorities, citizens, businesses, researchers, civil society organisations, social innovators, social entrepreneurs, social partners, artists and designers, to co-create demand-driven, user-friendly, personalised public services and make effective decisions. Proposals need to identify the particular policy area, public institution or function to assess the suitability of incorporating co-creation and the transferability of good practices. Piloting needs to be carried out in a representative set of Member States in order to test different cultural/socio-political context for co-creating public services.

Proposals need to address several of the below aspects:

  • Using open services provided by public administrations and allowing third parties to design, aggregate, produce and deliver in collaboration with or without government value added complementary or new public services;
  • Demonstrating how government can act as a broad, open collaboration 'platform' in practice by demonstrating and/or piloting use cases for sharing data, services, tools, cloud infrastructures and assets between public administrations (e.g. experiments of hybrid teams in government) and resulting in re-usable services or processes;
  • Demonstrating how government can act as a broad, open collaboration 'platform' in practice by demonstrating and/or piloting use cases for sharing data, services, tools and assets with third parties and generating new or complementary services or making decisions;
  • Demonstrating how the perspectives of citizens, service users, and others can be taken on board through, for example, the use of design principles or behavioural analysis, in the creation of new public services or policies;
  • Demonstrating how transparency of government data, information or processes and the engagement of relevant stakeholders can lead to accountability and trust;
  • Developing business models that would enable financial remuneration for the public as data (or other asset) providers.

Proposals need to ensure that privacy and data protection issues have been appropriately addressed and that the tools piloted could be re-used. Any policy area may be subject to the piloting, including social policies and those addressing the vulnerable.

Proposals need to demonstrate the feasibility of their service or solution through a number of real-life pilots, demonstrate the concrete commitment of the piloting sites and need to propose a sustainability approach or model for the period beyond the project.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 4 and 5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. This does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Proposals need to demonstrate that they can achieve impact beyond the project phase, inter alia, in terms of efficiency and effectiveness gains, transactional cost reduction, productivity growth, stimulating the growth of new businesses, greater transparency leading to reduced errors and less public spending, administrative burden reduction, improved societal evidence, increased take-up of electronic public services by citizens, user satisfaction as well as in terms of the democratic dimension, such as increasing level of civic participation and social inclusion. Quantitative and qualitative aspects are to be taken into account. Additional impact may be improving the skills and adding new skills of public sector employees as well as third parties being agents and enablers of change and acting as innovation actors.

Type of Action: Innovation action
CO-CREATION-06-2017Policy-development in the age of big data: data-driven policy-making, policy-modelling and policy-implementationd.l. 02-02-2017
Call CO-CREATION-2017 (subcall de: H2020-SC6-CO-CREATION-2016-2017)
Orçamento 34,05 M€
Specific Challenge:

As societal challenges are growing more complex and interlinked, public policy innovation and experimentation, using ICT can improve the effectiveness, efficiency and the quality decisions in the public sector. Effective and reliable policies need to consider the available data (including its structure and topology) and evidence to ensure accurate and meaningful information. Big data offers many opportunities; using data analytics to generate new insights, increasing predictive power and identifying unexpected patterns and relationships that can help inform policy making. For instance data analytics tools can also help public authorities to better detect and evidence patterns of non-compliance in many policy areas affecting the health, the safety and the welfare of citizens in the internal market of goods, services and persons. Effective processing power and expertise are widely used in the retail and commercial sector, the challenge is to create effective resources to make this available to governments, allowing policy choices to become more evidence-based and analytical.

In addition, open policy-making and the integration of the citizens’ perspective through the effective engagement of relevant social actors - for example over online platforms or by crowd-sourcing - can potentially generate vast amounts of data, which can allow policy options to become more informed. Furthermore, open policy-making can support a participatory, open and collaborative government vision. Besides simulations, perceptions data pose a further promising source of information. Conducted on a regular basis, e.g. by the Eurobarometer, identifying perceived bottlenecks in relation to policy reforms as well as assessing the perceived performance of past reforms becomes feasible; in some cases these official statistics may be complemented by new sources of data. Taken together, this may lead to developing second generation data tools and assessment for more targeted policy design. It also offers opportunities for different communities to take ownership of the use and analysis of data in an age where they are at risk of being alienated by too much information. In addition, policy implementation can significantly benefit from efficient enforcement and monitoring tools that are informed by data from various sources.

Scope:

In order to enable governments - at all levels - to benefit from the availability of relevant data and thereby introduce and implement effective policies, new or improved methods and tools are needed to support and establish new types of evidence-informed policy design and implementation and to facilitate the interpretation of big data for public communication, including new outcome-based. For public administrations to experiment with the possibilities offered by big data – for example through policy modelling, monitoring, enforcing, simulation, testing, analysis and policy compliance – there is a need to thoroughly understand the legal frameworks and to take into account sociological, cultural, political, legal and economic as well as behavioural aspects. Proposals should also elaborate on the relationship between evidence-based policy-making and citizens’ participation, integrating the analysis of participatory elements.

a) Research and Innovation Actions

Proposals need to address several of the following aspects:

  • Methodological development for using big data in policy development, examining the extent to which policy-making structures and systems are ready to absorb and analyse big data;
  • Critical interdisciplinary assessment of the economic, political, epistemological, ethical and legal premises and implications of big data practices (including algorithmic governance, smart cities, etc.), allowing for the reflection on the potential benefits and risks;
  • Develop scalable and transferable methods and re-usable tools for compilation, analysis and visualisation of data, including relevant open, official or certified data;
  • Develop scalable and transferable methods and re-usable tools for mining, compilation, analysis and visualisation of data from any source, including data related to social dynamics and behaviour;
  • Develop scalable and transferable methods and re-usable tools for data curation, meta-data schemes, data linking or for reconciliation of multiple data sets to render coherent narratives;
  • Understanding the implications of the increasing materiality of data with the development of the Internet of Things and its implications for the sustainability of government’s effective use of big data for improved policy making in the longer term;
  • Develop scalable and transferable methods and re-usable tools for opinion-mining of large data sets in order to avoid the situation that the bigger the data, the less clear how they have been produced;
  • Develop scalable and transferable methods and re-usable tools for policy modelling and simulation to improve the predicative analysis capacity of governments;
  • Develop scalable and transferable methods and re-usable tools for iterative policy design and implementation (e.g. through the greater use of randomised controlled trials based on behavioural science);
  • Develop scalable and transferable methods and re-usable tools for policy enforcement and compliance monitoring tools.

Proposals should apply their methodology to policy areas addressing societal challenges (e.g. environment, migration, radicalisation, inequalities, unemployment, internal market obstacles to the free movement of persons, goods and services). When using open and big data in order to enlarge the evidence base for effective policy-making, principles such as independence, quality, coherence and consistency, confidentiality, impartiality and objectivity as well as representativeness and extrapolation to meaningful populations need to be considered. Data protection, ethical and privacy issues will also have to be addressed as well as ethical issues around storage, use and re-use of data. Application and improvement of existing quantitative tools is preferable. Sociological as well as behavioural science approaches are encouraged, especially where they aim to develop a deeper understanding of how public policy and services interact with citizens. If relevant, proposals also need to analyse the suitability of the proposed software.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 4 and 5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

b) Coordination and Support Action[[This activity is directly aimed at supporting the development and implementation of evidence base for R&I policies and supporting various groups of stakeholders. It is excluded from the delegation to Research Executive Agency and will be implemented by the Commission services.]]

The activities should aim at encouraging networking of relevant stakeholders and teams working in the area of data-driven policy-making and policy-modelling and to support constituency building. Following an assessment of the needs of public administrations, the multidisciplinary network will identify methods, tools, technologies and applications for their implementation in the public sector, taking into consideration activities also undertaken outside the European Union and considering specificities relevant to different policy domains of public activity. The activities will conclude with the outlining of a roadmap for future research directions.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU in the order of EUR 0.5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. This does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Proposals need to demonstrate the impact to be achieved after the project phase, inter alia, in terms of improved public policy effectiveness, efficiency gains, precision gains, improved consistency, and reliance on evidence leading to increased policy compliance as well as in terms of the democratic dimension, such as greater transparency, good governance, increased trust in and the perceived legitimacy of government. Additional impact may be increased accessibility to the non-governmental players.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action, Coordination and support action
ENG-GLOBALLY-01-2017Strengthening Europe's position in the global context: science diplomacy and intercultural relationsd.l. 02-02-2017
Call ENG-GLOBALLY-2017 (subcall de: H2020-SC6-ENG-GLOBALLY-2016-2017)
Orçamento 32,50 M€
Specific Challenge:

Europe is faced with numerous challenges that are increasingly global in nature and that have become of more immediate importance: peace and stability, migration, climate change, resource efficiency, health pandemics, etc. In many cases, responding to these challenges requires science-based evidence to inform decisions and joint international efforts that often include also scientific and technological cooperation. This is where science and diplomacy can join forces to form a 'soft power' tool in external policy – science diplomacy.

A main challenge is how to best link scientific expertise and cooperation with diplomacy and political influence to tackle major global challenges, promote knowledge and improve international relations. Science diplomacy has a particular added value in providing additional communication channels, particularly in stalemate situations and relations where few other mechanisms are feasible as well as on sensitive bilateral and multilateral issues. It promotes cooperation and conflict prevention, rebuilds trust and fosters shared understanding across countries, regions and cultures.

At the same time, the global context is characterised by competing understandings of central values and organising principles of society, including the meaning and direction of politics, economics, culture and ultimately human life. This context, and Europe's place in it, needs to be better understood and accounted for, from both a contemporary and a historical perspective, if the European Union and its Member States want to continue to constructively take part and strengthen their position in global discourses about what constitutes a "good society" and to understand how European policy interventions have been understood and perceived globally.

Addressing this challenge requires a great dose of (self) reflexivity about European diplomacy, Europe's own history and its interactions with third countries, regions, cultures and religions. It calls for a continued investment in fostering scientific, political, economic, social and cultural relations with other non-European global actors on all continents, and for ways in which to sustain scientific and intercultural exchanges that effectively enhance mutual understanding despite differences.

Scope:

The research to address this challenge should in particular focus on the following key dimensions. It is expected to either comprehensively address one of these dimensions or to combine two or three of them. The research may also cover other issues relevant for addressing the specific challenge.

1) Using science in the context of European diplomacy

In an increasingly complex global context, diplomacy as a social practice and profession is undergoing considerable changes. In both bi- and multilateral contexts, it is no longer sufficient for diplomats to be skilled in the art of negotiation, but they also need to have the capacity - alongside specialist knowledge – to take better advantage of science and scientific cooperation.

How to better prepare and employ 'science diplomats' remains a particularly unexplored research area. The research efforts should focus on examining the interface between scientific advice and expertise and diplomats' performance and capacity. It should analyse where science diplomacy can have the biggest impact and how it can be instrumental in strengthening EU capacities and strategic awareness and in establishing better mechanisms so as to anticipate events early and to swiftly identify common responses. This should involve 'practitioners' of science diplomacy.

Research should explore under which conditions science and scientific cooperation have contributed positively or negatively to reaching foreign policy objectives (peace, security, trade, development, humanitarian aid) in various challenging contexts and draw recommendations for the development of new actions at EU and Member States levels.

2) European culture, values and reflections of Europe's colonial past in contemporary European societies

European values are to a large extent determinants of behaviour. As values stay behind many societal patterns and organising principles of society, the knowledge of the past development of European values as well as the knowledge of their contemporary status could help to understand many aspects of behaviour of contemporary European populations.

Multidisciplinary research associating scholars from the humanities and social sciences should adopt an outside-in perspective on contemporary European societies and trace the manifold non-European and European colonial era-related determinants of present-day societal and cultural diversity in Europe. In so doing, it should pay particular attention to the way societal and cultural influences from outside of Europe have historically been framed, contested, transformed, refused or taken up in European societies. It should elucidate how and why some of these influences were able to strongly impact European societies, values, activities and culture, and why others were less successful.

Research under this topic will lead to a sound understanding of the social, cultural, linguistic and political legacies of colonialism within Europe and globally. It will assess their implications for policy-making, EU values and intercultural and interlinguistic dialogue, including the construction of plural cultural identities in nations and countries of Europe.

3) Global trends of secularisation and religious radicalisation and the role of Europe

Over the centuries the relations between the state and religion were of key importance for the functioning of state and society. Today's world is divided between secular states where government is officially separated from religion and states where this distinction is blurred, in addition to a few theocratic states. Whereas secular states are spread all over the world, and the religions professed and practiced by their citizens represent the widest possible spectrum of beliefs, the majority of countries which have embraced religion as their central norm are predominantly, although not exclusively, following Islam and are located in Africa, the Middle East, the Mediterranean region and Asia. A wide array of differences between official norms and practices still exist and should be taken into account in order to avoid undue generalisations between such countries and states.

Taking account of the diversity of forms of secularism and religion, and adopting a historical perspective, this multidisciplinary social sciences and humanities research should investigate and compare various types and experiences of the functioning of secular and religion-based states in and outside Europe. Its findings should clarify reasons for, and pathways of, transformation of the role of religion in state governance, and should explain differing perspectives of cultural and political co-existence within the polity. Specific attention should be paid to the analysis of the impact of religious radicalisation all over the world and its consequences on states' peaceful coexistence as well as of the foreign fighter phenomenon. Research should also focus on what these trends mean in terms of internal and foreign policies for the European Union, its Member States and the state-religion relationships on the European continent. In this perspective, it could also include the possible forms of injustice, inequality and exclusion that may contribute to societal tension and marginalisation of certain minority groups, as well as the common elements between religion-based values system and secular systems that could help to counter radicalisation.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU in the order of EUR 2.5 million for each dimension would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. This does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Research under this topic is expected to impact the foreign policies of the EU and its member states and provide enhanced coordination between them and between the EU and its international partners. It will provide in-depth insights into the multiple ties and mutual influences between Europe and its neighbours, former colonies and other countries and regions, especially in the scientific, socioeconomic, historical cultural and religious spheres. It will also provide a sound understanding of contemporary European societies, of the multiple sources and expressions of diversity in the EU and of how non-European influences impact on the formation of European identities. Acknowledging the multiple sources of today's European diversity will have strong policy implications, not just for scientific and cultural policy, but also for immigration, integration, education and external policies. It will also facilitate Europe's future engagement with third countries.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action
CULT-COOP-09-2017European cultural heritage, access and analysis for a richer interpretation of the past.d.l. 02-02-2017
Call H2020-CULT-COOP-2017 (subcall de: H2020-SC6-CULT-COOP-2016-2017)
UNDERSTANDING EUROPE - PROMOTING THE EUROPEAN PUBLIC AND CULTURAL SPACE
Orçamento 50,00 M€
Specific Challenge:

Collections in archives, museums, and at cultural heritage sites contain a wealth of digital texts, images, audio-visual content and 3D representations of objects or scenes as well as other information such as multispectral or thermal imaging revealing the actual state of conservation, which are largely inaccessible to both computers and humans. In addition, human beings as members of their societies can be regarded as natural archives entail information about the complex semantic and conceptual knowledge organizing a society in its cultural settings and stored in non-verbal practices and rites as well as in language.

Humans can easily extract meaning from individual digital assets but are quickly overwhelmed by the sheer number of items which are usually spatially and/or temporally disconnected and of different digital quality. New technologies can be a valuable instrument to process large amounts of data in order to identify new correlations and interpretations and extract new meaning from our cultural and intellectual heritage. To close, or at least narrow, the "semantic gap" would present a major step forward in digital humanities and other sciences related to European heritage, memory, identity and cultural interaction. Likewise, it is of immediate relevance to find new ways of accessing the complex information embodied in culture-related human ‘natural archives'. In addition, the increase and growing complexity of digital cultural material raises new challenges as regards its preservation over time, an essential condition for re-use and study.

Scope:

In order to better understand and inform the present by richer interpretations of the past, actions should create affordable and efficient digital access, documentary methods analysis and preservation services for cultural resources. This should be achieved by tackling issues such as automatic contextualisation and identification of content and by developing analytical tools, including methods for automatically finding content which is semantically similar to a given item, or content which is related to a given high-level concept. This aspect also calls for fundamental work related to the philosophy of meta-data designs especially of language-based data that should be in close coherence with the architecture and typology of human conceptual systems. Actions should also develop innovative tools and methods to extract meaning from digital artefacts (including video recordings, audio recordings, digital images, text, multispectral and thermal information and 3D representations of objects or scenes) considering also the spatio-temporal dimension and the quality of the digital content in order to allow the study and preservation of European heritage. The work must fundamentally address the issue of data quality and interoperability.

Work will be performed in close collaboration with Humanities and Social Sciences researchers.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 2 and 3 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. This does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

New ways of taking into account the state of the art in computer science and big data management, of searching European digital content which used to be inaccessible, buried among huge amounts of data and not sufficiently tagged with adequate metadata.

Improve the understanding of the rich diversity of European cultural heritage and create added value for the society by providing humanities researchers, journalists, policy makers and the interested public with new ways of finding answers to their questions about European cultural heritage and history.

Types of Action: RIA - Research and Innovation Actions

CULT-COOP-11-2016/2017Understanding the transformation of European public administrationsd.l. 02-02-2017
Call H2020-CULT-COOP-2017 (subcall de: H2020-SC6-CULT-COOP-2016-2017)
UNDERSTANDING EUROPE - PROMOTING THE EUROPEAN PUBLIC AND CULTURAL SPACE
Orçamento 50,00 M€
Specific Challenge:

Public administrations are important actors in the European society to deliver public goods and values, from protecting vulnerable people to finding out information on waste collection. They have a complex and varied function, providing essential support, defining rules in a complex society. Due to different historical backgrounds, they are also organised very differently and play different roles across Europe. Today, the continuous improvement of public administrations, public services and policies is at the heart of the agenda of policy-makers. While new organisational structures, concepts and digital tools have contributed to increasing the efficiency, effectiveness, inclusiveness and quality of public administrations, today's societal challenges are ever more complex and inter-linked. Simultaneously, economic and budgetary pressures constrain the public sector, while governments need to renew their legitimacy, addressing the increasing and ever more complex expectations from citizens and businesses. Citizens call for more efficient and accountable use of public funds, meaningful participation in public affairs and for services that are as easy to use and personalised as for example electronic banking. There is a need to find ways that more effectively create public value - related to quality of public service delivery, public sector efficiency, social inclusion and participation, public trust and good governance - in an environment of constant change. Addressing these complex issues requires holistic responses, which in turn call for the transformation of public administrations and its role in society.

Effective collaboration across government departments and with non-governmental actors is essential to good governance. It requires working across portfolio boundaries to jointly achieve integrated responses to the issues of policy development. In addition, effective collaboration with societal actors in public service delivery and policy-making can help governments improve their ability to address user needs and innovate their problem solving capacity. ICT is a key enabler to facilitate this. Effective engagement with societal actors can help unlock societal assets, thereby easing the resource needs on governments, allow new services and new businesses to be born and help citizens to actively participate in the decisions that affect their lives. It allows them to be involved in the co-creation of services, including their design and delivery, as well as in finding solutions to societal challenges[[United Nations eGovernment Survey 2014]]. Collaboration, sharing and re-use between public administrations can help reduce administrative burden, waste and duplication and drive efficiency.

This calls for innovative and collaborative mechanisms with new institutional arrangements, leadership and human resources’ capacities and structures for greater collaboration among government agencies and departments and with other actors. It requires reflecting upon the likely changes in people’s expectations about their relationships with governments, their role and their ability to deliver public value - and this calls governments to re-examine their governance approaches and strategies[[OECD Recommendation of the Council on Digital Government Strategies, 2014]]. It requires understanding the legal, political and cultural aspects of this transformation and prepare for the necessary organisational, administrative, technical human resource and legal changes to link departments internally together, but also to effectively engage with users, citizens, businesses, social partners, civil society organisations, non-profit organisations, social enterprises, communities and all those who want to interact. It raises questions about how governments can organise themselves around user expectations, needs and associated requirements, rather than their own internal logic and needs. How can they create an open environment and ecosystem, where public administrations make tools supported by ICT, assets, data, information and resources available for re-use, invite all actors to collaborate within clear frameworks? How can governments still they remain accountable for public value generation? How can co-creation and collaboration transform the way public and collective issues are explored and how services and policies are designed, produced and delivered? Which role can professional communicators, e.g. journalists, play in this process? What is the impact of different country contexts? What sectors of public policy are potentially the most concerned by this transformation? What new rules and standards, organisations, resource allocation, institutional capacities are needed? Measured impacts, recommendations and lessons can inform policy-makers' judgement on whether and how they would be able to embark on the transformation towards the open and collaborative government 'environment'. What are the underlying conditions, enablers, risks and barriers?

Through understanding the future role of government and the public sector in Europe, we can enhance European cohesion, well-being, welfare and unity, while challenging the narratives of voices which question the relevance of European values. In order to contribute to individual and societal development, we need to consider how to embrace the positive potential of digital technologies to strengthen the cohesion of European society, through shared values and to facilitate active participation in the democratic system.

Scope:

a) Research and Innovation Actions

(2016/2017) Research is needed to explore and analyse how the public administrations can become open and collaborative, encouraging the engagement and participation of public, private and civil society stakeholders - such as for example other public authorities, users, citizens, businesses, researchers, civil society organisations, social innovators, social entrepreneurs, media actors, artists and designers - for effective, appropriate and user-friendly public service design, delivery and policy-making.

The research proposals should present evidence of previous experience in creating environments fostering co-creation through engaging different societal actors in addressing research and impact goals (scientific, political and social) and their planned research should go beyond the existing theories and empirical evidence. The actions need to engage multi-disciplinary and multi-sectoral teams to explore the complexity of public services, enablers for public administrations, identify the necessary changes, risks and barriers to implementation, assess the potential of different policy domains and explore feasibility in different public administration contexts (across a representative set of Member States and different levels of governments). The actions need to provide a set of concrete recommendations for policy-makers at local, regional and national level. The actions need to address the transferability and sustainability of their results.

Proposals need to address several of the below aspects:

  • Exploring what the role of governments in an open and collaborative government setting may be and how this could be embedded in an EU setting (taking into account shared European values, diversity as well as principles of subsidiarity);
  • Developing methods and approaches to understanding community assets, needs and requirements in order to provide meaningful public services;
  • Understanding the demographics, appropriateness of participatory practices and their feasibility for scaling up, so as to generate civic participation on all levels, ensure level playing field in public engagement and legitimacy of the process;
  • Analysing the necessary cultural attitudes, roles, skills, expertise, knowledge as well as incentives and drivers (such as for example possibilities for wellbeing, healthy life, employment, democracy issue, etc.) of those involved in this process (including civil servants, service providers and users);
  • Exploring how innovative processes and mechanisms (e.g. through scalable open platforms or open architectures, etc.) can be embedded in public administrations to create an open digital government environment and ecosystem for improving service delivery and citizen engagement;
  • Analysing the conditions under which user-knowledge input is fully integrated in the services/policy development/design process;
  • Analysing what co-creation in the public sector can learn from the private sector in terms of critical drivers and enabling factors;
  • Exploring the suitability of different institutional frameworks for collaboration both within the public sector and with external actors that allow sharing data, information and services internally between departments and with external parties for re-use;
  • Exploring the suitability of innovative technologies that facilitate for example co-creation, sharing relevant information between stakeholders, address issues of privacy, data protection and security or improve communication;
  • Analysing the drivers and enabling factors for societal actors to engage in public service or policy co-creation and identifying different sustainability models (such as for example Public Private Partnerships, government spin-offs, hybrid government teams, etc.);
  • Exploring, monitoring and measurement approaches, methods and tools to understand the impact of open, innovative and collaborative government for public administrations, for growth and societal well-being and for substantiating the link between innovative public sector service and public sector efficiency.

Actions may want to strengthen their recommendations for prioritisation of reform steps to be taken by relying on insights through perception data with respect to the public sector in general or the public administration in particular (e.g. bottlenecks perceived by both the citizens and businesses in dealing with the public sector, etc.) It is essential that users are a fundamental part of any proposed project and proposals may want to validate the prototype developed in any of the above.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 4 and 5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. This does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

b) Coordination and Support Action[[This activity is directly aimed at supporting the development and implementation of evidence base for R&I policies and supporting various groups of stakeholders. It is excluded from the delegation to Research Executive Agency and will be implemented by the Commission services.]]

(2016) The aim is to bring together actors inside and outside public administrations, including policy makers, politicians, civil society organisations, users, businesses, researchers, social innovators, social entrepreneurs, initiatives, good practices both in the EU and internationally to identify good practice cases, discuss and exchange on the transformation of public administrations in Europe and discuss the future role of government in this context. Proposals will need to develop a strategic stakeholder engagement plan and a roadmap for future research directions.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU in the order of EUR 0.5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. This does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

The actions will form the basis for new institutional strategies and mechanisms to enhance collaboration among government departments and with other actors to collaboratively design, produce and deliver public services and policies. The findings will help public administrations at all levels to rethink their roles in the European society. Results will give guidance to governments and policy makers on how to transform public administrations to become open, innovative and collaborative. The policy recommendations will provide guidance on the cultural, legal or procedural changes needed to facilitate the direct uptake of research and other insights by stakeholders. The actions will also improve the understanding of the effectiveness of related public policies in different democratic models. Taking up the policy recommendations will ultimately lead to improved public service delivery and policy effectiveness, higher quality services, improved societal evidence, improved user experiences and inclusiveness as well as increasing level of civic participation, transparency, trust, social inclusion, accountability of institutions and good governance.

REV-INEQUAL-09-2017Boosting inclusiveness of ICT-enabled research and innovationd.l. 02-02-2017
Call REV-INEQUAL-2017 (subcall de: H2020-SC6-REV-INEQUAL-2016-2017)
Orçamento 9,50 M€
Specific Challenge:

The deployment of information and communication technologies induces changes that impact individuals, societies and the environment in profound and pervasive ways. Harnessing the expertise of social sciences and humanities (SSH) in ICT-related research and innovation is key to contribute, notably, to cohesion, fairness, and inclusiveness. Although the need for a constructive, reflective and critical interactions between social sciences and humanities, on the one hand, and technological disciplines, on the other hand, is widely acknowledged, it is a challenge to make it happen and ensure that insights and innovation stemming from both perspectives join up in order to deliver inclusive ICT-enabled innovation. It calls for a smart approach to multiple disciplinarity[[http://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/en/news/how-carry-out-multiple-disciplinary-research-effectively]] that combines different tools and relies on the dynamic uptake of social sciences and humanities' perspectives. With this in mind, a structured distributed approach to the mainstreaming of social sciences and humanities across all topics aiming at ICT-related research and innovation has been set up. This approach strives to nurture a horizontal and mutually enriching relationship between SSH and ICT communities. For responsible and inclusive innovation to come true, one has to move beyond a reactive and risk-based approach, and encourage ongoing critical accompaniment of this innovation, rather than seeking mere acceptance of technological artefacts. This expands the remit of what is expected from SSH expertise. Instead of being confined in a "watchdog" or an "airbag" role for S&T developments, SSH is itself a source of innovation[[https://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/en/responsible-research-and-innovation-horizon-2020]].

Scope:

This topic calls for the coordination and support action that will bring life to the distributed and structured approach designed to ensure a responsible approach to research and innovation thought the uptake of SSH expertise across all H2020 areas leading to ICT-related innovation. It should act as a "hub" and activate the constructive interactions of SSH research with the ICT-related projects across H2020.

The purpose of the hub is to stimulate responsible and inclusive ICT research and innovation by encouraging the uptake of the SSH expertise in ICT-related projects and by coordinating and supporting the embedded expertise within the H2020-funded ICT-related projects, as well as linking these H-2020 projects with the relevant SSH expertise and initiatives both in Europe and in the world, to ensure that this important knowledge basis is fed into the H2020-funded ICT related research and innovation. The coordination and support action is expected to generate in a collaborative way a shared understanding what it takes for ICT research and innovation to be responsible and inclusive, and to make it happen.

In terms of coordination efforts, the hub is expected to ensure an active dialogue and the sharing of experience among ICT developers, SSH researchers and other stakeholders (NGOs, citizens and users e.g.) across H2020 ICT-related projects[[A particular attention will be paid to ensuring synergies with the projects flowing from the ICT-LEIT topic "ICT35-2016: Enabling responsible ICT-related innovation"]]. It is also expected to channel the fruits of this dialogue into discussions with policymakers, into the shaping of future research agendas, and into a reflexive assessment of the SSH research practice in the remit of the digital transition.

In terms of its supporting function, the hub will catalyse information sharing about activities in Europe that are enhancing responsible and inclusive approaches to ICT-related research and innovation. Drawing on ongoing developments, it will provide tools and advice for fostering responsibility and inclusiveness of ICT research and innovation. It will support the visibility of the relevant activities through sustained communication efforts (annual conferences, awareness raising, interactive web-based platform e.g.). It will encourage debates on the challenges raised by hyper connectivity and support experimental activities in interactive labs to stimulate reflection on cutting-edge issues.

The Commission will select one proposal only and considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of EUR 3 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. This does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:
  • Improved level and efficacy of the interaction between SSH and ICT disciplines with a view to harnessing ICT-related innovation for reversing inequalities and contributing to responsible and inclusive innovation processes through SSH expertise;
  • Improved take-up of societal concerns in ICT-related research and innovation;
  • Increased worldwide visibility and influence of a European community with a shared vision for inclusive ICT research and innovation;
  • The proposals themselves are expected to identify key measurable success indicators –to be further framed in the course of the project- that measure impact in community building and engagement, and uptake of inclusive responsible ICT research and innovation approaches within and beyond the consortium.
Delegation Exception Footnote:

This activity directly aimed at supporting the development and implementation of evidence base for R&I policies and supporting various groups of stakeholders. It is excluded from the delegation to Research Executive Agency and will be implemented by the Commission services.

Type of Action: Coordination and support action

   

ICT    <<    Segurança
DS-06-2017Cybersecurity PPP: Cryptographyd.l. 25-04-2017
Call H2020-DS-2017-1 (subcall de: H2020-DS-2016-2017)
DIGITAL SECURITY FOCUS AREA
Orçamento 20,50 M€

Cybersecurity PPP

Specific Challenge:

In line with technological developments and emerging threats, the improvement of performance and efficiency of cryptographic solutions is a persistent need across ICT.

Scope:

Proposals may address one or more of the areas/challenges described below but not necessarily all of them:

- Functional encryption solutions that offer more flexibility and make it feasible to process encrypted data held on the Internet. Research should aim for solutions beyond the current only partial homomorphic encryption algorithms under development.

Activities should also deal with measurement of information leaked when allowing for flexibility and preserving data formats. Additionally, means to reduce this leakage (e.g., anonymization or obfuscation) should be researched.

- For application areas such as the Internet of Things, implantable medical devices and sensor nodes that harvest energy from the environment there is a need for ultra-lightweight cryptology. Additional means to protect privacy in these applications (e.g. anonymity in communications) should be developed.

Even if Moore’s law would hold for the next 10-15 years, the progress in bandwidth and storage capacity grows faster than the computing power; and so this means that there is a need for ultra-high-speed cryptographic algorithms that are fully parallelizable and energy efficient as well as high speed encryption applied directly to the physical layer, for example using quantum cryptography. This challenge is related to the challenge of ultra-lightweight cryptology but the optimization target is very different and hence completely different designs are expected.

- Implementation (hardware or software) is often the weak point of the strongest cryptographic protocols: physical cryptanalysis, including tampering, side channel, faults injection attacks, has to be taken into account in the early phases of a development. A specific attention should be paid to the security of the implementation and its validation.

While development tools today include support for good software practices that avoid many common implementation errors, these tools insufficiently support good practices that can bring cyber-secure primitives and applications. Therefore, more progress is needed in the development of toolkits that integrate encryption seamless in their toolbox environment.

- Authenticated encrypted token research for mobile payment solutions and related applications. Most currently existing payment solutions emulate a credit or debit card payment scheme. Tokenized payment solutions can effectively reduce the risk of cyber-fraud and open options for alternative payment options to European citizens. The proposals should aim to create a real e-currency without compromising security or opening doors for criminals. Different projects may be envisaged, such as an e-€ wallet that can be held on a mobile and used to pay anywhere anytime combining convenience, flexibility and security without compromising the instrument with (inflated) transaction costs or possible criminal misuses.

- Innovative cryptographic primitives and complementary non-cryptographic privacy-preserving mechanisms to enforce privacy at various levels (e.g. pairing based cryptography).

- New techniques, such as quantum safe cryptography, which are secure from quantum computers and other advances in computing and cryptanalysis.

- Proposals on quantum key distribution addressing challenges such as improved performance (higher bit rates, increased loss and noise resilience), network integration (coexistence on existing infrastructure) and the development of new protocols beyond key distribution. Proposals on quantum key distribution should include experimentation and validation with end-users in realistic and relevant scenarios such as for mobile communication backhauling, optical access networks or data-centre to data-centre communication.

- Automated proof techniques for cryptographic protocols.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 3 million and EUR 5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

The outcome of the proposals are expected to lead to development up to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 3 to 5; please see part G of the General Annexes.

Expected Impact:
  • Increase the trustworthiness of European ICT services and products and the competitiveness of the European cryptography and smart card industry.
  • Increased trust in ICT and online services.
  • Protecting the European Fundamental Rights of Privacy and Data Protection.
  • Communication networks with automatic interference detection.
  • Improvement in performance and efficiency of cryptography beyond the state of the art.
  • Protection against emerging threats such as quantum computation.
DS-07-2017Cybersecurity PPP: Addressing Advanced Cyber Security Threats and Threat Actorsd.l. 24-08-2017
Call H2020-DS-2017-2 (subcall de: H2020-DS-2016-2017)
DIGITAL SECURITY FOCUS AREA
Orçamento 35,60 M€

Cybersecurity PPP

Specific Challenge:

Over the past decade, we have seen that cyber attacks have become increasingly sophisticated, stealthy, targeted and multi-faceted which may leverage zero-day exploits and highly creative interdisciplinary attack methods.

Detecting and responding to such attacks by a highly motivated, skilled and well-funded attacker has however been proven highly challenging.

As our society is becoming increasingly dependent on (critical) cyber infrastructure, new technologies are needed to increase our detection and response capabilities.

Scope:
  1. Research and Innovation Actions –Situational Awareness

The focus of the proposals should be on the development of novel approaches for providing organisations the appropriate situational awareness in relation to cyber security threats allowing them to detect and quickly and effectively respond to sophisticated cyber-attacks.

The solution may leverage techniques such as anomaly detection, visualisation tools, big data analysis, threat analysis, deep-packet inspection, protocol analysis, etc as well as interdisciplinary research to counter threat actors and their methods.

The proposals should also consider the need to collect necessary forensic information from attackers that can be used as evidence in court.

Proposals should assess and address the the impact to fundamental rights, data protection and privacy in particular, in the design and developmentof their solutions.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 2 and 3 million would allow these areas to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

The outcome of the proposals are expected to lead to development up to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 3 to 5; please see part G of the General Annexes.

  1. Innovation Actions – Simulation Environments, Training

Proposals should develop innovative simulation environments and training materials in order to adequately prepare those tasked with defending high-risk organisations to counter advanced cyber-attacks.

The simulation environments should take into consideration the following challenges:

  • Tools for creating realistic cyber environments that fit the training objectives and tools for producing both benign and malicious system events that fit the training scenario;
  • Real-time student performance assessment, dynamic configuration and adaptation of exercise scope and difficulty;
  • Exercise monitoring and evaluation of its state, being able to control the progress of the exercise, detect inconsistencies and hard-to-solve situations, etc;
  • Definition and creation of new scenarios and cyber threats in a cost and time-effective manner, and that better achieve the pedagogical objectives for a wide variety of student profiles;

In the context of cyber security attacks, proposals may also consider scenario building and simulation training to prepare organisations' response and decision making processes in relation obligations stemming from applicable legal frameworks or in the wider context of managing crises and emergency situations.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 4 and 5 million would allow these areas to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

The outcome of the proposals are expected to lead to development up to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6 to 7; please see part G of the General Annexes

Proposals have to address the specific needs of the end-user, private and public security end users alike. Proposals are encouraged to include public security end-users and/or private end users.

Expected Impact:
  • Improved detection and response time to advanced cyber security threats.
  • Increase society's resilience to advanced cyber security threats.
  • (RIA) Progress in technologies and processes needed to improve organisations' capabilities to detect and respond to advanced attacks.
  • (IA) Improvements in the preparadness of those charged with defending ICT systems from advanced threats in high risk scenarios.
DS-08-2017Cybersecurity PPP: Privacy, Data Protection, Digital Identitiesd.l. 24-08-2017
Call H2020-DS-2017-2 (subcall de: H2020-DS-2016-2017)
DIGITAL SECURITY FOCUS AREA
Orçamento 35,60 M€

Cybersecurity PPP

Specific Challenge:

The use of modern telecommunications and on-line services involve users' personal information.. For example, using search engines exposes the query terms used, which can be both sensitive and identifying, as illustrated by the exposure of search terms; social networking services expect users to reveal their social connections, messages and preferences, that could lead to direct privacy violation if exposed. Browsing the web also leaves traces of where users have gone, their interests, and their actions - meta-data that can be used to profile individuals.

The implementation the draft General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR - currently in the law-making process) presents both technological as well as organisational challenges for organisations which have to implement novelties such as the right to data portability, the right to be forgotten, data protection impact assessments and the various implementations of the principle of accountability.

Many services on the Internet depend on the availability of secure digital identities which play a crucial role in safeguarding the data and privacy of citizens as well as protecting them and other actors such as private companies or public services form various online threats. At the same time, many European countries already have or are in the process of developing an electronic identity (eID) scheme. Most of these projects are built to be at a very high security level, which makes them very suitable for diverse eGovernment processes. But in turn they may lack usability for commercial applications.

Scope:

Innovation Actions: Proposals may cover one of the strands identified below.

Privacy-enhancing Technologies (PET)

Novel designs and tools to provide users with the functionality they require without exposing any more information than necessary, and without losing control over their data, to any third parties. PET should be available in a broad spectrum of products and services, with usable, friendly and accessible safeguards options. PET should be developed having also cost effective solutions.

Comprehensive and consistent Privacy Risks Management Framework should be available, in order to allow people to understand their privacy exposure (i.e. helping people to understand what happens to their data when they go online, use social networks etc).

Open source and externally auditable solutions are encouraged in order to maximise uptake and increase the trustworthiness of proposed solutions.

General Data Protection Regulation in practice

Tools and methods to assist organisations to implement the GDPR taking into account the final provisions of GDPR and guidance from relevant authorities (Data Protection Authorities, Art 29 WP or its successor).

Proposals may also addrees the need to provide support (procedures, tools) for entities to understand how to operate without requiring unnecessary information (so as to promote privacy respecting practices), in particular when the issue is mainly related to the fact that organizations (businesses, service providers, and government agencies) often require too much information from their target customer/user.

Secure digital identities

With a view to reducing identity fraud while protecting the privacy of citizens, proposals should develop innovative, secure and privacy enhancing digital identity platforms beyond national eID systems.

Activities may leverage existing European electronic identification and authentication platforms with clearly defined interfaces based on the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Proposals may:

  • Leverage evidence-based identities (using adequate correlation of multiple soft proofs of identity, as opposed to the usage of a central register);
  • Provide a function for so called “qualified anonymity”, which means, that the online service does not have any information about the user but a pseudonym. The real identity of the user can only be revealed under specific conditions such as at the request of legal authorities;
  • Consider cost-effective and user-friendly verification methods for mobile identity documents.

For all strands, proposals should identify and address the societal and ethical dimensions of the strand they choose to cover taking into consideration the possibly divergent perspectives of pertinent stakeholders.

Proposals have to address the specific needs of the end-user, private and public security end users alike. Proposals are encouraged to include public security end-users and/or private end users.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 2 and 3 million would allow these areas to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

The outcome of the proposals are expected to lead to development up to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6 to 7; please see part G of the General Annexes.

Expected Impact:
  • Support for Fundamental Rights in Digital Society.
  • Increased Trust and Confidence in the Digital Single Market
  • Increase in the use of privacy-by-design prionciples in ICT systems and services
SEC-13-BES-2017Next generation of information systems to support EU external policiesd.l. 24-08-2017
Call H2020-SEC-2017 (subcall de: H2020-SEC-2016-2017)
SECURITY
Orçamento 130,05 M€

BORDER SECURITY AND EXTERNAL SECURITY

Specific Challenge:

The broad range and the complexity of Common Security and Defence Policy civilians' missions make the management of information and of resources critical to decision-making, planning, optimizing for pre-deployment, and deploying capabilities within such missions, and essential to increase the efficiency, visibility and impact of the missions.

The processes, procedures, information systems, and equipment currently committed to such missions by the Member States need to be brought together and coordinated to constitute a common interoperable platform to enhance the EU capacity to play its role.

Scope:

This topic is to support the development of a cost-effective common Situational Awareness, Information Exchange and Operation Control Platform.

Cost-effectiveness, and shorter time to implement may result from adapting and exploiting existing approaches and experience in the defence sector, and leveraging from results from relevant projects formerly funded by the EU.

Taking into consideration the findings of the CSA under topic "BES-11-2015: Information management topic 2: Information management, systems and infrastructure for civilian EU External Actions" of the 2014-2015 Secure Societies Work Programme, activities must be structured along the following phases:

Phase 1: Plan the research and the design of the platform, based on common performance levels, requirements and associated specifications for the development of a cost-effective common situational awareness, information exchange and operation control platform for EU civilian external actions developed in BES-11-2015, to be published prior to the opening of the Call in the section "Topic Conditions & Documents" for this topic on the Participant Portal"

Plans must consider integrating existing technologies, data models and methodologies (including pooling and sharing of capabilities) according to design constraints expressed by the buyers, to ensure cost effectiveness and interoperability.

The results of phase 1 should lead to calls for tenders (for the procurement of R&D services) which focus on technologies clearly identified to be part of a unique architecture.

Phase 2: The research and specification work should lead to at least 2 versions of flexible platforms to support, each, several scenarios for EU actions under different framework conditions.

Phase 3: By the end of 2020, the project should have documented, tested, and validated the use of each platform in at least two operational scenarios within actual multinational operations. The participation of relevant and competent authorities in the consortium of buyers is a prerequisite.

Whereas activities will have an exclusive focus on civil applications, coordination with the activities of the European Defence Agency (EDA) may be considered with possible synergies being established with projects funded by the EDA programmes. The complementarity of such synergies should be described comprehensively. On-going cooperation should be taken into account.

For grants awarded under this topic SEC-13–BES–2017, beneficiaries will be subject to the following additional obligations aiming to ensure exploitation of its results:

To ensure that the outcome of the PCP action becomes also available to EU Member State national authorities as well as EU agencies not participating in the PCP for further procurement purposes, the proposal must necessarily state:

(1). Agreement from participating procurement authorities to negotiate, in good faith and on a case-by-case basis, with non-participating procurement authorities that wish to procure a capability or a product fully or partly derived from the PCP action, the use of the information required to run such a procurement process, and solely for that purpose.

(2). Commitment from participating procurement authorities to consult with any legal entity generating information to be released for the purpose set out in paragraph (1), unless contrary to applicable legislation.

(3). Commitment from participating procurement authorities to negotiate the use granted under paragraph (1) on Fair Reasonable and Non-Discriminatory (FRAND) terms.

The respective option on additional exploitation obligations of Article 28.1 of the Model Grant Agreement will be applied.

The outcome of the proposal is expected to lead to development up to Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 8; please see part G of the General Annexes.

Indicative budget: The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of € 10million would allow for this topic to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Short term:

  • At least two prototype platforms deployed and tested in several, different real-life environments.

Medium term:

  • Better integration of existing systems and methodologies in situational awareness, information exchange and operation control platform prototypes.
  • Solid basis for a full-scale, cost-effective common situational awareness, information exchange and operation control platform for EU civilian external actions.

Long term:

  • Improved management of EU resources' allocated to EU civilian external actions.

   

Espaço    <<    FET
FETOPEN-01-2016-2017FET-Open research and innovation actionsd.l. 27-09-2017
Call FETOPEN-01-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETOPEN-2016-2017)
FET-Open research and innovation actions
Orçamento 110,50 M€
Specific Challenge: The successful exploration of new foundations for radically new future technologies requires supporting a large set of early stage, high risk visionary science and technology projects to investigate new ideas. Here agile, risk-friendly and highly interdisciplinary research approaches are needed with collaborations that are open to all sciences and disciplines and that dissolve the traditional boundaries between them. The renewal of ideas is complemented by the renewal of actors taking these new ideas forward. Therefore, this topic encourages the driving role of new high-potential actors in research and innovation, such as excellent young, both female and male, researchers and high-tech SMEs that may become the scientific and industrial leaders of the future.

Scope: This topic supports the early stages of research to establish a new technological possibility. Proposals are sought for collaborative research with all of the following characteristics ('FET gatekeepers'):  
•    Long-term vision: the research proposed must address a new and radical long-term vision of a science- and technology-enabled future that is far beyond the state of the art and not currently foreseen by technology roadmaps.  
•    Breakthrough scientific and technological target: research must target a scientifically ambitious and technologically concrete breakthrough, argued to be a crucial step towards achieving the long-term vision. The plausibility of the proposed breakthrough(s) to be attained within the life-time of the project must be argued in the proposal.  
•    Novelty: the research proposed for achieving the breakthrough must be based on cutting-edge knowledge, new ideas and concepts, rather than in the mere application or incremental refinement of existing ones.  
•    Foundational: the breakthroughs that are envisaged must be foundational in the sense that, if achieved, they would establish an essential basis for a new kind of technology and its future uses, not currently anticipated.  
•    High-risk: the inherently high risk of the research proposed will be reflected in a flexible but effective methodology for exploring alternative directions and options, supported by open and agile research and innovation practices.  
•    Interdisciplinary: the proposed collaborations are expected to go beyond 'waterfall' configurations in multi-disciplinary science- and technology research. Instead they should seek new solutions through genuine exchanges, mutual learning, cross-fertilisation and synergistic advances among distant disciplines in order to open unexplored areas of investigation and new directions for joint research.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 3 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:   
•    Initiating or consolidating a baseline of feasibility for a radically new line of technology and its future uses by establishing the essential proofs-of-principle and their foundational scientific underpinnings.  
•    Strengthening European leadership in the early exploration of visionary, new and emerging technologies, beyond academic excellence and with global recognition. This impact can be reinforced by involving also new high-potential actors such as young, both female and male, researchers and high-tech SMEs that may become the European scientific and technological leaders and innovators of the future.  
•    Impact is also sought in terms of the take up of new research and innovation practices for making leading-edge science and technology research more open, collaborative, creative and closer to society.  

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action
FETOPEN-03-2017FET-Open Coordination and Support Actionsd.l. 20-03-2017
Call FETOPEN-03-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETOPEN-2016-2017)
FET-Open Coordination and Support Actions
Orçamento 1,50 M€
Specific Challenge:

The challenge is to make Europe the best place in the world for collaborative research and innovation on future and emerging technologies that will renew the basis for future European competitiveness and growth, and that will make a difference for society in the decades to come.

Scope:

Proposals should address one of the following topics:

  1. FET Futures [2017] [[This activity directly aimed at supporting the development and implementation of evidence base for R&I policies is excluded from the delegation to REA and will be implemented by the Commission services.]]: identifying strategy options, challenges and opportunities to stimulate and organise interdisciplinary research and innovation towards new and visionary technologies of any kind. Actions should rely on evidence from FET activities (e.g., portfolio, constituency, results) and from other sources (including other funding bodies or private initiatives worldwide, like those using prize schemes or challenges). They should aim at open and dynamic stakeholder participation using creative methods and on-line tools/social networks. This topic should include public engagement processes as discussed in the introduction of this FET Work Programme.
  2. FET Exchange [2017]: actions for structuring and strengthening an emerging FET-relevant science and technology research and innovation topic and the interdisciplinary communities involved in this topic. This may include, for example, research roadmapping, stimulating (formal and informal) learning and exchange, expanding the range of disciplines (including the life sciences and humanities where relevant), involving new actors such as young researchers, entrepreneurs and high-tech SMEs, and broadening stakeholder engagement (multi-actor or citizen).

For scope item a) at most one action will be funded.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 0.3 and 0.5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Strengthening globally recognised European leadership in the early exploration of visionary, new and emerging technologies, beyond academic excellence and with a strong engagement of scientists, citizens, innovators and policy makers.
Improved long-term innovation potential in Europe both from the abundance of novel ideas and the range of actors ready to take them forward.
Improved understanding of the range of possible impact mechanisms for long-term science and technology research.
Improved readiness across Europe to engage in silo-breaking research collaboration and to take up new research and innovation practices.

FETOPEN-04-2016-2017FET Innovation Launchpadd.l. 29-09-2016
Call FETOPEN-04-2016 (subcall de: H2020-FETOPEN-2016-2017)
FET Innovation Launchpad
Orçamento 1,20 M€
Specific Challenge:

FET projects often generate new and sometimes unexpected opportunities for commercial or societal application. This topic aims at funding further innovation related work (i.e. activities which were not scheduled to be funded by the original project) to verify and substantiate the innovation potential of ideas arising from FET funded projects and to support the next steps in turning them into a genuine social or economic innovation.

Scope:

Short and focused individual or collaborative actions to take out of the lab a promising result or proof-of-concept that originated from a FET-funded project and to get it on the way to social or economic innovation through new entrepreneurship or otherwise. The action will support the transformation of that specific research result into a credible offering for economic or social impact, by exploring the feasibility of an exploitation path and by coordinating and supporting the assembling of the right knowledge, skills and resources and thus serves as a launch pad for exploitation.

This call topic is focused on the early innovation stages from results of an ongoing or recently finished project[[For a project to be considered 'ongoing or recently finished' in the context of this call topic its end date must be at most one year before the deadline for proposal submission to this topic.]] funded through FET under FP7 or H2020. The complementarity and precise link with the relevant FET project is to be explicitly addressed in the proposal by clearly stating the nature and origin of the results to be taken up, and by adding a confirmation of any necessary agreements with owners or right holders of those results to move towards their exploitation. This call topic does not fund additional research, nor does it fund activities that are/were already foreseen in the relevant FET project. Activities to be funded should be fit-for-purpose (e.g., tailored to the level of maturity of the result to be taken up) and can include, among others, the definition of a commercialisation process to be followed, market and competitiveness analysis, technology assessment, consolidation of intellectual property rights and strategy, scenario and business case development, developing contacts and support relevant activities with for instance, industrial transfer partners, potential licence-takers, investors, societal organisations or potential end users.

By focusing on the very early stage of the innovation path, the scope of this call includes situations where an SME or other suitable entrepreneurial context may not yet exist.

The Commission considers that proposals for actions no longer than 18 months and requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 0.1 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals of different duration.

Expected Impact:
  • Increased innovation potential from FET projects by picking up expected as well as non-anticipated innovation opportunities.
  • Creation of concrete and closer-to-market high-potential innovations from FET projects.
  • Stimulating, supporting and rewarding an open and proactive mind-set towards exploitation beyond the European research world.
  • Seeding future growth and the creation of jobs from FET research.
FETPROACT-02-2017FET ERANET Cofundd.l. 24-01-2017
Call FETPROACT-02-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETPROACT-2016-2017)
FET ERANET Cofund
Orçamento 5,00 M€

FETHPC-02-2017: Transition to Exascale Computing

Specific Challenge:

Take advantage of the full capabilities of exascale computing, in particular through high-productivity programming environments, system software and management, exascale I/O and storage in the presence of multiple tiers of data storage, supercomputing for extreme data and emerging HPC use modes, mathematics and algorithms for extreme scale HPC systems for existing or visionary applications, including data-intensive and extreme data applications in scientific areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, life sciences, materials, climate, geosciences, etc.

Scope:

Proposals should address one or more of the following subtopics:

a) High productivity programming environments for exascale: Proposals should have as target to simplify application software development for large- and extreme-scale systems. This can include the development of more productive programming models and environments, the easier combination of different programming models, and using increased intelligence throughout the programming environment. Key aspects include managing data transfers, data locality and memory management, including support for heterogeneous and reconfigurable systems as well as dealing with inter-application dynamic load balancing and malleability, adapting to changes in the number of processors. Unified performance tools are required supporting HPC, embedded and extreme data workloads, on diverse target systems. APIs, runtime systems and the underlying libraries should support auto-tuning for performance and energy optimisation. Automated support for debugging and anomaly detection is also included under this subtopic. To provide simplified development and to ensure the maintainability of domain-specific languages (DSLs), DSL frameworks are required which target a general-purpose stable programming model and runtime. Since large future systems will require the use of multiple programming models or APIs, an important aspect is interoperability and standardisation of programming model, API and runtime as well as the composability of programming models (the capability of building new programming models out of existing programming model elements)

b) Exascale system software and management: Proposals should advance the state of the art in system software and management for node architectures that will be drastically more complex and their resource topology and heterogeneity will require OS and runtime enhancement, such as data aware scheduling. In the area of hardware abstraction, proposals should address run time handling of all types of resources (cores, bandwidth, logical and physical memory or storage) and controls, e.g. for optimised data coherency, consistency and data flow. For applications, proposals should address new multi-criteria resource allocation capabilities and interaction during task execution, with the aim to improve resilience, interactivity, power and efficiency. To cope with the exploding amount of data, the sequential analysis process (capture, store, analyse) is not sufficient; proposals should explore on-the-fly analysis methods offering reactivity, compute efficiency and availability. Graphical simulation interaction will require new real-time features; configuration and deployment tools will have to evolve to take into account the composability of software execution environments.

c) Exascale I/O and storage in the presence of multiple tiers of data storage: proposals should address exascale I/O systems expected to have multiple tiers of data storage technologies, including non-volatile memory. Fine grain data access prioritisation of processes and applications sharing data in these tiers is one of the goals as well as prioritisation applied to file/object creates/deletes. Runtime layers should combine data replication with data layout transformations relevant for HPC, in order to meet the needs for improved performance and resiliency. It is also desirable for the I/O subsystem to adaptively provide optimal performance or reliability especially in the presence of millions of processes simultaneously doing I/O. It is critical that programming system interoperability and standardised APIs are achieved. On the fly data management supporting data processing, taking into account multi-tiered storage and involving real time in situ/in transit processing should be addressed.

d) Supercomputing for Extreme Data and emerging HPC use modes: HPC architectures for real-time and in-situ data analytics are required to support the processing of large-scale and high velocity real-time data (e.g. sensor data, Internet of Things) together with large volumes of stored data (e.g. climate simulations, predictive models, etc.). The approaches should include support for real-time in-memory analysis of different data structures, direct processing of compressed data and appropriate benchmarking method for performance analysis. Interactive 3-D visualisation of large-scale data to allow users to explore large information spaces in 3-D and perform on-demand data analysis in real-time (e.g. large scale queries or analytics) should be addressed. Interactive supercomputing is required to execute complex workflows for urgent decision making in the field of critical clinical diagnostics, natural risks or spread of diseases; this implies adapting operational procedures of HPC infrastructures, developing efficient co-scheduling techniques or improving checkpoint/restart and extreme data management

e) Mathematics and algorithms for extreme scale HPC systems and applications working with extreme data: Specific issues are quantification of uncertainties and noise, multi-scale, multi-physics and extreme data. Mathematical methods, numerical analysis, algorithms and software engineering for extreme parallelism should be addressed. Novel and disruptive algorithmic strategies should be explored to minimize data movement as well as the number of communication and synchronization instances in extreme computing. Parallel-in-time methods may be investigated to boost parallelism of simulation codes across a wide range of application domains. Taking into account data-related uncertainties is essential for the acceptance of numerical simulation in decision making; a unified European VVUQ (Verification Validation and Uncertainty Quantification) package for Exascale computing should be provided by improving methodologies and solving problems limiting usability for very large computations on many-core configurations; access to the VVUQ techniques for the HPC community should be facilitated by providing software that is ready for deployment on supercomputers.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 2 and 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. Proposals should clearly indicate the subtopic which is their main focus. At least one project per subtopic will be funded.

Expected Impact:

  • Contribution to the realisation of the ETP4HPC Strategic Research Agenda, thus strengthened European research and industrial leadership in HPC technologies.
  • Successful transition to practical exascale computing for the addressed specific element of the HPC stack.
  • Covering important segments of the broader and/or emerging HPC markets, especially extreme-computing, emerging use modes and extreme-data HPC systems.
  • Impact on standards bodies and other relevant international research programmes and frameworks.
  • European excellence in mathematics and algorithms for extreme parallelism and extreme data applications to boost research and innovation in scientific areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, life sciences, materials, climate, geosciences, etc.

   

Espaço    <<    NMP+B
NMBP-04-2017Architectured /Advanced material concepts for intelligent bulk material structuresd.l. 27-10-2016
Call H2020-NMBP-2017-two-stage (subcall de: H2020-NMBP-2016-2017)
CALL FOR NANOTECHNOLOGIES, ADVANCED MATERIALS, BIOTECHNOLOGY AND PRODUCTION
Orçamento 187,47 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de Fecho 2ª Fase: 04-05-2017 (só propostas aprovadas na 1ª Fase podem concorrer à 2ª Fase)
Specific Challenge:

The development of smart materials has been gathering pace over the past few years to develop novel concepts for intelligent components and structures with integrated functionalities that are able to communicate and interact with their environment, store data about their condition and react accordingly to external stimuli. Research in the areas of biomimetic bio-inspired engineering and nanomaterials can provide several examples of the development of smart materials and has seen a significant expansion. Examples include materials that can alter their physical properties, (e.g. viscosity, shape, colour and more) in response to temperature, stress, electrical or magnetic fields, convert sunlight into electricity, store energy, etc. Smart materials have also been used extensively in sensor developments in aerospace and automotive applications with the aim of producing intelligent structures and components that provide information of their in-service conditions However, there are several concepts that have not yet been implemented in industrial scale. Such technologies include self-repair or self-healing materials, materials for vibration suppression, lightweight composites that can inform the user of any internal damage without the need of time consuming and expensive Non-destructive Examination (NDE), materials or structures that can undergo shape change either passively or by activation, Functionally Graded composite Materials (FGMs), energy storing components, etc. There is a need for predictive modelling of materials functionalities for those materials for which there are currently no accurate commercial or open-source codes available.

Scope:

Proposals are sought to address specific industrial needs and facilitate the implementation of smart materials for applications in transport, consumer goods and ICT. The potential extension of these applications to other industrial sectors such as e.g. oil & gas and petrochemicals will be an asset. The technical challenges to be addressed relate to the development, processing and integration of smart materials with new functionalities, as e.g. for: advanced sensors (nanosensor technologies), damage detection, self-repair, self-actuation, self-sensing morphing, magnetic functionality (for non-magnetic materials), optical functionality, sound and vibration damping, thermal management in ICT applications. Material concepts based on bio-inspired solutions can also be considered. Modelling of the properties of relevance to manufacturing should be considered and further developed. Although the materials most suited to such development are lightweight advanced composites from different material classes, (like multiferroics, polymeric, ceramic, glass or metal matrix composites, organic fibrous materials). It is expected that such smart materials may make use of the unique properties possessed by nanoparticles and therefore the development of nanomaterial based intelligent components will be within the scope of the call. The development of such material structures has to be accompanied by high resolution analytical tools that are able to simulate and characterise the materials on all scales and, moreover, to track and reveal their function –structure relations in situ. The functionalities of smart materials will require the identification of gaps in standards and future pre-normative activities will have to be addressed as part of the scope. For this topic proposals should also be able to demonstrate in addition to the development concept, the feasibility of such technologies in terms of cost, production and processing methodologies, reuse/recycling of materials at end of life and reliability. Industrial and/or additional experimental partners should ensure broad validation and adoption of both the software and the materials.

The implementation of this topic is intended to start at TRL 4 and target TRL 6.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 5 and 8 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

The implementation of novel smart material technologies is expected to pave the way for innovative environmentally friendly smart products:

  • Enhancing the market opportunities for European industries;
  • Improving consumer safety;
  • Reducing maintenance costs;
  • Improving resource efficiency;
  • Contributing to a future circular economy;
  • Improved understanding of materials properties based on theoretical materials models.

Enhancing the knowledge base in the EU not only at the R&D level but also at the manufacturing and production level, creating a highly skilled workforce with improved levels of job satisfaction.

Proposals should include a business case and exploitation strategy, as outlined in the Introduction to the LEIT part of this Work Programme.

   

Espaço    <<    Bio Economia
SFS-43-2017Earth observation services for the monitoring of agricultural production in Africad.l. 14-02-2017
Call H2020-SFS-2017-1 (subcall de: H2020-SFS-2016-2017)
SUSTAINABLE FOOD SECURITY – RESILIENT AND RESOURCE-EFFICIENT VALUE CHAINS
Orçamento 85,00 M€

Specific ChallengeThe Fourth EU-Africa Summit of 2-3 April 2014 agreed on a roadmap for 2014-2017[[http://www.africa-eu-partnership.org/sites/default/files/documents/]] including actions specifically targeted at delivering Earth observation services in priority domains for Africa such as food security. This topic aims to contribute to this roadmap by providing food supply projection and agricultural risk assessment for Africa. These kinds of projection remain very challenging tasks, requiring a lot of information on environmental and weather conditions, climate change, crops and livestock. This information is usually derived from both remote and in-situ Earth observation systems. The challenge is therefore to make agricultural production in Africa more predictable by using Earth observation assets, including – but not limited to – those made available through the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) and Copernicus programmes.

ScopeThe action should lead to substantially increasing the use of Earth observing capabilities and supporting application systems to produce timely, objective, reliable, and transparent crop and livestock production projection at the national and regional level for the African continent. It should support the GEOGLAM[[http://www.geoglam-crop-monitor.org/]] and AfriGEOSS[[http://www.earthobservations.org/afrigeoss.php]] initiatives and relevant aspects of the EU's development policy. Moreover, it should design and develop methods to assess/monitor agricultural production in Africa, taking into account its main drivers and the longer term impacts of its dynamics. Building on the outcomes of existing EU projects stimulating innovation for global agricultural monitoring – such as SIGMA[[http://www.geoglam-sigma.info/]] –, the research and innovation activities should cover as a minimum all the following domains: crop and livestock identification and crop and livestock area estimation, crop and livestock condition and stress, yield prediction and forecasting, crop cover mapping, and the impact of extreme events on food production.

The action should foster participatory approaches to collecting relevant information and data, taking advantage of the growing number of mobile communication devices owned by African citizens. The participatory approaches should also take into account, and build on, widespread women’s engagement in agricultural production and food supply. There should be an emphasis on ‘consensus of evidence approaches’, integrating data from multiple sources including Earth observations, crop models, weather forecast, climate predictions and projections, surveys and ground observations to reach evidence-based assessments using repeatable and scientifically sound methods.

Large proof-of-concept actions, showing the capacity to deliver food supply prediction and agriculture risk assessment beyond the current state-of-the art at regional/pan-African level should be performed by the action. Proposals should contribute to supporting the implementation of an EU-Africa partnership on Food and Nutrition Security and Sustainable Agriculture and should include partners clearly representing the diversity of African countries.

In line with the strategy for EU international cooperation in research and innovation (COM(2012)497), international cooperation is encouraged, in particular with African countries. The action should establish cooperation with institutions/networks engaged in the development of climate services in Africa and with agencies which have developed mapping and assessment tools used in humanitarian decision making.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 10 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude the submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected ImpactProposals are expected to:

• move projection of food supply and agricultural risk assessment at the level of the African continent beyond the current capability; 
• improve decision making capacity regarding food supply and management in Africa; 
• contribute to independent and neutral evaluation of agricultural production in Africa; 
• strengthen collaboration between EU and African organisations in the domain of food projection; 
• increased involvement of citizens and stakeholders in food production and food supply chain management in Africa, taking into account the gender dimension and women’s role in food production and supply; 
• provide a strong Earth observation building blocks for an EU-Africa Research and Innovation Partnership focusing on food and nutrition security and sustainable agriculture; 
• improve participation of African organisations in GEO and Copernicus (GMES & Africa initiative); 
• foster cooperation with initiatives developing the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) [www.gfcs-climate.org/] in African countries; 
• contribute to implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular SDG 2 'End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture' and SDG 13 'Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts'.

Type of action: Research and Innovation action

   

Espaço    <<    Ação Climática
SC5-02-2017Integrated European regional modelling and climate prediction systemd.l. 07-03-2017
Call H2020-SC5-2017-one-stage (subcall de: H2020-SC5-2016-2017)
Greening the Economy
Orçamento 92,10 M€
Specific Challenge: European decision makers and businesses currently lack access to a
consistent and authoritative Europe-wide set of climate simulations at appropriate spatial and
temporal scales upon which regional, national and local climate-related risk assessments and
climate change adaptation programmes and businesses could be built. There is high demand
for, and an urgent need to develop, integrated multi-model ensemble climate predictions at
European scale which can provide actionable climate information and assessments. This
integrated climate prediction system should go hand in hand with coordinated regional
modelling and observational studies to constitute a robust foundation for Europe-wide climate
service activities. It should be based on user requirements and provide trustworthy and easily
accessible climate information which can be utilised across Europe and beyond.

Scope: The main research objective of this action is to develop an innovative European
regional ensemble climate prediction system based on a new generation of high-resolution
climate models, covering timescales from seasons to decades initialised with observations.
The action should conduct a series of multi-method and multi-model experiments in order to
better capture uncertainties, and provide user-centred and demand-driven information which
addresses user needs at various levels.

The system should focus on near term (~1-40 years) predictions, which is the time span most
relevant for many decisions of businesses and public authorities for infrastructure and other
planning.

The regional downscaling programme, an integral part of the multi-model ensemble
prediction system, should target Europe at the best technically achievable spatial resolution.
Methodologies should be transferable to other geographical areas. Evaluation of model results
against observations is considered essential.

Climate model data should be widely disseminated, and therefore need to be easily accessible
and available in line with Copernicus Climate Change service specifications.
Strong engagement with stakeholders and climate information end-users, including public
sector policy-makers, business organisations and customers representing specific market
sectors is an essential requirement of this action.

In line with the strategy for EU international cooperation in research and innovation
(COM(2012)497), international cooperation is encouraged, in particular with countries having
developed similar systems and with countries wishing to develop capacities.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU in the order
of EUR 13 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately.
Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other
amounts. Up to one action shall be funded.

Expected Impact: The unique ensemble of climate predictions developed in this action should
become the reference climate information from regional to local scale across Europe to assess
the impacts and risks of climate variability and change as solid basis upon which investment
decisions, spatial planning, policy and adaptation options can be built. More specifically,
project results are expected to contribute to:

• increasing the credibility and usability of climate predictions, and the identification and
characterisation of trends in regional climate extremes;
• providing an authoritative foundation of climate information to assess the impact of
climate change;
• boosting climate service market applications at European level for a variety of sectors,
based on the new information;
• supporting the building of a climate resilient economy and strengthening civil protection;
• closing the gap between 'top-down' climate information provisions and 'bottom-up' enduser
requirements;
• implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular SDG 13 'Take
urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts', as well as the conclusions of the
COP21 Paris Agreement.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action
SC5-04-2017Towards a robust and comprehensive greenhouse gas verification systemd.l. 07-03-2017
Call H2020-SC5-2017-one-stage (subcall de: H2020-SC5-2016-2017)
Greening the Economy
Orçamento 92,10 M€
Specific Challenge: According the IPCC's 5th Assessment Report, atmospheric concentrations
of CO2, CH4 and N2O have increased to levels unprecedented in at least the last 800 000 years.
CO2 alone has increased by 40% since pre-industrial times, primarily from fossil fuel
emissions and also from net land use change emissions. Trust in any international agreement
under UNFCCC aimed at limiting global warming will depend on our ability to make accurate
estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as well as provision of mitigation services
allowing robust reporting and verification against independent data and analyses.
However, a better understanding of the carbon and nitrogen cycle in the earth-climate system
remains one of the key knowledge gaps. It is therefore essential that we increase our
capability to identify more accurately the stocks and fluxes of these important greenhouse
gases and at the same time develop methods and technologies that will enable us within the
next five to ten years to accurately estimate and also verify CO2, CH4 and N2O emissions from
key sources.

Scope: Actions should quantify more accurately the stocks and fluxes of CO2, CH4, and N2O
in Europe at both regional and continental scales through improved descriptions of key
processes and feedbacks, state-of-the art methodologies, models and tools and by exploiting
observations from a wide range of monitoring networks (in-situ and satellite). Special
attention should be given to independent verification of data reported in countries' greenhouse
gas inventories and to the improvement of the methods/approaches currently used for
estimating greenhouse gas emissions (e.g. national inventories, tracer transport inversion
using atmospheric and oceanic measurements, land-use measurements and models). Proposals
should aim to develop widely accepted and scientifically robust methodologies in order to
decrease to acceptable levels uncertainties associated with emission estimates and better
identify human-induced emissions. The development and improvement of methodologies
should also address the need for versatility of application, for example for the tracking of
land-based mitigation activities and provision of results relevant to current and potential
future land-based GHG accounting systems. Furthermore, issues such as data standards,
transfer of information and tools, and replicability of methodologies and tools outside Europe
(mainly in developing countries) should also be addressed.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU in the range
of EUR 10 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately.
Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other
amounts.

Expected Impact
: The project results are expected to contribute to:

. facilitating the development of an operationalised greenhouse gas monitoring, reporting
and independent verification system;
• improving the ability to monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions under an
international climate agreement by significantly decreasing current uncertainties
associated with greenhouse gas emission estimations;
• supporting EU climate policies by providing reliable information on greenhouse gases in
Europe over appropriate spatial and temporal scales;
• providing input (such as data, models, methods) to key international programs and
assessments (Global Carbon Project, IPCC, Future Earth);
• implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular SDG 13 'Take
urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts', as well as the conclusions of the
COP21 Paris Agreement.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action
SC5-13c-2017New solutions for sustainable production of raw materials - New sensitive exploration technologiesd.l. 07-03-2017
Call H2020-SC5-2017-one-stage (subcall de: H2020-SC5-2016-2017)
Greening the Economy
Orçamento 92,10 M€

Raw Materials

Specific Challenge: The EU is highly dependent on raw materials that are crucial for a strong
European industrial base, an essential building block of the EU's growth and competitiveness.
Securing the sustainable access to raw materials, including metals, industrial minerals and
construction raw materials, and particularly Critical Raw Materials (CRM), for the EU
economy is of high importance. However, the EU is confronted with a number of
technological challenges along the entire raw materials production value chain of primary and
secondary raw materials. There is also a need for clean and sustainable raw materials
production solutions to avoid environmental damage.

This specific challenge is identified in the Priority Area 'Technologies for primary and
secondary raw materials’ production of the European Innovation Partnership (EIP) on Raw
Materials.

Scope: All proposals should develop sustainable systemic solutions through industrially- and
user-driven multidisciplinary consortia covering the relevant value chain of non-energy non-agricultural
raw materials.

Assessment of the related environmental, social and safety risks and a plan to communicate
the added value of the proposal to the local communities and society for improving public
acceptance and trust should be addressed by all the proposals. Participation of civil society
from the start of exploration until after-mining activities in a process of co-design, codevelopment
and co-implementation is strongly encouraged.

Projects should include a work-package to cluster with other projects financed under this topic
and – if possible – with other relevant projects in the field funded by Horizon 2020, in support
of the EIP on Raw Materials.

In line with the EU's strategy for international co-operation in research and innovation
(COM(2012)497) international co-operation is encouraged.

Proposals should develop solutions validated in lab or in industrially relevant environment,
finishing at the level of Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) 4-5.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between
EUR 3 million and EUR 7 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed
appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals
requesting other amounts.

Proposals should develop new and more sensitive environmentally
sound exploration technologies and solutions (such as remote 
sensing technologies, innovative multi-method approaches to reprocess existing or new
geophysical data) able to identify targets for detailed exploration on the land with lower costs,
leading to finding new deposits and to re-assessing the mineral potential for the EU. Any of
the metallic, industrial and/or construction minerals could be targeted. The importance of the
targeted raw materials for the EU economy has to be duly demonstrated in the proposal.
Proposals should include the participation of technology oriented SMEs, as far as possible.
Sea exploration is not targeted by this call.

Expected Impact: Projects are expected to justify and provide evidence that they lead to:

achieving the objectives of the EIP on Raw Materials, particularly in terms of ensuring
the sustainable supply of raw materials to the EU and improving supply conditions
within the EU;
• pushing the EU to the forefront in the area of sustainable exploration technologies and
solutions through generated know how (planned patents, publications in high impact
journals and joint public-private publications etc.);
• increasing the reserves of various primary raw materials within the EU;
• reducing the exploration costs for the industry through new cost-effective exploration
technologies, while safe-guarding long- and short-term environmental stability;
• in longer term improving the competitiveness of and creating added value and new jobs
in raw materials producing, equipment manufacturing, information and communication
technologies and/or downstream industries;
• improving the awareness, acceptance and trust of society in a sustainable raw materials
production in the EU.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action
SC5-18-2017Novel in-situ observation systemsd.l. 07-03-2017
Call H2020-SC5-2017-one-stage (subcall de: H2020-SC5-2016-2017)
Greening the Economy
Orçamento 92,10 M€

Earth Observation

Specific Challenge: A more systematic observation of the Earth system is required at a
resolution and accuracy that cannot always be provided through remote sensing technologies.
There is therefore a need to extend and improve the in-situ component of the Global Earth
Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) and of the EU Copernicus programme in order to
collect the relevant data necessary to cover observation gaps, calibrate and validate remotesensing
data and deliver Earth Observation services, including monitoring variables, for
policy makers, local users and citizens.

However, components of existing in-situ observing and monitoring systems are too often
bulky, expensive and power hungry, which hinders their wide-scale deployment for
continuous environmental monitoring. The challenge here is to explore and test new
technological solutions that would lower the costs of acquiring, deploying and maintaining
monitoring and observing stations which would contribute to filling the in-situ observational
gaps of Earth observation systems. This issue is especially acute in less developed countries
where in-situ Earth observation capacities have deteriorated.

Scope: Actions should develop new, in-situ Earth observation systems, taking advantage of
new technology and the latest developments in sensor science so that measurements can be
performed using low energy sensors and communication systems, requiring less demanding
maintenance. Actions should focus on the transfer and adaptation of new technologies into
operational systems, enabling a real breakthrough in the efficiency of deploying and
maintaining new in-situ observing systems in a cost-effective way. The research and
innovation activities under this topic may take into account concepts such as citizens'
observatories, disposable sensors, and the use of unmanned platforms. The project should take
into account as much as possible relevant research outcomes from programmes of the
European Research Council, the Leadership in Enabling and Industrial Technologies and the
European Metrology Research Programme.

Prominent criteria for the selection of the projects will be fulfilling agreed European and
international standards regarding the quality of the measurements, and the interoperability for
data exchange with other existing monitoring and observing platforms and with user
applications. Proposals should establish formal links, where appropriate, with the GEO Global
Initiatives (e.g. GEOGLAM, GEOBON, GFOI, GMOS, AFRIGEOSS, BLUE PLANET) and
with the relevant Copernicus services so that the new monitoring and observing platforms
fulfil well-identified needs under these two major initiatives. Test phases enabling proof-ofconcept
of the observation and monitoring platforms in real conditions should be organised
during the course of the project. Participation of SMEs in project consortia is encouraged in
order to facilitate the development of innovative and operational systems.

Projects should foresee activities to cluster with other projects financed under this topic and –
if possible – also under other parts of Horizon 2020.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between
EUR 4 million and EUR 5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed
appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals
requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact: The project results are expected to contribute to:

• improved in-situ components of the GEOSS and Copernicus programmes;
• cost-effectiveness of the new systems when compared to previous ones;
• new opportunities and market development of the European Earth observation
commercial sector and for downstream users;
• measurable added value for the Copernicus and/or GEOSS initiatives;
• the provision of information necessary to ensure food, water and energy security, to cope
with the scarcity of natural resources, to develop mitigation and adaptation solutions to
climate change, and to make communities more resilient to natural hazards;
• implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular SDG 9 'Build
resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster
innovation'.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action
SC5-19-2017Coordination of citizens' observatories initiativesd.l. 07-03-2017
Call H2020-SC5-2017-one-stage (subcall de: H2020-SC5-2016-2017)
Greening the Economy
Orçamento 92,10 M€
Specific Challenge: Citizens' observatories55 are community-based environmental monitoring
and information systems which build on innovative and novel Earth observation applications
embedded in portable or mobile personal devices. Thanks to the vast array of ubiquitous
information and data they can provide, citizens' observatories can enable authorities to obtain
evidence and inform environmental policy making, complementing more authoritative in-situ
observation and monitoring networks and systems with a very positive cost-benefit ratio.

Citizens are also provided with new opportunities to address environmental issues affecting
them and to influence local decision making. Social innovation can be achieved through these
novel partnerships which involve the private and public sector, NGOs and citizens, offering
new business opportunities for SMEs in the fields of Earth observation and mobile
technologies.
These activities are, however, at an early stage and still largely rely on research funding.
Risks and opportunities still have to be explored, which requires a comprehensive analysis of
their full potential and applicability. There is a need to create a citizens' observatories
knowledge base in Europe across disciplines to avoid duplication, ensure interoperability,
create synergies and facilitate its gradual uptake by environmental authorities. With an
increasing number of citizen-based initiatives, a coordinated approach for the integration of
citizens' observations is becoming necessary in Earth observation systems at local, regional
and also global level.

Scope: This action should bring environmental citizens' observatories and related
communities together with existing relevant activities to benchmark and pinpoint best
practices, identify barriers and synergies, promote standards, facilitate integration and
stronger cooperation solutions, and stimulate a gradual uptake by public authorities of these
new technological and methodological approaches. Relevant issues such as technologies and
methodologies for engaging citizens, social innovation opportunities, sustainability
approaches including the role of the European private sector, especially SMEs, as well as data
management and interoperability of platforms should be addressed. A coherent approach
should also be taken to ensuring the delivery and uptake of in-situ data and information
coming from citizens observatories through GEOSS and Copernicus. Hence, proposals should
include a broad range of stakeholders, including public bodies, private sector representatives,
research institutions – including from social sciences and humanities – NGOs and citizens'
associations.

To address these points effectively, social science research tools and methods will be
required.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU in the range
of EUR 1 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately.
Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other
amounts. Up to one action shall be funded.

Expected Impact: The project results are expected to contribute to:
• improved coordination between existing environmental citizens' observatories and
related activities at regional, European and international level;
• expanded geographical coverage and use of environmental citizens' observation through
an effective promotion and uptake of best practices and standards;
• wider dissemination and uptake of efficient information and data management and
preservation strategies for existing and future citizens' observatory platforms;
• increased opportunities for SMEs and businesses in the field of in-situ Earth observation
systems;
• better awareness and use of the citizens' observatories by environmental and disaster risk
and emergency management decision makers;
• increased value added of GEOSS and Copernicus through the use of citizens'
observations;
• a leading role for Europe in the integration and uptake of citizens' information in
GEOSS;implementing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular SDG 9
'Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and
foster innovation'.

Type of Action: Coordination and support action

   

Saúde    <<    FET
FETHPC-02-2017Transition to Exascale Computingd.l. 26-09-2017
Call FETHPC-02-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETHPC-2016-2017)
Transition to Exascale Computing
Orçamento 40,00 M€

FETHPC-02-2017: Transition to Exascale Computing


Specific Challenge:

Take advantage of the full capabilities of exascale computing, in particular through high-productivity programming environments, system software and management, exascale I/O and storage in the presence of multiple tiers of data storage, supercomputing for extreme data and emerging HPC use modes, mathematics and algorithms for extreme scale HPC systems for existing or visionary applications, including data-intensive and extreme data applications in scientific areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, life sciences, materials, climate, geosciences, etc.


Scope:

Proposals should address one or more of the following subtopics:


a) High productivity programming environments for exascale: Proposals should have as target to simplify application software development for large- and extreme-scale systems. This can include the development of more productive programming models and environments, the easier combination of different programming models, and using increased intelligence throughout the programming environment. Key aspects include managing data transfers, data locality and memory management, including support for heterogeneous and reconfigurable systems as well as dealing with inter-application dynamic load balancing and malleability, adapting to changes in the number of processors. Unified performance tools are required supporting HPC, embedded and extreme data workloads, on diverse target systems. APIs, runtime systems and the underlying libraries should support auto-tuning for performance and energy optimisation. Automated support for debugging and anomaly detection is also included under this subtopic. To provide simplified development and to ensure the maintainability of domain-specific languages (DSLs), DSL frameworks are required which target a general-purpose stable programming model and runtime. Since large future systems will require the use of multiple programming models or APIs, an important aspect is interoperability and standardisation of programming model, API and runtime as well as the composability of programming models (the capability of building new programming models out of existing programming model elements)

b) Exascale system software and management: Proposals should advance the state of the art in system software and management for node architectures that will be drastically more complex and their resource topology and heterogeneity will require OS and runtime enhancement, such as data aware scheduling. In the area of hardware abstraction, proposals should address run time handling of all types of resources (cores, bandwidth, logical and physical memory or storage) and controls, e.g. for optimised data coherency, consistency and data flow. For applications, proposals should address new multi-criteria resource allocation capabilities and interaction during task execution, with the aim to improve resilience, interactivity, power and efficiency. To cope with the exploding amount of data, the sequential analysis process (capture, store, analyse) is not sufficient; proposals should explore on-the-fly analysis methods offering reactivity, compute efficiency and availability. Graphical simulation interaction will require new real-time features; configuration and deployment tools will have to evolve to take into account the composability of software execution environments.

c) Exascale I/O and storage in the presence of multiple tiers of data storage: proposals should address exascale I/O systems expected to have multiple tiers of data storage technologies, including non-volatile memory. Fine grain data access prioritisation of processes and applications sharing data in these tiers is one of the goals as well as prioritisation applied to file/object creates/deletes. Runtime layers should combine data replication with data layout transformations relevant for HPC, in order to meet the needs for improved performance and resiliency. It is also desirable for the I/O subsystem to adaptively provide optimal performance or reliability especially in the presence of millions of processes simultaneously doing I/O. It is critical that programming system interoperability and standardised APIs are achieved. On the fly data management supporting data processing, taking into account multi-tiered storage and involving real time in situ/in transit processing should be addressed.

d) Supercomputing for Extreme Data and emerging HPC use modes: HPC architectures for real-time and in-situ data analytics are required to support the processing of large-scale and high velocity real-time data (e.g. sensor data, Internet of Things) together with large volumes of stored data (e.g. climate simulations, predictive models, etc.). The approaches should include support for real-time in-memory analysis of different data structures, direct processing of compressed data and appropriate benchmarking method for performance analysis. Interactive 3-D visualisation of large-scale data to allow users to explore large information spaces in 3-D and perform on-demand data analysis in real-time (e.g. large scale queries or analytics) should be addressed. Interactive supercomputing is required to execute complex workflows for urgent decision making in the field of critical clinical diagnostics, natural risks or spread of diseases; this implies adapting operational procedures of HPC infrastructures, developing efficient co-scheduling techniques or improving checkpoint/restart and extreme data management

e) Mathematics and algorithms for extreme scale HPC systems and applications working with extreme data: Specific issues are quantification of uncertainties and noise, multi-scale, multi-physics and extreme data. Mathematical methods, numerical analysis, algorithms and software engineering for extreme parallelism should be addressed. Novel and disruptive algorithmic strategies should be explored to minimize data movement as well as the number of communication and synchronization instances in extreme computing. Parallel-in-time methods may be investigated to boost parallelism of simulation codes across a wide range of application domains. Taking into account data-related uncertainties is essential for the acceptance of numerical simulation in decision making; a unified European VVUQ (Verification Validation and Uncertainty Quantification) package for Exascale computing should be provided by improving methodologies and solving problems limiting usability for very large computations on many-core configurations; access to the VVUQ techniques for the HPC community should be facilitated by providing software that is ready for deployment on supercomputers.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 2 and 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. Proposals should clearly indicate the subtopic which is their main focus. At least one project per subtopic will be funded.


Expected Impact:

  • Contribution to the realisation of the ETP4HPC Strategic Research Agenda, thus strengthened European research and industrial leadership in HPC technologies.
  • Successful transition to practical exascale computing for the addressed specific element of the HPC stack.
  • Covering important segments of the broader and/or emerging HPC markets, especially extreme-computing, emerging use modes and extreme-data HPC systems.
  • Impact on standards bodies and other relevant international research programmes and frameworks.
  • European excellence in mathematics and algorithms for extreme parallelism and extreme data applications to boost research and innovation in scientific areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, life sciences, materials, climate, geosciences, etc.

FETHPC-03-2017Exascale HPC ecosystem developmentd.l. 26-09-2017
Call FETHPC-03-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETHPC-2016-2017)
Exascale HPC ecosystem developmen
Orçamento 4,00 M€

FETHPC-03-2017: Exascale HPC ecosystem development


Specific Challenge:

To develop a sustainable European exascale HPC Ecosystem.

Scope:

Proposals should address a single of the two following subtopics:

a) Coordination of the Exascale HPC strategy and International Collaboration: Proposals must include activities for promoting a joint community structuring and synchronisation; the further development and update of the Strategic Research Agenda for High Performance Computing as well as the application and applied mathematics exascale roadmaps; prepare the ground for targeted international research collaboration on specific aspects of the exascale challenges. Proposed actions should also seek to create synergies with other HPC related activities under H2020, in particular concerning the underlying basic technologies that are required for exascale computing (e.g. LEIT/Advanced Computing, LEIT/Photonics, and ECSEL (Electronic Components and Systems for European Leadership)); and concerning the relevant research in applications, the progress of which critically relies on cutting-edge HPC systems (LEIT/Big-Data, LEIT/Cloud area as well as relevant research in applications emerging from the H2020 Societal Challenges in domains such as health (e.g. VPH initiative), genomics, climate change, energy, mobility and smart cities).

b) Excellence in Exascale Computing Systems: The focus should be in boosting European HPC academic research excellence in future exascale-class computing cutting across all levels – hardware, architectures, programming, applications – and including specific actions to better structure the European academic HPC research, create stronger links with HPC providers and HPC users, attract venture capital, promote entrepreneurship and foster industry take-up.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

    • Strengthened European research and industrial leadership in the supply, operation and use of HPC systems.
    • Contribution to the realisation of the ETP4HPC Strategic Research Agenda.
    • Development of a competitive European ecosystem for building and exploiting a wide range of next-generation extreme performance computing systems.
    • Structuring the efforts of stakeholders for implementing the European HPC strategy.
    • Reinforced cooperation in international endeavours on HPC software and systems towards exascale.
    • European Excellence in Exascale Computing systems

FETOPEN-01-2016-2017FET-Open research and innovation actionsd.l. 27-09-2017
Call FETOPEN-01-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETOPEN-2016-2017)
FET-Open research and innovation actions
Orçamento 110,50 M€
Specific Challenge: The successful exploration of new foundations for radically new future technologies requires supporting a large set of early stage, high risk visionary science and technology projects to investigate new ideas. Here agile, risk-friendly and highly interdisciplinary research approaches are needed with collaborations that are open to all sciences and disciplines and that dissolve the traditional boundaries between them. The renewal of ideas is complemented by the renewal of actors taking these new ideas forward. Therefore, this topic encourages the driving role of new high-potential actors in research and innovation, such as excellent young, both female and male, researchers and high-tech SMEs that may become the scientific and industrial leaders of the future.

Scope: This topic supports the early stages of research to establish a new technological possibility. Proposals are sought for collaborative research with all of the following characteristics ('FET gatekeepers'):  
•    Long-term vision: the research proposed must address a new and radical long-term vision of a science- and technology-enabled future that is far beyond the state of the art and not currently foreseen by technology roadmaps.  
•    Breakthrough scientific and technological target: research must target a scientifically ambitious and technologically concrete breakthrough, argued to be a crucial step towards achieving the long-term vision. The plausibility of the proposed breakthrough(s) to be attained within the life-time of the project must be argued in the proposal.  
•    Novelty: the research proposed for achieving the breakthrough must be based on cutting-edge knowledge, new ideas and concepts, rather than in the mere application or incremental refinement of existing ones.  
•    Foundational: the breakthroughs that are envisaged must be foundational in the sense that, if achieved, they would establish an essential basis for a new kind of technology and its future uses, not currently anticipated.  
•    High-risk: the inherently high risk of the research proposed will be reflected in a flexible but effective methodology for exploring alternative directions and options, supported by open and agile research and innovation practices.  
•    Interdisciplinary: the proposed collaborations are expected to go beyond 'waterfall' configurations in multi-disciplinary science- and technology research. Instead they should seek new solutions through genuine exchanges, mutual learning, cross-fertilisation and synergistic advances among distant disciplines in order to open unexplored areas of investigation and new directions for joint research.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 3 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:   
•    Initiating or consolidating a baseline of feasibility for a radically new line of technology and its future uses by establishing the essential proofs-of-principle and their foundational scientific underpinnings.  
•    Strengthening European leadership in the early exploration of visionary, new and emerging technologies, beyond academic excellence and with global recognition. This impact can be reinforced by involving also new high-potential actors such as young, both female and male, researchers and high-tech SMEs that may become the European scientific and technological leaders and innovators of the future.  
•    Impact is also sought in terms of the take up of new research and innovation practices for making leading-edge science and technology research more open, collaborative, creative and closer to society.  

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action
FETOPEN-03-2017FET-Open Coordination and Support Actionsd.l. 20-03-2017
Call FETOPEN-03-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETOPEN-2016-2017)
FET-Open Coordination and Support Actions
Orçamento 1,50 M€
Specific Challenge:

The challenge is to make Europe the best place in the world for collaborative research and innovation on future and emerging technologies that will renew the basis for future European competitiveness and growth, and that will make a difference for society in the decades to come.

Scope:

Proposals should address one of the following topics:

  1. FET Futures [2017] [[This activity directly aimed at supporting the development and implementation of evidence base for R&I policies is excluded from the delegation to REA and will be implemented by the Commission services.]]: identifying strategy options, challenges and opportunities to stimulate and organise interdisciplinary research and innovation towards new and visionary technologies of any kind. Actions should rely on evidence from FET activities (e.g., portfolio, constituency, results) and from other sources (including other funding bodies or private initiatives worldwide, like those using prize schemes or challenges). They should aim at open and dynamic stakeholder participation using creative methods and on-line tools/social networks. This topic should include public engagement processes as discussed in the introduction of this FET Work Programme.
  2. FET Exchange [2017]: actions for structuring and strengthening an emerging FET-relevant science and technology research and innovation topic and the interdisciplinary communities involved in this topic. This may include, for example, research roadmapping, stimulating (formal and informal) learning and exchange, expanding the range of disciplines (including the life sciences and humanities where relevant), involving new actors such as young researchers, entrepreneurs and high-tech SMEs, and broadening stakeholder engagement (multi-actor or citizen).

For scope item a) at most one action will be funded.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 0.3 and 0.5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Strengthening globally recognised European leadership in the early exploration of visionary, new and emerging technologies, beyond academic excellence and with a strong engagement of scientists, citizens, innovators and policy makers.
Improved long-term innovation potential in Europe both from the abundance of novel ideas and the range of actors ready to take them forward.
Improved understanding of the range of possible impact mechanisms for long-term science and technology research.
Improved readiness across Europe to engage in silo-breaking research collaboration and to take up new research and innovation practices.

FETOPEN-04-2016-2017FET Innovation Launchpadd.l. 29-09-2016
Call FETOPEN-04-2016 (subcall de: H2020-FETOPEN-2016-2017)
FET Innovation Launchpad
Orçamento 1,20 M€
Specific Challenge:

FET projects often generate new and sometimes unexpected opportunities for commercial or societal application. This topic aims at funding further innovation related work (i.e. activities which were not scheduled to be funded by the original project) to verify and substantiate the innovation potential of ideas arising from FET funded projects and to support the next steps in turning them into a genuine social or economic innovation.

Scope:

Short and focused individual or collaborative actions to take out of the lab a promising result or proof-of-concept that originated from a FET-funded project and to get it on the way to social or economic innovation through new entrepreneurship or otherwise. The action will support the transformation of that specific research result into a credible offering for economic or social impact, by exploring the feasibility of an exploitation path and by coordinating and supporting the assembling of the right knowledge, skills and resources and thus serves as a launch pad for exploitation.

This call topic is focused on the early innovation stages from results of an ongoing or recently finished project[[For a project to be considered 'ongoing or recently finished' in the context of this call topic its end date must be at most one year before the deadline for proposal submission to this topic.]] funded through FET under FP7 or H2020. The complementarity and precise link with the relevant FET project is to be explicitly addressed in the proposal by clearly stating the nature and origin of the results to be taken up, and by adding a confirmation of any necessary agreements with owners or right holders of those results to move towards their exploitation. This call topic does not fund additional research, nor does it fund activities that are/were already foreseen in the relevant FET project. Activities to be funded should be fit-for-purpose (e.g., tailored to the level of maturity of the result to be taken up) and can include, among others, the definition of a commercialisation process to be followed, market and competitiveness analysis, technology assessment, consolidation of intellectual property rights and strategy, scenario and business case development, developing contacts and support relevant activities with for instance, industrial transfer partners, potential licence-takers, investors, societal organisations or potential end users.

By focusing on the very early stage of the innovation path, the scope of this call includes situations where an SME or other suitable entrepreneurial context may not yet exist.

The Commission considers that proposals for actions no longer than 18 months and requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 0.1 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals of different duration.

Expected Impact:
  • Increased innovation potential from FET projects by picking up expected as well as non-anticipated innovation opportunities.
  • Creation of concrete and closer-to-market high-potential innovations from FET projects.
  • Stimulating, supporting and rewarding an open and proactive mind-set towards exploitation beyond the European research world.
  • Seeding future growth and the creation of jobs from FET research.
FETPROACT-02-2017FET ERANET Cofundd.l. 24-01-2017
Call FETPROACT-02-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETPROACT-2016-2017)
FET ERANET Cofund
Orçamento 5,00 M€

FETHPC-02-2017: Transition to Exascale Computing

Specific Challenge:

Take advantage of the full capabilities of exascale computing, in particular through high-productivity programming environments, system software and management, exascale I/O and storage in the presence of multiple tiers of data storage, supercomputing for extreme data and emerging HPC use modes, mathematics and algorithms for extreme scale HPC systems for existing or visionary applications, including data-intensive and extreme data applications in scientific areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, life sciences, materials, climate, geosciences, etc.

Scope:

Proposals should address one or more of the following subtopics:

a) High productivity programming environments for exascale: Proposals should have as target to simplify application software development for large- and extreme-scale systems. This can include the development of more productive programming models and environments, the easier combination of different programming models, and using increased intelligence throughout the programming environment. Key aspects include managing data transfers, data locality and memory management, including support for heterogeneous and reconfigurable systems as well as dealing with inter-application dynamic load balancing and malleability, adapting to changes in the number of processors. Unified performance tools are required supporting HPC, embedded and extreme data workloads, on diverse target systems. APIs, runtime systems and the underlying libraries should support auto-tuning for performance and energy optimisation. Automated support for debugging and anomaly detection is also included under this subtopic. To provide simplified development and to ensure the maintainability of domain-specific languages (DSLs), DSL frameworks are required which target a general-purpose stable programming model and runtime. Since large future systems will require the use of multiple programming models or APIs, an important aspect is interoperability and standardisation of programming model, API and runtime as well as the composability of programming models (the capability of building new programming models out of existing programming model elements)

b) Exascale system software and management: Proposals should advance the state of the art in system software and management for node architectures that will be drastically more complex and their resource topology and heterogeneity will require OS and runtime enhancement, such as data aware scheduling. In the area of hardware abstraction, proposals should address run time handling of all types of resources (cores, bandwidth, logical and physical memory or storage) and controls, e.g. for optimised data coherency, consistency and data flow. For applications, proposals should address new multi-criteria resource allocation capabilities and interaction during task execution, with the aim to improve resilience, interactivity, power and efficiency. To cope with the exploding amount of data, the sequential analysis process (capture, store, analyse) is not sufficient; proposals should explore on-the-fly analysis methods offering reactivity, compute efficiency and availability. Graphical simulation interaction will require new real-time features; configuration and deployment tools will have to evolve to take into account the composability of software execution environments.

c) Exascale I/O and storage in the presence of multiple tiers of data storage: proposals should address exascale I/O systems expected to have multiple tiers of data storage technologies, including non-volatile memory. Fine grain data access prioritisation of processes and applications sharing data in these tiers is one of the goals as well as prioritisation applied to file/object creates/deletes. Runtime layers should combine data replication with data layout transformations relevant for HPC, in order to meet the needs for improved performance and resiliency. It is also desirable for the I/O subsystem to adaptively provide optimal performance or reliability especially in the presence of millions of processes simultaneously doing I/O. It is critical that programming system interoperability and standardised APIs are achieved. On the fly data management supporting data processing, taking into account multi-tiered storage and involving real time in situ/in transit processing should be addressed.

d) Supercomputing for Extreme Data and emerging HPC use modes: HPC architectures for real-time and in-situ data analytics are required to support the processing of large-scale and high velocity real-time data (e.g. sensor data, Internet of Things) together with large volumes of stored data (e.g. climate simulations, predictive models, etc.). The approaches should include support for real-time in-memory analysis of different data structures, direct processing of compressed data and appropriate benchmarking method for performance analysis. Interactive 3-D visualisation of large-scale data to allow users to explore large information spaces in 3-D and perform on-demand data analysis in real-time (e.g. large scale queries or analytics) should be addressed. Interactive supercomputing is required to execute complex workflows for urgent decision making in the field of critical clinical diagnostics, natural risks or spread of diseases; this implies adapting operational procedures of HPC infrastructures, developing efficient co-scheduling techniques or improving checkpoint/restart and extreme data management

e) Mathematics and algorithms for extreme scale HPC systems and applications working with extreme data: Specific issues are quantification of uncertainties and noise, multi-scale, multi-physics and extreme data. Mathematical methods, numerical analysis, algorithms and software engineering for extreme parallelism should be addressed. Novel and disruptive algorithmic strategies should be explored to minimize data movement as well as the number of communication and synchronization instances in extreme computing. Parallel-in-time methods may be investigated to boost parallelism of simulation codes across a wide range of application domains. Taking into account data-related uncertainties is essential for the acceptance of numerical simulation in decision making; a unified European VVUQ (Verification Validation and Uncertainty Quantification) package for Exascale computing should be provided by improving methodologies and solving problems limiting usability for very large computations on many-core configurations; access to the VVUQ techniques for the HPC community should be facilitated by providing software that is ready for deployment on supercomputers.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 2 and 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. Proposals should clearly indicate the subtopic which is their main focus. At least one project per subtopic will be funded.

Expected Impact:

  • Contribution to the realisation of the ETP4HPC Strategic Research Agenda, thus strengthened European research and industrial leadership in HPC technologies.
  • Successful transition to practical exascale computing for the addressed specific element of the HPC stack.
  • Covering important segments of the broader and/or emerging HPC markets, especially extreme-computing, emerging use modes and extreme-data HPC systems.
  • Impact on standards bodies and other relevant international research programmes and frameworks.
  • European excellence in mathematics and algorithms for extreme parallelism and extreme data applications to boost research and innovation in scientific areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, life sciences, materials, climate, geosciences, etc.

   

Saúde    <<    NMP+B
NMBP-16-2017Mobilising the European nano-biomedical ecosystemd.l. 19-01-2017
Call H2020-NMBP-2017-CSA (subcall de: H2020-NMBP-2016-2017)
CALL FOR NANOTECHNOLOGIES, ADVANCED MATERIALS, BIOTECHNOLOGY AND PRODUCTION
Orçamento 8,40 M€
Specific Challenge:

Developing innovative nanomedical products for a more personalized, predictive and efficient medicine requires further integration of nanotechnologies aiming at applications in human health notably with further Key Enabling Technologies. It also needs a functioning ecosystem of actors, in which the research, translation, regulation, standardization and take-up of innovative nanomedicines by the different European healthcare systems is stimulated. End-of-life/disposal and recyclability issues should also be addressed as appropriate.

Scope:

Supporting the development of an ecosystem for nanomedicine in Europe, including activities such as coordinating national platforms and regional clusters; developing common training material and services; international cooperation related to community building, road-mapping, regulation, manufacturing, reimbursement and pricing, standardization and recyclability; and reaching out to attract the interest of citizens, young talents and young entrepreneurs. Collaborations with relevant technology platforms or similar initiatives in Europe or worldwide will allow deeper and more effective cross-KETs activities for innovative integrated solution and well as a consolidated international strategy for the sector.

Attention should be paid to achieve a cross-regional, cross-sectoral and cross-technological approach, based on the analysis of relevant roadmaps, strategic research agendas or smart specialisation strategies which have listed nanomedicine or personalised Medicine as one of their priorities. These different approaches might for instance be united into one “meta” roadmap.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:
  • Increased take-up of innovative Nanomedicine solutions by industry and SMEs, end-users, regulatory and public authorities, healthcare insurances, doctors and patients, research organisations and academia;
  • Improvement of cross-KETs activities to provide better integrated healthcare solutions;
  • Increased international networking with new potential market opportunities;
  • Improvement of the competitiveness of the European healthcare sector.
NMBP-13-2017Cross-cutting KETs for diagnostics at the point-of-cared.l. 19-01-2017
Call H2020-NMBP-2017-single-stage (subcall de: H2020-NMBP-2016-2017)
CALL FOR NANOTECHNOLOGIES, ADVANCED MATERIALS, BIOTECHNOLOGY AND PRODUCTION
Orçamento 15,00 M€
Specific Challenge:

Research and technology development at the interface of key enabling technologies has the potential to provide novel technological Micro-Nano–Bio integrated Systems (MNBS) platforms to enhance the ability to sense, detect, analyse, monitor and act on phenomena from macro (e.g. body, organ, tissues) to nano scale (e.g. molecules, genes). These developments have a high potential for facilitating personalised and preventive healthcare. However, the translation of laboratory proven concepts to the clinical environment involving pre-clinical and clinical testing, prototyping, and small series manufacturing is currently lagging. Business development and market growth are therefore still limited. The challenge is to bring new promising laboratory proven MNBS concepts for addressing priority healthcare needs from the laboratory to the clinic.

Scope:

The focus is on further development into a clinical setting of novel MNBS platforms, techniques and systems that have already been proven in a laboratory setting (laboratory Proof-of-Concept). These must pertain to one or more of the following:

  1. In vitro/in vivo diagnostics that are deployed at the point of care;
  2. Therapy monitoring at the point of care.

Proposals should pay attention to facilitate clinical data harvesting, e.g. for medical regulatory purposes and/or to enhance epidemiological monitoring of health and disease patterns. As relevant, the proposed activities should address sex and gender specific aspects[[See definition of the 'gender dimension approach' in the introduction of this Work Programme part.]].

Proposals should demonstrate clear compliance with applicable Good Laboratory Practice /Good Clinical Practice /Good Manufacturing Practice, and be consistent with ISO and other regulations (both national and European). The translation from the pre-clinical phase to early clinical testing, including design and pilot manufacturing in appropriate volume for clinical testing (small series), pre-clinical and early clinical testing is a necessary part of the work-up. Attention should be paid to the requirements for Health Technology Assessment (HTA). Standardisation issues have to be taken into account where appropriate.

Activities are expected to commence at Technology Readiness Levels 3/4 and reach 5-6.

A significant participation of SMEs with R&D capacities is encouraged.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 3 and 5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Proposals should address one or more of the following impact criteria and provide metrics to measure and monitor success.

  • Address priority needs in healthcare diagnostics and / or therapy monitoring, for the benefit of patients;
  • Provide affordable systems with unique features that address specific well identified requirements in healthcare;
  • Progress the development of advanced integrated MNBS based diagnostic health platforms, techniques or systems from the laboratory Proof-of-Concept to the clinical setting;
  • Establish a world-class European competitive industrial R&D and manufacturing competence in Micro-Nano-Bio Systems integration for healthcare diagnostics applications;
  • Strengthening the industrial value chain and progress to marketisation;
  • Early involvement of regulatory bodies and patients in the new developments.

Proposals should include a business case and exploitation strategy, as outlined in the Introduction to the LEIT part of this Work Programme.

This topic will be co-funded by LEIT-ICT and LEIT-NMBP within the context of a Cross-KET initiative for Health, for a total budget of EUR 15 000 000.

NMBP-12-2017Development of a reliable methodology for better risk management of engineered biomaterials in Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products and/or Medical Devicesd.l. 27-10-2016
Call H2020-NMBP-2017-two-stage (subcall de: H2020-NMBP-2016-2017)
CALL FOR NANOTECHNOLOGIES, ADVANCED MATERIALS, BIOTECHNOLOGY AND PRODUCTION
Orçamento 187,47 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de Fecho 2ª Fase: 04-05-2017 (só propostas aprovadas na 1ª Fase podem concorrer à 2ª Fase)
Specific Challenge:

The development of new biotechnology-based products needs to be complemented with a scientifically valid identification of the potential hazards from these biomaterials to human health and to the environment, together with the monitoring and reduction of the risk that these new technologies pose. Current knowledge is still incomplete and the established methods may be inappropriate for specific materials in view of their eventual deployment. The necessary integration of physical, chemical, biochemical and clinical methods is an open challenge. Hence, future production system engineering requires development of integrated and validated methodologies as basis for an appropriate integrated risk management.

Scope:

The development of new biotechnology-based products needs to be complemented with a scientifically valid identification of the potential hazards from these biomaterials to human health and to the environment, together with the monitoring and reduction of the risk that these new technologies pose. Current knowledge is still incomplete and the established methods may be inappropriate for specific materials. Hence, future production system engineering requires validated methodologies as basis for an appropriate integrated risk management. As relevant, the proposed activities should address sex and gender specific aspects[[See definition of the 'gender dimension approach' in the introduction of this Work Programme part.]].

Projects are expected to initiate and support standardisation of the proposed biomaterials and methods, including methods that will reflect their eventual deployment as part of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products and/or Medical Devices.

The expected projects should be related to validating, adapting and/or developing a reliable methodology for risk assessment and thorough overarching hazard identification for engineered biomaterials and should address the following areas:

  • Comparison and validation of current (and/or development including validation of new) test methods and test schemes, including in vitro and in silico methods, to detect adverse effects from biomaterials to:
    • human health including acute and chronic toxicity (oral, inhalation, dermal);
    • modelling toxicity behaviour of engineered Biomaterials, including development of ready-to-use predictive models (web services etc);
    • the environment; eco-toxicity tests, bioaccumulation, persistence, bioavailability and life cycle impacts onto all forms of biota.
  • Relevant reference and/or certified reference materials;
  • Management of accidental risk including explosion and massive release;
  • Methods for performance assessment of hazard and exposure monitoring systems and on the field detection systems;
  • Methods for evaluation of risk reduction strategies and systems.

The implementation of this topic is intended to start at TRL 4 and target TRL 6.

This topic is particularly suitable for international cooperation.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 5 and 8 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:
  • Development of comprehensive understanding of the properties, interaction and fate of engineered biomaterials in relation to human health and environment;
  • Support to policy and decision making concerning biomaterials research in respect to various stakeholders: public authorities, industry, researchers and citizens;
  • Validated test methods and schemes for the identification of potential adverse effects from biomaterials and contribution to the future definition of appropriate measures, where needed;
  • Support to pre and co-normative activities, such as with reference to the implementation of the REACH regulation[[Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2006 concerning the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH), establishing a European Chemicals Agency, amending Directive 1999/45/EC and repealing Council Regulation (EEC) No 793/93 and Commission Regulation (EC) No 1488/94 as well as Council Directive 76/769/EEC and Commission Directives 91/155/EEC, 93/67/EEC, 93/105/EC and 2000/21/EC and amendments]];
  • Support to good governance in biomaterials research following the safe, integrated and responsible approach as laid down in "Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies: An action plan for Europe".
NMBP-14-2017Regulatory Science Framework for assessment of risk benefit ratio of Nanomedicines and Biomaterialsd.l. 27-10-2016
Call H2020-NMBP-2017-two-stage (subcall de: H2020-NMBP-2016-2017)
CALL FOR NANOTECHNOLOGIES, ADVANCED MATERIALS, BIOTECHNOLOGY AND PRODUCTION
Orçamento 187,47 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de Fecho 2ª Fase: 04-05-2017 (só propostas aprovadas na 1ª Fase podem concorrer à 2ª Fase)
Specific Challenge:

The application of nanotechnology and nanobiomaterials has great potential to advance medicine for the benefit of citizens. However, the use of these new technologies poses considerable challenges for assessing the quality, safety and efficacy of the novel nanomedicines and medical devices.

Scope:

Proposals should advance the field of medical regulatory science and practice through the development and validation of science based regulatory knowledge and standardisation of innovative technical tools and methods. The intention is to lead to a new and better methodology for pre-clinical and clinical evaluation and help to take appropriate stock of and to apply innovative scientific advances as and when they occur. As relevant, the proposed activities should address sex and gender specific aspects[[See definition of the 'gender dimension approach' in the introduction of this Work Programme part.]].

Proposals should focus on the development of new regulatory standards and tools that are based on scientific principles that already have a Proof-of-Concept at the laboratory scale.

Where appropriate, proposals should make use of the opportunities for obtaining scientific advice from medical regulatory bodies to support the qualification of innovative development methods.

International cooperation and participation of Member States funding programmes with complementary funding is encouraged to facilitate development of new regulatory science on the global scale.

Established methods, including related equipment, should be brought to Technology Readiness Level 6 and beyond, whereas those based on new concepts are expected to reach TRL 5.

This topic is suitable for international cooperation.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 5 and 8 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

No more than one action will be funded.

Expected Impact:
  • To reduce the cost of pre-clinical and clinical development for new medical products and therapies, that are based on the application of nanotechnology and nanobiomaterials;
  • To reduce the time for innovations to reach the patients;
  • To provide a set of tools for more informed risk assessment and decision making;
  • To improve standardisation of regulatory practice at the European and international level;
  • To establish a close collaboration among regulators, industry, science and patients with regard to the knowledge required for appropriate risk management, and create the basis for common approaches, mutually acceptable datasets and risk management practices;
  • To establish a European Consortium for the Advancement of Regulatory Science in Biomaterials and Nanomedicines, involving industrial, medical, academic, regulatory and patient representative stakeholders;
  • To identify within the consortium critical issues for innovative products and establishment of an action plan for further studies;
  • To establish links with existing European Infrastructures active in the field, along with relevant European Research Networks;
  • To elaborate an action plan for a better integration of the European Union with other regions of the world.
NMBP-15-2017Nanotechnologies for imaging cellular transplants and regenerative processes in vivod.l. 27-10-2016
Call H2020-NMBP-2017-two-stage (subcall de: H2020-NMBP-2016-2017)
CALL FOR NANOTECHNOLOGIES, ADVANCED MATERIALS, BIOTECHNOLOGY AND PRODUCTION
Orçamento 187,47 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de Fecho 2ª Fase: 04-05-2017 (só propostas aprovadas na 1ª Fase podem concorrer à 2ª Fase)
Specific Challenge:

Detection and monitoring of cell and tissue transplants in vivo is of utmost importance for development of clinical cell therapy. Suitable nanotechnology-based imaging approaches with high sensitivity should allow for monitoring of cell viability, engraftment and distribution, also through the use of nanomaterials for cells marking. Appropriate imaging techniques have been developed for application in small animals, but are not available yet for use in preclinical large animal models and patients. In particular, such technologies will represent an important safety measure enabling early detection of cell based therapy.

Scope:

Proposals should focus on the following:

  • Development of highly sensitive imaging approaches enabling discrimination of living cell and tissue transplants based e.g. on optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging and / or nuclear medicine techniques;
  • Monitoring should be highly sensitive, in best case allowing for detection of single cells and cell morphologies;
  • Possibility of non-invasive whole body monitoring (magnetic, optical) in large animals;
  • Development of clinically applicable imaging approaches, taking into account medical regulatory aspects;
  • Interpretation of the data with theoretical models (to be developed if necessary).

As relevant, the proposed activities should address sex and gender specific aspects[[See definition of the 'gender dimension approach' in the introduction of this Work Programme part.]].

Activities are expected to commence at Technology Readiness Levels 3/4 and reach 5/6.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 5 and 7 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:
  • Availability of novel highly sensitive nanotechnology-based imaging approaches allowing for monitoring of survival, engraftment, proliferation, function and whole body distribution of cellular transplants in preclinical large animal models and patients;
  • Imaging technologies facilitating the provision of new regenerative therapies to patients;
  • Opening of a new market sector for imaging equipment and supplies, reinforcement of the European healthcare supply chain and improvement of the competitiveness of the European healthcare sector.

Proposals should include a business case and exploitation strategy, as outlined in the Introduction to the LEIT part of this Work Programme.

NMBP-29-2017Advanced and realistic models and assays for nanomaterial hazard assessmentd.l. 27-10-2016
Call H2020-NMBP-2017-two-stage (subcall de: H2020-NMBP-2016-2017)
CALL FOR NANOTECHNOLOGIES, ADVANCED MATERIALS, BIOTECHNOLOGY AND PRODUCTION
Orçamento 187,47 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de Fecho 2ª Fase: 04-05-2017 (só propostas aprovadas na 1ª Fase podem concorrer à 2ª Fase)
Specific Challenge:

Risk assessment is often largely based on the toxicological profile of the material in question. The reason is that the costs related to hazard assessment are usually not in balance with the costs for exposure monitoring, let alone risk containment or risk mitigation. However with the very big number of new material likely to enter production and use, the usually short period between development and marketing and the increase in societal risk aversion, the classical toxicological testing paradigm so far focusing on in vivo testing is gradually but steadily shifting towards in-vitro and in-silico testing approaches. This is particularly true in the field of nanosafety where, in front of potentially thousands of different nanomaterials, economic constraints make it essential to develop and establish robust, fast and yet reliable and realistic methods that should be applied in figuring out "nanomaterials of concern".

Significant progresses have been made in assessing nanomaterial hazard. Yet, knowledge gaps remain on long-term effects (low doses, chronic exposure), both for human health and the environment. Questions also arise on the adequacy of the models used in existing in-vitro and in-silico testing and on the relevance of the exposure conditions (e.g. linked to the current understanding of the nanomaterial-biomolecule-cell interface) to correctly assess and predict real-life hazards. It is also necessary to prepare the ground for the next challenge, defining hazard profiles based on in-silico testing alone.

Scope:

With a view to intelligent testing strategies (ITS) for nanomaterials, it is of high priority to develop and adopt realistic and advanced in vitro tests which have the potential to substantially improve the relevance of in-vitro approaches. Current in-vitro experiments mostly rely on established immortalized single cell lines, which often do not reflect the in-vivo situation. Therefore, new or advanced models, such as co-culture models, 3D cultures or primary cell models should be developed for relevant endpoints lacking, or having inadequate, in-vitro models. Transport through biological barriers could also be addressed, for instance with the objective of assessing the true internal dose of the materials to which living organisms are being exposed, as well as disease models or models with impaired barriers.

Low-level chronic exposure is a likely scenario as many ENMs will probably exist at very low concentrations in the environment and potentially be persistent. Thus, assays and models with low chronic exposure, elucidating toxicokinetics, different mechanisms of action and adverse outcome pathways, as well as specific disease models, should be developed and assessed against appropriate animal studies and could include for instance effects on kinetics, growth, reproduction, metabolism, and behaviour. Research could also focus on long-term, ecologically relevant, effects in realistic environmental concentrations of ENMs.

The transformations in biological or environmental matrices have been demonstrated as having potentially significant effect on the ENM tests results. Therefore, dosing with realistic exposure levels and conditions should be an integral part of the developments, taking into consideration the dynamic and complex nature of environmentally induced transformations with realistic external and internal forms and levels of exposure.

For validation purposes and to ensure that the experimental results can form a solid and meaningful basis for grouping, read-across, and modelling purposes, the testing should be performed on sets of well-defined and characterised libraries of nanomaterials and, when possible, on nanomaterials for which high-quality in-vivo data are already existing (to minimize animal testing).

Activities are expected to focus on Technology Readiness Levels 4 to 6.

This topic is particularly suitable for international cooperation.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 10 and 13 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

No more than one action will be funded.

Expected Impact:
  • The research approach should be innovative and represent a significant advance beyond the current state-of-the-art. Research should focus on provision of solutions to the long-term challenge of nanosafety and nanoregulation;
  • New models and assays for use in in-vitro and in-silico testing improving prediction of chronic effects in a broad array of representative organisms and changes in ecosystem function;
  • Improved predictive power of in-vitro and in-silico approaches for in vivo systems to support acceptance in a regulatory framework;
  • Developed test guidelines for further standardisation, and ring testing (including guidance on design of the ring testing).

   

Saúde    <<    ICT
EUB-02-2017IoT Pilotsd.l. 14-03-2017
Call H2020-EUB-2017
EU-Brazil Joint Call
Orçamento 8,00 M€
Specific Challenge: In order to make use of the rich potential of the Internet of Things (IoT) in real-world scenarios, technologies and tools developed so far need to be demonstrated in controlled environments with the ultimate goal of validation. Given the specific nature of this Call, widely replicable pilots are targeted in view of solving specific societal challenges, in the context of EU-Brazil cooperation.
Given the considerable amount of work carried out on M2M/IoT and Cyber Physical Systems architectures (e.g. IoT-A), platforms (e.g. FIWARE, CRYSTAL, SOFIA) and standards (e.g. oneM2M) over the last few years, pilots are encouraged to exploit this previous work where applicable. The goal is to further demonstrate the generic applicability of these architectures, platforms and standards and to identify where standards are missing or should evolve, as well as relevant pre-normative activities.
Pilots aim at validating IoT approaches to specific socio-economic challenges in real-life settings. Pilots' objectives include user acceptability, technology assessment and optimisation, business model validation, approaches to sustainability and replicability. They should be implemented through close cooperation between users and suppliers with the active involvement of relevant stakeholders on the demand side.

Scope: Research and Innovation Actions
IoT finds applicability in a broad range of industry, business and public services scenarios. Specific focus will be on implementing pilots incorporating the whole value-chain, and involving all relevant stakeholders, in particular end-users. Where relevant, institutional involvement may be appropriate.
The joint call would support three pilots each addressing a distinct area among the following areas of interest for EU-Brazil collaboration:  
•    Environmental monitoring  
Environmental and carbon footprint –as well as energy and water consumption- can be drastically reduced by an optimised management both along and across value-chains.Sensors can be used to measure and monitor a series of distinct environmental variables. The data collected across different areas can in turn be used for data analytics and decision-making. A pilot combining a system approach to integrate a large number of sensors across a large set of variables will test the acceptability and scalability of the selected IoT platform and test how to optimise results and reduce costs, as well as validating standards and interoperability.  
•    Utilities: smart water management
Smart water management can reduce leakages, optimise watering and irrigation and improve water consumption both in cities and for agricultural purposes.A pilot focusing on integrated solutions enabling real-time interconnection of heterogeneous sensors and actuators, geo-localisation and data fusion including data from meteorological forecast will test the acceptability and scalability of the selected IoT platform. High reliability and low maintenance costs are key parameters as well as the possibility to replicate the pilot in other locations.  
•    Utilities: energy management at home and in buildings      
A group of IoT use cases in the area of the residential smart grid that involve the use of a home energy management system (HEMS) that would exploit automation and self-learning capabilities to monitor and steer local energy consumption (electricity and carbon fuels) and generation. This includes the better steering of HVAC units according to thermostats, weather forecasts, dynamic electricity pricing, and availability of (locally) generated renewable energy.  
•    Smart assisted living and wellbeing  
A group of IoT use cases which use intelligent devices (e.g. wearables, sensors, smartphones, and intelligent home appliances) to autonomously generate reports on an individual's physical activity, overall vital signs and well-being. It allows the use and sharing of generated data for personal use or report to specific services (e.g. doctors, nurses, dieticians and sport coaches) through connected devices. It also enables "smart assisted living": the remote follow-up of vulnerable people (children, elderly, hospital patients, etc.) and the automated notification of emergency services, family, etc. when necessary.  
•    Smart manufacturing: customisation
A group of IoT use cases that enable the production of customised outputs. Such production systems combine the low unit costs of mass production processes with the flexibility of individual customisation. This includes:  
•    Continuous Additive Manufacturing;  
•    Flexible automation for robot manufacturing;  
•    Robot systems for additive manufacturing;  
•    Production of one-of-a-kind customer designs; and dynamic production systems and shop floors - mobile robot for efficient and flexible use in cleanrooms.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU up to EUR 1.5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately by three distinct projects. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. Three projects in three different areas are expected.

Expected Impact: Pilots should empower citizens, both in the public and private spheres, and businesses, as well as improve the associated public services where appropriate. Pilots are not only expected to validate technologies and architectures for a specific set of use cases requirements, but also the related business models to guarantee the sustainability of the approach. Security and privacy aspects relating to access to and processing of collected information need to be properly taken into consideration.
Improved sharing of information, approaches and solutions, as well as expertise through:  
•    pilots on both sides and across the Atlantic, involving end-users.  
•    establishing common benchmarks;  
•    contributing to standardisation and to open-source and open-data repositories  
•    linking with ongoing work in the IoT Focus Area.
 
Type of Action: Research and Innovation action
ICT-07-20175G PPP Research and Validation of critical technologies and systemsd.l. 08-11-2016
Call H2020-ICT-2017-1 (subcall de: H2020-ICT-2017)
Information and Communication Technologies
Orçamento 233,50 M€
Specific Challenge: This challenge frames the 5G PPP initiative, whose phase 2 will be implemented under this LEIT-ICT Work Programme. The challenge is to eliminate the current and anticipated limitations of network infrastructures, by making them capable of supporting a much wider array of requirement than is the case today and with capability of flexibly adapting to different "vertical" application requirements. The vision is that in ten years from now, telecom and IT will be integrated in a common very high capacity and flexible 5G ubiquitous infrastructure, with seamless integration of heterogeneous wired and wireless capabilities. 5G Networks have to cover a wide range of services from different use case and application areas/verticals, for increasingly capable user terminals, and for an extremely diverse set of connected machines and things; to cope with an increasingly cloud-based service access (>90% of the internet traffic will go through data centres); to support a shift from the “Client-Server” model to “Anything” as a Service (XaaS), without needs of owning hardware, software or the cognitive objects themselves. Network elements will become "computing equivalent" elements that gather programmable resources, interfaces and functions based on virtualisation technologies, to implement control functionalities ad-how as a function of the use case.
This challenge includes optimisation of cost functions (capex/opex) and of scarce resources (e.g. energy, spectrum), as well as migration towards new network architectures.
A particular issue is to leverage work and results of phase 1 (WP 2014-15)  and to accelerate on proof of concepts and demonstrators. Where technological maturity permits, validation of research results, of the most demanding KPI's and of the most promising 5G technology options will be supported by experimental testing conducted in the context of use case in active cooperation with the various potential "vertical" sectors driving the innovative requirements. This validation activity is also expected to be boldly leveraged in the context of the important standardisation (3G PP) and spectrum (WRC 19) milestones that will appear over this WP implementation period.

Scope: a. Research and Innovation Actions covers three strands that complement each other. Proposal may address parts of a strand or parts that cut across several strands.
Strand 1 covers wireless access and radio network architecture/technologies:  
•    Novel air interface technologies i) supporting efficiently a heterogeneous set of requirements from low rate sensors including mission critical M2M communications to very high rate HD/3D TV and immersive services; ii) supporting local and wide area systems, heterogeneous multi-layer deployments, assuring uniform performance coverage, capacity, e.g. through advanced Multi Antenna Transceiver Techniques, including 3D and massive MIMO beam-forming; iii) enabling usage of frequency bands above 6GHz, for ultra-high speed access, backhaul and fronthaul, based on fully characterised channel models.  
•    Hardware architectures technologies and building blocks for 5G low cost low-within relevant spectrum range;  
•    (Radio) Network functional architectures and interfaces leading to a stable vision / reference architecture for 5G in support of the standardisation work expected to culminate under the 2017-2020 period. It provides a platform for technical coordination with other 5G initiatives. This architecture efficiently supports different deployment topologies ranging from fully distributed to fully centralised, with reduced management complexity and minimised signalling overhead. It also covers technologies like WiFi. It supports the “5G services and verticals” framework embracing the machine-type of communication services, the Internet of Things. It covers solutions that unify connection, security, mobility, multicast/broadcast and routing/forwarding management capable of instantiating any type of virtual network architecture;  
•    Co-operative operation of heterogeneous access networks integrating virtual radio functions into service delivery networks, including broadcast/multicast technologies (terrestrial and satellite based) and supporting Software Defined Networking (SDN) and virtualisation techniques of RAN functions, providing the environment for multi-base station attachment;  
•    Support of numerous devices with different capabilities, with unified connectivity management capabilities, in terms of security, mobility and routing. It includes cloud and edge computing for low latency requirements and carrier grade communications for Machine Type Communications (MTC) with resource-constrained sensor and actuator nodes with multi-year battery life operation;  
•    Coordination and optimization of user access to heterogeneous radio accesses including ultra-dense networks, supported by intelligent radio resource management framework. This covers the joint management of the resources in the wireless access and the backhaul/fronthaul as well as their integration with optical or legacy copper networks;  
•    Multi-tenancy for Radio Access Network (RAN) sharing, covering ultra-dense network deployments with the ability to allocate traffic to shared MNOs infrastructure while satisfying their SLAs. Load and deployment are key aspects. Impacts in other segments of the network (e.g., backhaul), is taken into account for joint management;  
•    Integration of Satellite Networks to support ubiquitous coverage, resilience, specific markets, and where appropriate further complement terrestrial technologies (e.g. in traffic off loading, backhaul, or content delivery).
Strand 2: High capacity elastic - optical networks
The objective is to support very high traffic and capacity increase originating from an (5G) heterogeneous access networks with matching capabilities from the core and metro environments, at ever increasing speeds and in more flexible and adaptive form. It covers new spectrally efficient, adaptive transmission, networking, control and management approaches to increase network capacity by a factor of >100 while at the same time providing high service granularity, guarantees for end-to-end optimization and QoS - reducing power consumption, footprint and cost per bit and maintaining reach. The integration of such new optical transport and transmission designs with novel network control and management paradigms (e.g., SDN) are expected to enable programmability.
Disruptive approaches for a massive capacity scaling may impact network infrastructure, and system architectures which need to be assessed for integration and migration aspects.
Strand 3 covers the "Software Network", including work on:  
•    Software network architecture to support an access agnostic converged core network and control framework enabling next generation services (including services for vertical sectors) and integrating next generation access and devices. The architecture leverages the SDN/NFV paradigm and is able to integrate/manage next generation transport and optical technologies, both for backhaul and fronthaul, to flexibly meet increasing system capacity requirements;  
•    A unified management of connectivity, with end to end security mobility and routing (including multicast/broadcast) beyond current concepts (e.g. tunnelling) for flexible introduction of new services. This aims at a unified physical infrastructure and includes corresponding abstractions – (virtual) resources, functions, hardware etc. – for control and orchestration. Solutions to provision SDN networks across administrative boundaries (e.g. multiple operators, customer networks, datacentres) and interoperability issues between multiple SDN control domains are in scope;  
•    Solutions (e.g API's and corresponding abstractions) that allow re-location or anycast search of services and their components, as a function of the context. This includes problems involved in portability of virtual network functions and naming of deployed functions and services. It supports co-existence of multiple network domains and easy migration;  
•    Scalability and efficiency related to increasing deployment of software-based network equipment and functions as well as corresponding more diverse services and usages. These include ease of deployment of multitenant networks, cost and energy efficiency, "five 9" reliability, flexibility and perceived "zero latency" where relevant;  
•    Realisation of the "plug and play vision” for computing, storage and network resources through appropriate abstraction, interfaces, and layering. It covers the full network infrastructure from core network to heterogeneous access, also with integration of the 5G architecture with legacy infrastructure. The target is for a Network Operating System (NOS) with hardware and user interfaces to manage and orchestrate unified access to computing, storage, memory and networking resources. The approach towards a NOS may also be considered in the context of experimental facilities, in view of integrating multiple heterogeneous European experimental facilities. The goal is to allow proper testing and comparison of the different 5G technological components. OSS solutions are preferred;  
•    Management and security for virtualised networks and services to support service deployment decisions related with location and lifecycle management of network functions, and flexible configuration of network nodes. Network analytics tools, knowledge reasoning and cognition, may be extended towards network operations to cope with complex, heterogeneous, and dynamic networks featuring large numbers of nodes, and to correlate all monitoring sources in order to create a real-time supervision of Quality of Service and Quality of Experience. Management of security (privacy where appropriate) across multiple virtualised domains is a key aspect to be cobered by this call.
For the 3 strands above, projects will be implemented as a programme and be expected to actively contribute key horizontal results to the integration process led by the programme level CSA. Therefore all grants awarded under this topic will be complementary to each other and to the grant agreement(s) under the topic ICT-08-2017 a). The respective options of Article 2, Article 31.6 and Article 41.4 of the Model Grant Agreement will be applied  . International cooperation with clear EU industrial benefits may be considered, preferably with nations having launched strategic 5G initiatives (e.g. China, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, USA).
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 5 and 8 million would allow this area to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts, in particular for proposals targeting significant experiment/demonstrations activities in relation to well identified use cases justifying higher amounts.
b. Coordination and Support Actions
5G PPP projects will be implemented as a programme through the use of complementary grants and the respective options of Article 2, Article 31.6 and Article 41.4 of the Model Grant Agreement   will be applied. This calls for activities to ensure a sound programmatic view of the implemented 5G Research and Innovation Actions (RIA) and Innovation Actions (IA) results. The proposed support actions shall liaise with the 5G RIA and IA actions to exploit synergies in the implementation of the activities that include:  
•    Programme level integration through management and orchestration of 5G PPP project cooperation for horizontal issues of common interests (security, energy efficiency, spectrum, standardisation, societal impact of 5G…) in support of the commitments of the 5G PPP contractual arrangement and mapping the strategic programme of the 5G industrial Association;  
•    Portfolio analysis, coverage, mapping and gap analysis, roadmaps for key PPP technologies and for experimental requirements and facilities, also taking into account national developments;  
•    Proactive support to the emergence of a 5G PPP "5G vision", to key international co-operation activities. A clear proactive strategy is expected to channel relevant 5G PPP project outcomes towards key SDO's like 3G PP (standardisation work expected to start in 2016) and to valorise relevant spectrum work in the context of future WRC's;  
•    Organisation of stakeholder events, including reaching out to users and key verticals;  
•    Monitoring of the openness, fairness and transparency of the PPP process, including sector commitments and leveraging factor;  •    Maintenance of the "5G web site".
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU up to EUR 3 million would allow this area to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact: a. Research and Innovation Actions   
•    Overarching impact: 40% of the world communication infrastructure market for EU headquartered companies;  
•    Demonstrated progress towards core 5G PPP KPI's: 1000x capacity, 1ms latency, 90% energy savings, 10x battery lifetime, service creation in minutes, better/increased/ubiquitous coverage, 10 times to 100 times higher typical user data rate, 10 times lower energy consumption for low power Machine type communication, Lowered EMF levels compared to LTE solutions;  
•    Novel business models through innovative sharing of network resources across multiple actors;  
•    Finer grained management of optical metro and core capacity and capacity increase by a factor of 100 (only for Strand 2);  
•    Optimised optical backhaul architectures and technologies (only for Strand 2);  
•    Ubiquitous 5G access including in low density areas (only for Strand 1 and 2);  
•    Definition of 5G network architecture and of core technological components (only for Strand 1 and 3);  
•    Proactive contribution to the 3G PP standardisation activity on 5G, and to other standardisation activities, e.g. ONF, ETSI-NFV, IEEE; proactive contribution to the WRC 19 preparation for 5G spectrum.  
•    Proof-of-concept and demonstrators beyond phase one and validating core functionalities and KPI's in the context of specific use cases with verticals closely associated to the demonstrations and validation. Indicative sectors include: automotive, connected cars; eHealth; video/TV broadcast; Energy management; very high density locations and events (only for Strand 1 and 3);  
•    Novel connectivity paradigms, beyond the Client server model and enabling massive edge network deployments (only for Strand 1 and 3);  
•    Network function implementation through generic IT servers (target) rather than on non-programmable specific firmware (today) (only for Strand 3);  
•    OS like capabilities to orchestrate network resources (only for Strand 3);  
•    Trustworthy interoperability across multiple virtualised operational domains, networks and data centres;  
•    Solutions for the management of multi domain virtualised networks with coverage of security architectures based on industry characterised threat models.
b. Coordination and Support Actions  
•    Maximised output and exploitation of 5G PPP project results in key domains (standardisation, spectrum) through managed projects cooperation on horizontal issues;  
•    Constituency building, stakeholder support, support to key international cooperation events; dissemination, support to core international cooperation activities, to relevant stakeholder events;
•    Definition of future R&I actions through roadmapping.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action, Coordination and support action

ICT-11-2017Collective Awareness Platforms for Sustainability and Social Innovationd.l. 25-04-2017
Call H2020-ICT-2017-2 (subcall de: H2020-ICT-2017)
Information and Communication Technologies
Orçamento 392,00 M€
Specific Challenge: Today Europe fails to capitalise fully on participatory innovation; more models and blueprints are needed to lead to new ways to produce collective intelligence in key sustainability areas, leveraging on open data, knowledge networks, open hardware and Internet of things. The challenge is to demonstrate that innovative combinations of existing or emerging network technologies enable new Digital Social Innovation which can better cope with emerging sustainability challenges, achieving mass adoption and measurable global impact.

Scope: a. Innovation Actions: pilots of Collective Awareness Platforms (CAPs) demonstrating new forms of bottom-up innovation and social collaboration exploiting digital hyper-connectivity and collaborative tools based on open data, open knowledge, open source software and open hardware, harnessing crowdsourcing or crowdfunding models. Within this vision, target areas for pilots include:  
•    New participatory innovation models for economy and society, such as the collaborative or circular economy, collaborative public services and collaborative making;  
•    Solutions for sustainable lifestyles such as collaborative consumption and production, smart reuse and low carbon approaches;  
•    Emerging ethics of digital innovation, such as social entrepreneurship, direct democracy, privacy preservation and digital rights.
Proposals are expected to leverage on fresh grassroots ideas and civil society participation in the broad digital social innovation domain, and should:  
•    Include in consortia an existing and motivated community of citizens, to drive platform development;  
•    Base the platforms on an appropriate combination of existing or emerging network technologies (e.g. distributed social networks, wikis, sensors, blockchains);  
•    Demonstrate a durable multidisciplinary collaboration by including in the consortia at least two entities whose main focus of interest is beyond the ICT domain.
Proposers are encouraged to integrate different platforms, addressing several sustainability challenges at a time, in order to achieve critical mass and measurable global impact.
Preference will be given to proposals engaging civil society at large, for instance through NGOs, local communities, social enterprises, non-profit organisations, students and hackers.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. Minimum one action per target area will be selected.
b. Coordination and support Actions, to coordinate and support the CAPs initiative and the underlying broader digital social innovation constituency, by identifying links and synergies among different projects, and ensuring visibility and contacts at European and international level.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 0.2 and 0.8 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact: Proposals should address as many as possible of the following criteria, possibly defining appropriate metrics to measure impact  
•    Demonstrate increased effectiveness, compared to existing solutions to societal and sustainability challenges, of new bottom-up, open and distributed approaches exploiting network effects and based on open data and open hardware;  
•    Capability to reach a critical mass of European citizens and to transpose the proposed approaches to other application areas related to sustainability;  
•    Achieve effective involvement of citizens and relevant new actors in decision making, collective governance, new democracy models, self-regulation, citizen science and citizens' observatories, new business and economic models.  
•    Achieve measurable improvement in cooperation among citizens, (including elderly), researchers, public authorities, private companies and civil society organisation in the development of new sustainable and collaborative consumption patterns, new lifestyles, and innovative product and service creation and information delivery.  
•    Demonstrate the applicability of concrete and measurable indicators to assess the social impact and the "social return of investment" of the proposed solutions.

Type of Action: Innovation action, Coordination and support action
ICT-14-2016-2017Big Data PPP: cross-sectorial and cross-lingual data integration and experimentationd.l. 25-04-2017
Call H2020-ICT-2017-2 (subcall de: H2020-ICT-2017)
Information and Communication Technologies
Orçamento 392,00 M€
Specific Challenge: Europe lacks a systematic transfer of knowledge and technology across different sectors and there is an underdeveloped data sharing and linking culture. Traditionally, data has been collected and used for a certain purpose within sectorial "silos", while using data across sectors for offering new services opens new opportunities for solving business and societal challenges. The lack of agreed standards and formats, and the low rates of publishing data assets in machine discoverable formats further hold back data integration. The fact that textual data appears in many languages creates an additional challenge for sharing and linking such data. Finally, there is a lack in Europe of secure environments where researchers and SMEs can test innovative services and product ideas based on open data and business data.
The challenge is to break these barriers and to foster exchange, linking and re-use, as well as to integrate data assets from multiple sectors and across languages and formats. A more specific challenge is to create a stimulating, encouraging and safe environment for experiments where not only data assets but also knowledge and technologies can be shared.

Scope: Proposals should cover one of the following bullets:  
a.    Data integration activities will address data challenges in cross-domain setups, where similar contributions of data assets will be required by groups of EU industries that are arranged along data value chains (i.e. such that the value extracted by a company in a given industrial sector is greatly increased by the availability and reuse of data produced by other companies in different industrial sectors). The actions will cover the range from informal collaboration to formal specification of standards and will include (but not be limited to) the operation of shared systems of entity identifiers (so that data about the same entity could be easily assembled from different sources), the definition of agreed data models (so that two companies carrying out the same basic activity would produce data organised in the same way, to the benefit of developers of data analytics tools), support for multilingual data management, data brokerage schemes and the definition of agreed processes to ensure data quality and the protection of commercial confidentiality and personal data. The actions are encouraged to make use of existing data infrastructures and platforms.  
b.    Data experimentation incubators should address big data experimentation in a cross-sectorial, cross lingual and/or cross-border setup. This setup should include access to data in different domains and languages, appropriate computational infrastructure, and open software tools. The incubator should make these available to the experimenters, who are expected to be mainly SMEs, web entrepreneurs and start-ups. Experimentation is to be conducted on horizontal/vertical contributed data pools provided by the incubator. At least half of the experiments should address challenges of industrial importance jointly defined by the data providers, where quantitative performance targets are defined beforehand and results measured against them. Effective cross-sector and cross-border exchange and re-use of data are key elements in the experiments ecosystem supported by the incubators. Therefore, the incubators are expected to address the technical, linguistic, legal, organisational, and IPR issues, and provide a supported environment for running the experiments. To remain flexible on which experiments are carried out and to allow for a fast turn-over of data experimentation activities, the action may involve financial support to third parties, in line with the conditions set out in part K of the General Annexes. The proposal will define the selection process of the experimenters running the data activities for which financial support will be granted (typically in the order of EUR 50 000 – 100 000  per party). At least 70% of the EU funding shall be allocated to this purpose. Experiments are expected to run for a maximum of 6 months, while the incubator should run for a minimum of three years. The proposals are expected to explain how the incubator would become self-sustaining by the end of the funded duration of action.      
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 1 and 3 million (for the data integration activities under a) or about EUR 7 million (for the incubators under b) would allow this area to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact: a. Data integration activities  
•    Data integration activities will simplify data analytics carried out over datasets independently produced by different companies and shorten time to market for new products and services;  
•    Substantial increase in the number and size of data sets processed and integrated by the data integration activities;  
•    Substantial increase in the number of competitive services provided for integrating data across sectors;  
•    Increase in revenue by 20% (by 2020) generated by European data companies through selling integrated data and data integration services offered.
b. Data experimentation incubators  
•    At least 100 SMEs and web entrepreneurs, including start-ups, participate in data experimentation incubators;  
•    30% annual increase in the number of Big Data Value use cases supported by the data experimentation incubators;  
•    Substantial increase in the total amount of data made available in the data experimentation incubators including closed data;  
•    Emergence of innovative incubator concepts and business models that allow the incubator to continue operations past the end of the funded duration.

Type of Action: Innovation action
ICT-15-2016-2017Big Data PPP: Large Scale Pilot actions in sectors best benefitting from data-driven innovationd.l. 25-04-2017
Call H2020-ICT-2017-2 (subcall de: H2020-ICT-2017)
Information and Communication Technologies
Orçamento 392,00 M€
Specific Challenge: European research and development in data technologies produces promising results, but these are not yet deployed at large scale in a systematic manner. The challenge is to stimulate effective piloting and targeted demonstrations in large-scale sectorial actions ("Large Scale Pilot actions"), in data-intensive sectors, involving key European industry actors. The Large Scale Pilot actions are meant to serve as best practice examples to be transferred to other sectors and also as sources of generic solutions to all data intensive sectors.

Scope: Large Scale Pilot actions should address domains of strategic importance for EU industry and carry out large scale sectorial demonstrations which can be replicated and transferred across the EU and in other contexts.
Possible industrial sectors for Large Scale Pilot actions include (but are not limited to) health, energy, environment, earth observation, geospatial, transport, manufacturing, finance and media. Although Large Scale Pilot actions are required to have a strong focus in a given industrial domain, they may involve cross-domain activities where these provide clear added value. Large Scale Pilot actions will propose replicable solutions by using existing technologies or very near-to-market technologies that could be integrated in an innovative way and show evidence of data value (see the section "Expected Impact"). Their objective is to demonstrate how industrial sectors will be transformed by putting data harvesting and analytics at their core.
Large Scale Pilot actions are expected to exhibit substantial visibility, mobilisation, and commercial and technological impact. Proposals should demonstrate that they have access to appropriately large, complex and realistic data sets.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 10 and 15 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:   
•    Demonstrated increase of productivity in main target sector of the Large Scale Pilot Action by at least 20%;  
•    Increase of market share of Big Data technology providers of at least 25% if implemented commercially within the main target sector of the Large Scale Pilot Action;  
•    Doubling the use of Big Data technology in the main target sector of the Large Scale Pilot Action;  
•    Leveraging additional target sector investments, equal to at least the EC investment;  
•    At least 100 organizations participating actively in Big Data demonstrations (not necessarily as partners of the projects).

Type of Action: Innovation action
ICT-25-2016-2017Advanced robot capabilities research and take-upd.l. 25-04-2017
Call H2020-ICT-2017-2 (subcall de: H2020-ICT-2017)
Information and Communication Technologies
Orçamento 392,00 M€
Specific Challenge: RAS technology has evolved significantly in the past decade, moving robots out of constrained environments and into the workplace or home. Technologies ranging from mechatronics to sensing, manipulation and mobility have all contributed to this evolution. However the easy deployment of smart robots in everyday life is still beyond the technical capability of most current laboratory prototypes.
The specific challenge here is to develop robots that respond more flexibly, robustly and efficiently to the everyday needs of workers and citizens in professional or domestic environments, and which will also maintain Europe at the forefront of global research and development. The actions will address the whole research value chain, whether generic technology, developing RAS building blocks in the form of key technical capabilities, or market-led prototypes directly involving end users. End users will help drive Innovation Actions as active partners, setting the operating parameters for a given application as well as testing and validating the prototype solutions.

Scope: Research and Innovation Actions addressing generic advances and technical capabilities:
a. Open, generic forward-looking research into novel technical advances in robotics – open to all robotics-related research topics and disciplines. Proposals are expected to address technical topics which cut across application domains and which can be developed further with a view to achieving high future impact on markets or societal sectors in Europe.
b. Technology research and development to achieve step changes in the capabilities of the following high priority RAS technologies: systems development, human-robot interaction, mechatronics, perception, navigation and cognition. Step changes are sought through either a multiplicative improvement in technical capability, for example achieving a difference in order of magnitude in the number of everyday objects a robot can recognise or handle, or a categorical advance, for example moving from rigid to intuitive human-robot interfaces.
The Commission considers that the open research and the technical capabilities proposals are expected to require EUR 2 to 4 million each; nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. At least one action will be supported for each bullet (a or b above). Proposals are expected to identify which bullet is their main centre of gravity.
Innovation Actions driven by end users:
c. Improving the deployment prospects of RAS through end user-driven application developments in domains and application areas with significant market potential. Proposals are expected to address system development beyond TRL 5.
The outputs will not be purely technological; actions will generate economic and operational data that will provide a valuable basis for setting operating parameters and for reducing commercial risks for future investors.
d. Filling technology or regulatory gaps through end user-driven innovation actions, where the gap represents a challenging market entry barrier. Proposals are expected to address a gap in either technical capability or system ability. The targeted gap and the required steps to tackle the gap must be clearly identified in the proposal.
The Commission considers that End-user proposals are expected to require 2 to 4 million each; nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. At least one action will be supported for each bullet (c or d above). Proposals are expected to identify which bullet is their main centre of gravity.

Expected Impact: The expected impacts for the Research and Innovation Actions are:  
•    Promote excellent science and technology knowledge in Europe, demonstrated by a high standard of research outputs (including publications, open source software or, as appropriate, patents);  
•    Develop a new generation of robotic and autonomous systems with clear and measurable progress over the state of the art in terms of step changes in technical capabilities, as evidenced by improvements in performance (including in terms of affordability, reliability and robustness, energy autonomy and user acceptability);  
•    Greater industrial relevance of research actions and output as demonstrated by deeper involvement of industry and stronger take-up of research results;  
•    Fostering new links between academia and industry, accelerating and broadening technology transfer;  
•    Contributing by 2020 to the strategic vision of a more competitive positioning of European robotics providers in the marketplace, in terms of their penetration in new or emerging robotics sectors.
The expected impacts for the Innovation Actions on end-user research are:  
•    Increasing the market-readiness of robotics applications including in terms of technological validation outside the laboratory and of sound operational and cost-benefit models;  
•    Lowering of market entry barriers of a business or regulatory nature and increasing industrial and commercial investment in Europe at a rate comparable with other global regions;   
•    Contributing to the faster growth of competitive small and mid-scale robotics companies in Europe.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action, Innovation action
ICT-30-2017Photonics KET 2017d.l. 25-04-2017
Call H2020-ICT-2017-2 (subcall de: H2020-ICT-2017)
Information and Communication Technologies
Orçamento 392,00 M€
Specific Challenge: Investments in R&D&I are essential for reinforcing Europe's industrial competitiveness and leadership in photonic market sectors where Europe is strong (e.g. in communications, medical photonics, sensing) and to seize new opportunities. Europe also needs to strengthen its manufacturing base in photonics to safeguard the further potential for innovation and value creation and for job creation. We must better exploit the large enabling potential of photonics in many industrial sectors and in solutions addressing major societal challenges such as health and well-being, energy efficiency or safety. Finally, Europe needs to better exploit the innovation capacity of the photonics SMEs and the innovation leverage potential of the innovation clusters and national platforms.

Scope: a. Research and Innovation Actions
All R&I actions should demonstrate strong industrial commitment, be driven by user needs and concrete exploitation strategies, and they should cover the value/supply chain as appropriate. They should address manufacturability and include standardisation activities as appropriate. Focus is on one of the following themes:  
i.    Application driven core photonic technology developments for a new generation of photonic devices (including components, modules and sub-systems) for agile Petabit/s Optical Core and Metro Networks. The objective is to develop new photonic technologies for metro and core networks allowing capacities of Pb/s per node, and Tb/s per channel and 100 Tb/s per link over increased transport distances, while supporting network programmability features and fitting network operator requirements and roadmaps. Actions should include all new device developments for the envisaged network architecture. The action should also lead to network solutions with an energy consumption and equipment footprint reduction by more than 10 and a significant reduction in network cost. Actions may include system, network, control and security level aspects to the extent necessary for the action.  
ii.    Photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technology: The objective is to achieve major advances in chip integration technology, enabling a cost effective volume manufacturing of PICs with significantly enhanced performances (e.g. integration complexity, footprint, energy efficiency, speed, …) or new functions. Potential for such technology advances exists e.g. in selective area growth for multi-function integration, wider band-gap engineering, heterogeneous integration, wafer-scale electronic-photonic integration, the use of new materials, and in new approaches to small and efficient laser sources. Actions may address also the related design methodology and tools and the optimisation of materials, and should include a validation of results with fabricated PIC prototypes.  
iii.    Disruptive approaches to optical manufacturing by 2 and 3 D opto-structuring: The objective is to develop new optical manufacturing approaches for photonic components with unprecedented resolution (down to the submicron and nano-scale) or for functionalization of the surface of the materials to tailor and optimise their characteristics for a specific application. Actions may also address the related material. Novelty may be related for example to the laser source, to the optical system for light manipulation, to light-matter interaction or to the exploitation of quantum effects. Actions should include the validation of the manufacturing approach through a functional prototype of an application relevant device that goes clearly beyond the state of the art.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 6 and 8 million (for theme a.i), between EUR 3 and 4 million (for theme a.ii and a.iii) would allow these themes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. Minimum one action per theme will be selected.
b. Innovation Actions
Focus is on one of the following themes:
i. Innovation Incubator for SMEs
The objective is to reinforce the competitiveness of photonics and end-user industries, in particular SMEs, by providing them one-stop-shop access, supported through competence centres, to services and capabilities such as expertise, training, prototyping, design, engineering or pilot manufacturing services for first users and early adopters enabling the wider adoption and deployment of photonic technologies in innovative products. The service to be provided to the SME should be driven by its business needs and the implementation must be flexible and fast to better cope with the speed of innovation in ICT and the SME requirements.
Large projects are expected to achieve critical mass and to better exploit EU-added value. The action may involve financial support to third parties in line with the conditions set out in Part K of the General Annexes. The consortium will define the selection process of additional users and suppliers for which financial support will be granted (typically in the order of EUR 30.000 – 100.000  per party). A maximum of 50% of the EU funding requested by the proposal should be allocated to this purpose.
ii. Application driven core photonic devices integrated in systems: Actions should address validation and demonstration of photonic based systems for the target applications. Actions should also include standardisation activities. They should demonstrate strong industrial commitment, be driven by user needs and concrete business cases supported by strong exploitation strategies, and cover the whole value/supply chain and the end-user. Focus is on one of the following themes:  
1.    Biophotonics: imaging systems for in-depth disease diagnosis: The objective is the demonstration and validation in real-settings of innovative, easy to operate, compact, and non- or minimally invasive imaging systems to support diagnosis of age and life-style related diseases. The imaging system should either be label-free or be based on already/rapidly safety-approved labels. The feasibility and validity of the diagnostics approach should already have been demonstrated and it should potentially have a significant advantage with respect to current diagnostic approaches. The action should further develop, improve and assess the imaging system under a sufficient range of realistic conditions and disease profiles. The evaluation of its usability and applicability and its validation in clinical settings should be included.Actions should be driven by medical equipment manufacturers that are capable of and committed to the commercialisation of the solutions and include teams of physicians/clinicians to take part in the development and the functional and quantitative validation. Clinical trials are not covered by these actions and will normally take place after these actions.  
2.    Sensing for process and product monitoring and analysis: The prototyping and testing of new process analytical instrumentation for on-line/in-line control, targeting the food and pharmaceutical industry, based on compact and miniaturized photonics sensors that include novel key photonics components and modules. This new instrumentation should show significant improvements beyond the state of the art in sensitivity, specificity, long term stability (including calibration stability), high measurement rate, and reliability. Instruments should have self-testing/-monitoring functionalities and on-site calibration capabilities. The significant advantages compared to conventional sensors in terms of performance or cost, as appropriate, have to be demonstrated in a specific industrial application for monitoring product quality in real settings.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 8 and 10 million (for theme b.i) and between 6 and 8 million (for theme b.ii) would allow these themes to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. Minimum one action per theme will be selected.
c. Coordination and Support actions
Supporting the industrial strategy for photonics in Europe: the objective is to support the development and implementation of a comprehensive industrial strategy for photonics in Europe. The action should include the development of strategic technology road-maps, strong stakeholder engagement (in particular Photonics21 stakeholders, National Technology Platforms, regional Clusters, end-user industries), coordination of regional, national and European strategies and priorities, and development of financial models and financial engineering to facilitate access to different sources of financing.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 3 million would allow this theme to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. No more than one action will be funded.

Expected Impact
: Proposals should describe how the proposed work will contribute to the listed corresponding expected impacts and should provide metrics, the baseline and concrete targets.
a. Research and Innovation Actions
i. Agile Petabit/s Optical Core and Metro Networks  
•    next generation agile, high-capacity and energy efficient core and metro networks to support the highly connected and communicating society;  
•    Secured industrial leadership in optical communications systems for core and metro networks and reinforcing the full value chain in Europe.
ii. Photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technology  
•    Industrial volume manufacturing in Europe of PICs with significant competitive advantages in cost/performance and with reduced development costs;  
•    New or significantly enhanced integration technology platforms for a more competitive European photonic industry.
iii. Disruptive approaches to optical manufacturing by 2 and 3 D opto-structuring  
•    Technology leadership in optical manufacturing of 2 and 3 D opto-structuring;  
•    Emergence of innovative optical components or material for specific applications.
b. Innovation Actions
i. An Innovation Incubator for SMEs  
•    Broader and faster take-up of photonics in innovative products, in particular by SMEs.
ii.1. Biophotonics: imaging systems for in-depth disease diagnosis  
•    Substantially improved and wider deployed in-depth diagnosis, and more effective treatment of age and life-style related diseases; 
•    increased market presence in the Diagnostic and Analysis Imaging Systems and increased European competitiveness of the medical equipment industry.
ii.2. Sensing for process and product monitoring and analysis  
•    Increased process monitoring efficiency in the food and pharmaceutical industries and reduction of waste along the logistic food and drugs chain;  
•    Increased competitiveness of the European process and product monitoring equipment industry.
c. Coordination and Support actions   
•    Reinforced value chains and deployment of photonics technologies by stronger cooperation of photonics stakeholders, clusters and end-users;  
•    Increased competitiveness of the European photonics sector and improved access to risk finance for the photonics sector in Europe.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action, Innovation action, Coordination and support action
ICT-39-2016-2017International partnership building in low and middle income countriesd.l. 25-04-2017
Call H2020-ICT-2017-2 (subcall de: H2020-ICT-2017)
Information and Communication Technologies
Orçamento 392,00 M€
Specific Challenge: To reinforce cooperation and strategic partnership with selected countries and regions in areas of mutual interest.

Targeted countries: Low and middle income countries  in sub-Saharan Africa and ASEAN countries

Scope: a. Innovations Actions
Actions will address the requirements of end-user communities in developing countries. This may include technological improvements and adaptations as well as innovative service creation based on existing technologies.
Proposals could include specific technological targets such as co-design, adaptation, demonstration and validation (e.g. pilots) of ICT related research and innovation in relevant thematic areas addressed by Horizon 2020 including Content Technologies and Societal Challenges. Proposals are expected to address take up and scalability of the proposed solutions.
Activities under this topic should be led by a clearly defined user need/market opportunity for the technology being adapted; they should in particular include requirements of developing countries (at national and local level), and where possible, have the potential for wider impact by involving a number of countries from the same region. Proposals should feature an explicit element exploring technology adoption, through understanding and evaluating behavioural responses to the introduction of new technologies in different regional settings. Societal and gender issues will be taken into account. Proposals should be submitted by a partnership complementing each other with a particular focus on the participation of relevant developing country innovation stakeholders and end-user community representatives (e.g. relevant public, private, education and research, and societal sector organisations, Innovation Hubs or Living Labs).
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:  
•    Development of relevant technology responding to specific needs and conditions of the target country; 
•    Sustainable uptake of results within the targeted countries, beyond the project completion date; 
•    Reinforced international dimension of the ICT and Innovation aspects of Horizon 2020 and a higher level of international cooperation with low and middle income countries in ICT R&D and Innovation, focusing on areas that are beneficial to the target countries/region; 
•    Reinforcement of strategic partnerships with selected countries and regions in areas of mutual interest and added value in jointly addressing important issues.

Type of Action: Innovation action

   

Saúde    <<    Espaço
GALILEO-2-2017EGNSS mass market applicationsd.l. 01-03-2017
Call H2020-GALILEO-GSA-2017 (subcall de: Galileo - Applications in Satellite Navigation)
Call-Applications in Satellite Navigation- Galileo-2017
Orçamento 33,00 M€
Specific Challenge:

The past 10 years have seen a wider and wider uptake of GNSS based user technology, initially with the Personal Navigation Devices in our cars and then with smartphones in our pockets. Nowadays this also includes tablets, laptops, cameras, fitness gears and wearable devices, etc. In addition, recent trends are showing that not only “every person” but in the future also “everything” will be connected and equipped with a GNSS device (e.g. connected vehicles and internet of things). This is opening a new generation of Location Based Services (LBS). The development of this new generation of LBS is driven by different needs, depending on the application: mobility, productivity, safety, etc. To satisfy these needs, the key requirements for GNSS are Time-To-First-Fix (TTFF), accuracy and availability. Galileo satellites will further improve signal availability, thus enhancing continuity of service for LBS in urban or challenging environments. By contributing to multi-constellation solutions, Galileo can satisfy the need for higher accuracy and fast TTFF of demanding applications.

The specific challenge of this topic is to exploit the availability of GNSS enabled mass market devices, developing innovative EGNSS applications that will:

  • Foster the adoption of EGNOS and Galileo in mass markets and ensure that the benefits will be captured by the users.
  • Create applications that will make best use of EGNSS innovative features such as better multipath resistance, authentication etc.
  • Contribute to the competitiveness of the European GNSS industry in the area of mobile applications, with special focus on the innovative role of SMEs.
  • Maximise public benefits by supporting the development of applications that will address major societal challenges in focus areas such as health, citizen safety, mobility, smart cities, sustainable resources monitoring and management, regional growth, low-carbon energy infrastructure planning and protection, climate action.


Scope:

Proposals should aim at developing new innovative applications, with commercial impact and a clear market uptake perspective. Below are some areas which are identified as especially promising for further EGNSS applications development:

Mobility as a service and Smart Cities: Development of EGNSS solutions for cross-modal mobility and new emerging “mobility as a service” approach should be addressed, in which the user does not buy a vehicle or a public transport ticket, but a service to comply with her/his mobility needs. This area may include innovative telematics applications in which the positioning, timing and navigation are used both to deliver the mobility service and to calculate a fair price based on the actual use of it. Development of EGNSS solutions for other areas of future Smart Cities are also included in the scope.

Internet of things: Development of EGNSS solutions for “internet of things” should be addressed, exploiting the interconnectivity of uniquely identifiable devices and the availability of their location. Proposals should duly reflect the fact that the internet of things is not only improving productivity and efficiency of organisations (with applications in almost every sector of the economy, from automotive to consumer electronics, healthcare or manufacturing and logistics), but that the internet of things technology is also changing our daily lives.

Commercial and social LBS: Proposals should address one of the two following application areas. 1) Applications for commercial LBS, such as: secure financial transactions; mobile workforce management, tracking solutions; augmented reality; social networking and sport. 2) Applications for social LBS, such as: safety and emergency (E112), e-health (health services more and more connected), and solutions supporting visual and mobility of impaired people.

For all the mass market areas, the development and innovation should build on:

  • Galileo features that improve performances in urban environment ;
  • Multi-constellation, fusion with other positioning techniques, including sensor fusion and innovative network fusion techniques;
  • Authentication services that will be provided by Galileo; and
  • Techniques to optimise power consumption.

Attention should be paid to socio-economic considerations such as consumer needs, consumer behaviour (including early adopters), lifestyles, as well due consideration should be given to applicable legal frameworks and ethical issues such as privacy and data protection.

EGNSS should be part and parcel of the envisaged solution(s). However, where a combination of EGNSS with other technologies is required to make the application(s) work, this is not excluded from the scope.

In projects to be funded under this topic participation of industry, in particular SMEs, is encouraged.

Proposals addressing PRS (Public Regulated Service) related applications are not in the scope of this action.

The Commission considers that one proposal requesting a contribution from the EU of between EUR 1 and 3 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.


Expected Impact:

Activities should aim at developing highly innovative and adaptive applications taking advantage of the Galileo and EGNOS added value. The proposal shall have a clear intention to commercialise the products and services developed, including a business plan. The consumer chipset and devices manufacturers (e.g. for smartphones and tablets) are mainly produced in non-European countries and the expected impact of this topic is to foster the competitiveness of European GNSS application providers that build innovation on these chipsets and devices, contributing to increase the overall EU competitiveness in the mass market. In addition, considering that the EU has a good market share of machine to machine chipset and module providers, the expected impact is also to foster applications building on this capacity.

Type of Action: IA

   

Saúde    <<    Bio Economia
BG-06-2017Interaction between people, oceans and seas: a strategic approach towards healthcare and well-beingd.l. 14-02-2017
Call H2020-BG-2017 (subcall de: H2020-BG-2016-2017)
BLUE GROWTH - DEMONSTRATING AN OCEAN OF OPPORTUNITIES
Orçamento 47,00 M€

Specific ChallengeThe interaction between people, oceans, seas and coasts is a broad domain with significant impacts on human health and well-being. However, it remains fragmented, poorly understood and underexploited. As coastal populations grow worldwide, not only due to permanent dwellers but also due to increasingly larger number of tourists, the determinants and impacts of this link between oceans and people become more relevant. On the one hand, the seas provide benefits namely through food, feed and positive impacts on overall wellness. On the other hand, the risks associated with the marine environment include chemical and physical pollutants of anthropogenic origin, harmful algal blooms, and countless marine microorganisms that lead to a still poorly assessed proportion of human morbidity and mortality. Therefore, the challenge is to coordinate the existing multidisciplinary research knowledge and resources, including distributed infrastructures, across Europe. This would make it easier to take advantage of the benefits and to better manage the risks of the interaction between oceans and people using an ecosystem-based approach and to formulate evidence-based policies that can benefit citizens as well as achieving good environmental status.

ScopeProposals should include a plan for the creation of a multi-stakeholder forum that would make it possible to better understand the potential health benefits of marine and coastal ecosystems including in economic terms, anticipate new threats to public health more effectively, identify ways of improving ecosystem services that the marine environment can provide and contribute to reducing the burden of diseases caused by the interplay between marine-degraded environments and human behaviour. This forum is expected to issue a strategic research agenda based on data covering the biological, cultural and socio-economic dimensions of the interaction between oceans and human health that can ultimately impact morbidity and mortality in the general population. Data should encompass sex and gender differences in the populations studied. Data should be assessed through an active involvement of diverse stakeholders across Europe, including local marine communities, civil society, industry, and public authorities.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 2 million would allow this challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude the submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Projects funded under this topic will by default participate in the Pilot on Open Research Data in Horizon 2020, with the option to opt-out, as described in the introduction.

Expected ImpactIn order to support key EU policies, in particular those directly related to the marine and maritime sectors, such as the EU Blue Growth Agenda, the Blue Tourism Communication and the Marine Strategy Framework Directive, proposals are expected to:

  • Create a multi-stakeholder forum that issues a strategic research agenda for oceans and human health, based on new scientific and/or technological evidence and best practices across different geographical locations and climates.
  • Highlight novel, cost-effective solutions or interventions that enable effective policy making that aims to maximise health benefits and minimising risks derived from exposure to marine and coastal ecosystems.
  • Actively involve local communities across different European maritime regions, comprising civil society, industry, public authorities in data supply, knowledge generation and solution implementation processes.
  • Improve global cooperation around oceans and human health.
  • Improve the professional skills and competences for those working and being trained to work within the blue economy.

Type of action: Coordination and support action

BG-08-2017Innovative sustainable solutions for improving the safety and dietary properties of seafoodd.l. 14-02-2017
Call H2020-BG-2017 (subcall de: H2020-BG-2016-2017)
BLUE GROWTH - DEMONSTRATING AN OCEAN OF OPPORTUNITIES
Orçamento 47,00 M€

Specific Challenge: The seafood ['Seafood' comprises marine and fresh water biological resources (as defined in the Common Fisheries Policy) from both fisheries and aquaculture] production and processing industry contributes substantially to food security, employment and trade in regions where the activity takes place. To safeguard and strengthen this and make the activity more sustainable, seafood production should be market-driven and consumer-responsive, addressing challenges such as increasing consumer awareness of food quality and safety traceability and animal welfare. Ensuring the sustainability of the seafood processing industry involves not only innovative technologies that could mitigate production hazards and environmental damage but also securing its economic viability and taking account of the consumer imperatives behind them. One way of ensuring the sustainable production and processing of nutritious and safe seafood products is through the demonstration and first application in the market of eco-innovative, sustainable processing solutions of marine and aquaculture-derived food products and nutrients.

Scope: Proposals should build on state-of-the-art research insights from EU and other funded projects in this field, with a specific focus on nutrition, quality and food safety (from harvesting to the final products). They should aim to generate new knowledge to develop commercial solutions for improving the socio-economic and environmental sustainability of the seafood production and processing industry, while also contributing to product quality and safety. Activities should directly aim to produce plans and arrangements or designs for new, altered or improved products, processes or services. For this purpose they may include prototyping, testing, demonstrating, piloting, and large-scale product validation, all with a view to paving the way for subsequent market replication and uptake by consumers. Proposals may take into account impacts across different locations and population segments, as well as the specificities of different types of seafood, also in terms of nutrition. Work is expected to benefit from the contribution of social sciences wherever applicable. Where relevant, proposals should address gender-specific aspects, and the gender dimension in the research content shall be taken into account [See definition of the 'gender approach' in the introduction of this Work Programme part]. Aspects of traceability, authentication and certification of EU seafood products and labels of quality should be conveniently addressed. The participation of SMEs that will benefit from the intellectual property and/or from the commercial use of the project outcomes is encouraged.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 7 million would allow this challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude the submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Projects funded under this topic will by default participate in the Pilot on Open Research Data in Horizon 2020, with the option to opt-out, as described in the introduction.

Expected ImpactTo contribute to EU food safety common standards and legislation for seafood products and nutrients, proposals are expected to:

• Ensure that eco-innovative solutions for the sustainable production and processing of marine and aquaculture-derived food products and nutrients are used more widely, as a result of greater user acceptance, higher visibility of innovative solutions and the creation of scalable markets. 
• Improve the competitiveness of the EU seafood sector, and increase opportunities for growth, diversification and job creation for the sector in general and SMEs in particular. 
• Benefit consumers by allowing them to make better-informed seafood choices. 
• Increase the availability of healthier, safer and high quality seafood, which will improve consumers' diet and health. 
• Improve the professional skills and competences of those working and being trained to work within the blue economy. 

Type of action: Innovation action

SFS-39-2017How to tackle the childhood obesity epidemic?d.l. 14-02-2017
Call H2020-SFS-2017-2 (subcall de: H2020-SFS-2016-2017)
SUSTAINABLE FOOD SECURITY – RESILIENT AND RESOURCE-EFFICIENT VALUE CHAINS
Orçamento 166,00 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de fecho 2ª Fase: 13-09-2017

Specific ChallengeChildhood obesity is one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century and its prevalence has increased at an alarming rate in the last decades. The main problem is that overweight and obese children are likely to remain obese in adulthood and more likely to develop noncommunicable diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular diseases at a younger age. An integrated EU approach to help reduce the impact on health of poor nutrition, excess weight and obesity is a political objective. A wide range of factors interacting at various levels are known to be associated with obesity. Overweight and obesity, as well as their related diseases, are largely preventable. Starting from an early age, diet and lifestyle have a strong impact on health throughout life. Therefore, the prevention of childhood obesity needs to be given a high priority.

ScopeWithin the context of improving the health of citizens and promoting sustainable economic growth, the main objective is to reduce childhood obesity and its comorbidities effectively. Proposals should focus primarily on specific target groups in the young (e.g., during pregnancy and foetal development, in infants, toddlers, most vulnerable groups in children, adolescents). To better understand the complex interactions between the factors influencing obesity in individuals and populations, it is necessary to combine the approaches and expertise from different disciplines (e.g. (epi)genetics, molecular biology, microbiome, gut-brain signalling, physiology, nutrition, physical activity sciences, information and communication technology, social sciences and humanities, education, environment, architectural and urban design, psychology). Proposals should consider a range of geographic, socio-economic, behavioural and cultural factors. Proposals should aim at innovative and efficient strategies, tools and/or programmes for promoting sustainable and healthy dietary behaviours and lifestyles. Proposals should reflect and build on existing initiatives and platforms and should provide a robust science-based impact assessment of the tools, strategies and/or programmes delivered for further consideration by policy makers. Tackling this societal challenge requires both interdisciplinary and multi-actor approaches engaging academics, policy makers, civil society and relevant industry and market actors. The gender dimension in the research content shall also be taken in account. In line with the strategy for EU international cooperation in research and innovation, international cooperation is encouraged, in particular with the US, Australia, New Zealand and Canada. Proposals should fall under the concept of the 'multi-actor approach'[[See definition of the 'multi-actor approach' in the introduction of this Work Programme part.]].

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 10 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude the submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected ImpactIn the effort to tackle the childhood obesity epidemic, proposals should show how some, or all, of the following impacts will be achieved:

  • Provide an understanding of which factors are involved and how they influence the childhood obesity epidemic.
  • Provide innovative, efficient, effective, scientific evidence-based and ready-to-use tools, strategies and/or programmes to improve sustainable and healthy dietary behaviour and lifestyles in children.
  • Transfer the generated knowledge and innovation to relevant stakeholders.
  • Strengthen interdisciplinary research approaches and foster participatory and inclusive multi-actor approaches for long-lasting implementation of the results obtained.

Type of action: Research and Innovation action

SFS-40-2017Sweeteners and sweetness enhancersd.l. 14-02-2017
Call H2020-SFS-2017-2 (subcall de: H2020-SFS-2016-2017)
SUSTAINABLE FOOD SECURITY – RESILIENT AND RESOURCE-EFFICIENT VALUE CHAINS
Orçamento 166,00 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de fecho 2ª Fase: 13-09-2017

Specific Challenge: In recent decades, sweeteners and sweetness (flavour) enhancers (S&SEs) have become key ingredients in food produced and consumed in the EU, and exported to and from it. Because of their diversity (natural/artificial, geographical origin, processing, caloric content, etc.), S&SEs are used in different foodstuffs and food processes and in different dosages. However, information is lacking about new and emerging S&SEs throughout the agri-food chain, (e.g. their potential use in single or multiple food (ingredient) production chains, traceability, production and/or processing (cost) efficiency, safety and quality risks/benefits (for single or combined use), allergenicity and sustainability). The interaction of all these factors influences the role of S&SEs in a healthy diet and the fight against obesity. In addition, the toxicological impact of relevant doses, combined effects and the prolonged use of S&SEs are still unknown and the health-related aspects need further investigation.

Scope: Proposals should focus on health, obesity and safety aspects (including combined/prolonged use, metabolic effects and gut brain signalling, neuro-behaviour, and effects on the microbiota) associated with S&SEs, including technological aspects (e.g. functionality and stability) of including S&SEs in food matrices. Activities indicated in the proposals should explore the sustainability of the whole value chain (ingredient sourcing, production/processing, market opportunities for new and emerging S&SEs). They should investigate consumer perceptions and preferences giving proper consideration to the underlying physiological, psychological and socio-economic drivers. The approach should be interdisciplinary and should give careful and detailed consideration to the regulatory framework. Proposals should also include dissemination to all stakeholders as well as the food industry, including small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Where relevant, proposals should address gender-specific aspects and the gender dimension in the research content shall be taken into account.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 9 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude the submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected ImpactWith the objective of combating obesity, while improving sustainable food security in the EU, proposals should show how some, or all, of the following impacts will be achieved:

  • Promote healthy diets and contribute to combating obesity while improving sustainable food security in the EU.
  • Stimulate market uptake (with a specific focus on small and medium-sized enterprises) of new, healthy and sustainable S&SEs.
  • Strengthen the EU economy with a move towards more sustainable and future-oriented business practices.
  • Dissemination to EU food, health and food ingredient stakeholders, especially to food-related SMEs.
  • Evidence-based policy inputs on health, environmental and food safety issues.

Type of action: Research and Innovation action

SFS-46-2017Alternative production system to address anti-microbial drug usage, animal welfare and the impact on healthd.l. 14-02-2017
Call H2020-SFS-2017-2 (subcall de: H2020-SFS-2016-2017)
SUSTAINABLE FOOD SECURITY – RESILIENT AND RESOURCE-EFFICIENT VALUE CHAINS
Orçamento 166,00 M€
 Este concurso decorre em duas fases. Data de fecho 2ª Fase: 13-09-2017

Specific ChallengeConfined systems dominate in modern livestock production worldwide, in particular as regards monogastric species. These systems often constrain natural animal behaviour and may result in health problems and product quality issues. The EU and China are facing a similar challenge, though not to the same extent. Efforts to maximise production and ensure product safety often involve overuse of anti-microbial drugs in farm animals either in veterinary treatment, or for growth-promoting purposes in those countries where they are allowed. Drug residues may accumulate in animal products and the environment, lead to food quality issues and constitute a risk for consumers. Welfare and environmentally-friendly production systems may improve animals' immunity and health conditions, and reduce veterinary drug use, in combination with other measures such as good husbandry practices and biosecurity. The EU has an increasingly active policy on improving animal welfare and fighting the threat of anti-microbial resistance. As China is seeing high levels of veterinary drug use in increasingly intensive production systems, it has an interest in cooperating with the EU on strategies to make those systems more sustainable.

ScopeFocusing on monogastric species in confined intensive systems, the proposed research activities should assess the links between livestock welfare and health, the underlying factors, the related use of anti-microbial drugs and the subsequent presence of residues in products and their spread into the environment. They should in particular address immunity and health, biosecurity measures and residue detection. The activities should develop possible means, including tools, methods and schemes, by which more welfare-friendly production systems can help improve health and reduce the use of veterinary drugs. The proposed activities should, where possible, measure the potential impact of the proposed measures, including the socio-economic aspects and the scope for establishing schemes (standard-setting, management, policy, monitoring and verification components).

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 5 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed properly. Nonetheless, this does not preclude the submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. Contributions for Chinese participants will come in addition and will be made available by China.

Expected Impact:

  • welfare-friendly production systems (housing, equipment, technology) to improve farm animal immunity, health and welfare effectively;
  • reduced veterinary drug use at farm level and reduced residue in animal products in order to improve food safety;
  • improved biosecurity at farm level; and
  • contribution to the development of common legislation and standard-setting in the EU and China

Type of action: Research and Innovation action

   

Saúde    <<    Sociedades
ENG-GLOBALLY-01-2017Strengthening Europe's position in the global context: science diplomacy and intercultural relationsd.l. 02-02-2017
Call ENG-GLOBALLY-2017 (subcall de: H2020-SC6-ENG-GLOBALLY-2016-2017)
Orçamento 32,50 M€
Specific Challenge:

Europe is faced with numerous challenges that are increasingly global in nature and that have become of more immediate importance: peace and stability, migration, climate change, resource efficiency, health pandemics, etc. In many cases, responding to these challenges requires science-based evidence to inform decisions and joint international efforts that often include also scientific and technological cooperation. This is where science and diplomacy can join forces to form a 'soft power' tool in external policy – science diplomacy.

A main challenge is how to best link scientific expertise and cooperation with diplomacy and political influence to tackle major global challenges, promote knowledge and improve international relations. Science diplomacy has a particular added value in providing additional communication channels, particularly in stalemate situations and relations where few other mechanisms are feasible as well as on sensitive bilateral and multilateral issues. It promotes cooperation and conflict prevention, rebuilds trust and fosters shared understanding across countries, regions and cultures.

At the same time, the global context is characterised by competing understandings of central values and organising principles of society, including the meaning and direction of politics, economics, culture and ultimately human life. This context, and Europe's place in it, needs to be better understood and accounted for, from both a contemporary and a historical perspective, if the European Union and its Member States want to continue to constructively take part and strengthen their position in global discourses about what constitutes a "good society" and to understand how European policy interventions have been understood and perceived globally.

Addressing this challenge requires a great dose of (self) reflexivity about European diplomacy, Europe's own history and its interactions with third countries, regions, cultures and religions. It calls for a continued investment in fostering scientific, political, economic, social and cultural relations with other non-European global actors on all continents, and for ways in which to sustain scientific and intercultural exchanges that effectively enhance mutual understanding despite differences.

Scope:

The research to address this challenge should in particular focus on the following key dimensions. It is expected to either comprehensively address one of these dimensions or to combine two or three of them. The research may also cover other issues relevant for addressing the specific challenge.

1) Using science in the context of European diplomacy

In an increasingly complex global context, diplomacy as a social practice and profession is undergoing considerable changes. In both bi- and multilateral contexts, it is no longer sufficient for diplomats to be skilled in the art of negotiation, but they also need to have the capacity - alongside specialist knowledge – to take better advantage of science and scientific cooperation.

How to better prepare and employ 'science diplomats' remains a particularly unexplored research area. The research efforts should focus on examining the interface between scientific advice and expertise and diplomats' performance and capacity. It should analyse where science diplomacy can have the biggest impact and how it can be instrumental in strengthening EU capacities and strategic awareness and in establishing better mechanisms so as to anticipate events early and to swiftly identify common responses. This should involve 'practitioners' of science diplomacy.

Research should explore under which conditions science and scientific cooperation have contributed positively or negatively to reaching foreign policy objectives (peace, security, trade, development, humanitarian aid) in various challenging contexts and draw recommendations for the development of new actions at EU and Member States levels.

2) European culture, values and reflections of Europe's colonial past in contemporary European societies

European values are to a large extent determinants of behaviour. As values stay behind many societal patterns and organising principles of society, the knowledge of the past development of European values as well as the knowledge of their contemporary status could help to understand many aspects of behaviour of contemporary European populations.

Multidisciplinary research associating scholars from the humanities and social sciences should adopt an outside-in perspective on contemporary European societies and trace the manifold non-European and European colonial era-related determinants of present-day societal and cultural diversity in Europe. In so doing, it should pay particular attention to the way societal and cultural influences from outside of Europe have historically been framed, contested, transformed, refused or taken up in European societies. It should elucidate how and why some of these influences were able to strongly impact European societies, values, activities and culture, and why others were less successful.

Research under this topic will lead to a sound understanding of the social, cultural, linguistic and political legacies of colonialism within Europe and globally. It will assess their implications for policy-making, EU values and intercultural and interlinguistic dialogue, including the construction of plural cultural identities in nations and countries of Europe.

3) Global trends of secularisation and religious radicalisation and the role of Europe

Over the centuries the relations between the state and religion were of key importance for the functioning of state and society. Today's world is divided between secular states where government is officially separated from religion and states where this distinction is blurred, in addition to a few theocratic states. Whereas secular states are spread all over the world, and the religions professed and practiced by their citizens represent the widest possible spectrum of beliefs, the majority of countries which have embraced religion as their central norm are predominantly, although not exclusively, following Islam and are located in Africa, the Middle East, the Mediterranean region and Asia. A wide array of differences between official norms and practices still exist and should be taken into account in order to avoid undue generalisations between such countries and states.

Taking account of the diversity of forms of secularism and religion, and adopting a historical perspective, this multidisciplinary social sciences and humanities research should investigate and compare various types and experiences of the functioning of secular and religion-based states in and outside Europe. Its findings should clarify reasons for, and pathways of, transformation of the role of religion in state governance, and should explain differing perspectives of cultural and political co-existence within the polity. Specific attention should be paid to the analysis of the impact of religious radicalisation all over the world and its consequences on states' peaceful coexistence as well as of the foreign fighter phenomenon. Research should also focus on what these trends mean in terms of internal and foreign policies for the European Union, its Member States and the state-religion relationships on the European continent. In this perspective, it could also include the possible forms of injustice, inequality and exclusion that may contribute to societal tension and marginalisation of certain minority groups, as well as the common elements between religion-based values system and secular systems that could help to counter radicalisation.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU in the order of EUR 2.5 million for each dimension would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. This does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

Research under this topic is expected to impact the foreign policies of the EU and its member states and provide enhanced coordination between them and between the EU and its international partners. It will provide in-depth insights into the multiple ties and mutual influences between Europe and its neighbours, former colonies and other countries and regions, especially in the scientific, socioeconomic, historical cultural and religious spheres. It will also provide a sound understanding of contemporary European societies, of the multiple sources and expressions of diversity in the EU and of how non-European influences impact on the formation of European identities. Acknowledging the multiple sources of today's European diversity will have strong policy implications, not just for scientific and cultural policy, but also for immigration, integration, education and external policies. It will also facilitate Europe's future engagement with third countries.

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action

   

Bio Economia    <<    FET
FETHPC-02-2017Transition to Exascale Computingd.l. 26-09-2017
Call FETHPC-02-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETHPC-2016-2017)
Transition to Exascale Computing
Orçamento 40,00 M€

FETHPC-02-2017: Transition to Exascale Computing


Specific Challenge:

Take advantage of the full capabilities of exascale computing, in particular through high-productivity programming environments, system software and management, exascale I/O and storage in the presence of multiple tiers of data storage, supercomputing for extreme data and emerging HPC use modes, mathematics and algorithms for extreme scale HPC systems for existing or visionary applications, including data-intensive and extreme data applications in scientific areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, life sciences, materials, climate, geosciences, etc.


Scope:

Proposals should address one or more of the following subtopics:


a) High productivity programming environments for exascale: Proposals should have as target to simplify application software development for large- and extreme-scale systems. This can include the development of more productive programming models and environments, the easier combination of different programming models, and using increased intelligence throughout the programming environment. Key aspects include managing data transfers, data locality and memory management, including support for heterogeneous and reconfigurable systems as well as dealing with inter-application dynamic load balancing and malleability, adapting to changes in the number of processors. Unified performance tools are required supporting HPC, embedded and extreme data workloads, on diverse target systems. APIs, runtime systems and the underlying libraries should support auto-tuning for performance and energy optimisation. Automated support for debugging and anomaly detection is also included under this subtopic. To provide simplified development and to ensure the maintainability of domain-specific languages (DSLs), DSL frameworks are required which target a general-purpose stable programming model and runtime. Since large future systems will require the use of multiple programming models or APIs, an important aspect is interoperability and standardisation of programming model, API and runtime as well as the composability of programming models (the capability of building new programming models out of existing programming model elements)

b) Exascale system software and management: Proposals should advance the state of the art in system software and management for node architectures that will be drastically more complex and their resource topology and heterogeneity will require OS and runtime enhancement, such as data aware scheduling. In the area of hardware abstraction, proposals should address run time handling of all types of resources (cores, bandwidth, logical and physical memory or storage) and controls, e.g. for optimised data coherency, consistency and data flow. For applications, proposals should address new multi-criteria resource allocation capabilities and interaction during task execution, with the aim to improve resilience, interactivity, power and efficiency. To cope with the exploding amount of data, the sequential analysis process (capture, store, analyse) is not sufficient; proposals should explore on-the-fly analysis methods offering reactivity, compute efficiency and availability. Graphical simulation interaction will require new real-time features; configuration and deployment tools will have to evolve to take into account the composability of software execution environments.

c) Exascale I/O and storage in the presence of multiple tiers of data storage: proposals should address exascale I/O systems expected to have multiple tiers of data storage technologies, including non-volatile memory. Fine grain data access prioritisation of processes and applications sharing data in these tiers is one of the goals as well as prioritisation applied to file/object creates/deletes. Runtime layers should combine data replication with data layout transformations relevant for HPC, in order to meet the needs for improved performance and resiliency. It is also desirable for the I/O subsystem to adaptively provide optimal performance or reliability especially in the presence of millions of processes simultaneously doing I/O. It is critical that programming system interoperability and standardised APIs are achieved. On the fly data management supporting data processing, taking into account multi-tiered storage and involving real time in situ/in transit processing should be addressed.

d) Supercomputing for Extreme Data and emerging HPC use modes: HPC architectures for real-time and in-situ data analytics are required to support the processing of large-scale and high velocity real-time data (e.g. sensor data, Internet of Things) together with large volumes of stored data (e.g. climate simulations, predictive models, etc.). The approaches should include support for real-time in-memory analysis of different data structures, direct processing of compressed data and appropriate benchmarking method for performance analysis. Interactive 3-D visualisation of large-scale data to allow users to explore large information spaces in 3-D and perform on-demand data analysis in real-time (e.g. large scale queries or analytics) should be addressed. Interactive supercomputing is required to execute complex workflows for urgent decision making in the field of critical clinical diagnostics, natural risks or spread of diseases; this implies adapting operational procedures of HPC infrastructures, developing efficient co-scheduling techniques or improving checkpoint/restart and extreme data management

e) Mathematics and algorithms for extreme scale HPC systems and applications working with extreme data: Specific issues are quantification of uncertainties and noise, multi-scale, multi-physics and extreme data. Mathematical methods, numerical analysis, algorithms and software engineering for extreme parallelism should be addressed. Novel and disruptive algorithmic strategies should be explored to minimize data movement as well as the number of communication and synchronization instances in extreme computing. Parallel-in-time methods may be investigated to boost parallelism of simulation codes across a wide range of application domains. Taking into account data-related uncertainties is essential for the acceptance of numerical simulation in decision making; a unified European VVUQ (Verification Validation and Uncertainty Quantification) package for Exascale computing should be provided by improving methodologies and solving problems limiting usability for very large computations on many-core configurations; access to the VVUQ techniques for the HPC community should be facilitated by providing software that is ready for deployment on supercomputers.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU between EUR 2 and 4 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts. Proposals should clearly indicate the subtopic which is their main focus. At least one project per subtopic will be funded.


Expected Impact:

  • Contribution to the realisation of the ETP4HPC Strategic Research Agenda, thus strengthened European research and industrial leadership in HPC technologies.
  • Successful transition to practical exascale computing for the addressed specific element of the HPC stack.
  • Covering important segments of the broader and/or emerging HPC markets, especially extreme-computing, emerging use modes and extreme-data HPC systems.
  • Impact on standards bodies and other relevant international research programmes and frameworks.
  • European excellence in mathematics and algorithms for extreme parallelism and extreme data applications to boost research and innovation in scientific areas such as physics, chemistry, biology, life sciences, materials, climate, geosciences, etc.

FETHPC-03-2017Exascale HPC ecosystem developmentd.l. 26-09-2017
Call FETHPC-03-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETHPC-2016-2017)
Exascale HPC ecosystem developmen
Orçamento 4,00 M€

FETHPC-03-2017: Exascale HPC ecosystem development


Specific Challenge:

To develop a sustainable European exascale HPC Ecosystem.

Scope:

Proposals should address a single of the two following subtopics:

a) Coordination of the Exascale HPC strategy and International Collaboration: Proposals must include activities for promoting a joint community structuring and synchronisation; the further development and update of the Strategic Research Agenda for High Performance Computing as well as the application and applied mathematics exascale roadmaps; prepare the ground for targeted international research collaboration on specific aspects of the exascale challenges. Proposed actions should also seek to create synergies with other HPC related activities under H2020, in particular concerning the underlying basic technologies that are required for exascale computing (e.g. LEIT/Advanced Computing, LEIT/Photonics, and ECSEL (Electronic Components and Systems for European Leadership)); and concerning the relevant research in applications, the progress of which critically relies on cutting-edge HPC systems (LEIT/Big-Data, LEIT/Cloud area as well as relevant research in applications emerging from the H2020 Societal Challenges in domains such as health (e.g. VPH initiative), genomics, climate change, energy, mobility and smart cities).

b) Excellence in Exascale Computing Systems: The focus should be in boosting European HPC academic research excellence in future exascale-class computing cutting across all levels – hardware, architectures, programming, applications – and including specific actions to better structure the European academic HPC research, create stronger links with HPC providers and HPC users, attract venture capital, promote entrepreneurship and foster industry take-up.

The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution between EUR 1 and 2 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:

    • Strengthened European research and industrial leadership in the supply, operation and use of HPC systems.
    • Contribution to the realisation of the ETP4HPC Strategic Research Agenda.
    • Development of a competitive European ecosystem for building and exploiting a wide range of next-generation extreme performance computing systems.
    • Structuring the efforts of stakeholders for implementing the European HPC strategy.
    • Reinforced cooperation in international endeavours on HPC software and systems towards exascale.
    • European Excellence in Exascale Computing systems

FETOPEN-01-2016-2017FET-Open research and innovation actionsd.l. 27-09-2017
Call FETOPEN-01-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETOPEN-2016-2017)
FET-Open research and innovation actions
Orçamento 110,50 M€
Specific Challenge: The successful exploration of new foundations for radically new future technologies requires supporting a large set of early stage, high risk visionary science and technology projects to investigate new ideas. Here agile, risk-friendly and highly interdisciplinary research approaches are needed with collaborations that are open to all sciences and disciplines and that dissolve the traditional boundaries between them. The renewal of ideas is complemented by the renewal of actors taking these new ideas forward. Therefore, this topic encourages the driving role of new high-potential actors in research and innovation, such as excellent young, both female and male, researchers and high-tech SMEs that may become the scientific and industrial leaders of the future.

Scope: This topic supports the early stages of research to establish a new technological possibility. Proposals are sought for collaborative research with all of the following characteristics ('FET gatekeepers'):  
•    Long-term vision: the research proposed must address a new and radical long-term vision of a science- and technology-enabled future that is far beyond the state of the art and not currently foreseen by technology roadmaps.  
•    Breakthrough scientific and technological target: research must target a scientifically ambitious and technologically concrete breakthrough, argued to be a crucial step towards achieving the long-term vision. The plausibility of the proposed breakthrough(s) to be attained within the life-time of the project must be argued in the proposal.  
•    Novelty: the research proposed for achieving the breakthrough must be based on cutting-edge knowledge, new ideas and concepts, rather than in the mere application or incremental refinement of existing ones.  
•    Foundational: the breakthroughs that are envisaged must be foundational in the sense that, if achieved, they would establish an essential basis for a new kind of technology and its future uses, not currently anticipated.  
•    High-risk: the inherently high risk of the research proposed will be reflected in a flexible but effective methodology for exploring alternative directions and options, supported by open and agile research and innovation practices.  
•    Interdisciplinary: the proposed collaborations are expected to go beyond 'waterfall' configurations in multi-disciplinary science- and technology research. Instead they should seek new solutions through genuine exchanges, mutual learning, cross-fertilisation and synergistic advances among distant disciplines in order to open unexplored areas of investigation and new directions for joint research.
The Commission considers that proposals requesting a contribution from the EU of up to EUR 3 million would allow this specific challenge to be addressed appropriately. Nonetheless, this does not preclude submission and selection of proposals requesting other amounts.

Expected Impact:   
•    Initiating or consolidating a baseline of feasibility for a radically new line of technology and its future uses by establishing the essential proofs-of-principle and their foundational scientific underpinnings.  
•    Strengthening European leadership in the early exploration of visionary, new and emerging technologies, beyond academic excellence and with global recognition. This impact can be reinforced by involving also new high-potential actors such as young, both female and male, researchers and high-tech SMEs that may become the European scientific and technological leaders and innovators of the future.  
•    Impact is also sought in terms of the take up of new research and innovation practices for making leading-edge science and technology research more open, collaborative, creative and closer to society.  

Type of Action: Research and Innovation action
FETOPEN-03-2017FET-Open Coordination and Support Actionsd.l. 20-03-2017
Call FETOPEN-03-2017 (subcall de: H2020-FETOPEN-2016-2017)
FET-Open Coordination and Support Actions
Orçamento 1,50 M€
Specific Challenge:

The challenge is to make Europe the best place in the world for collaborative research and innovation on future and emerging technologies that will renew the basis for future European competitiveness and growth, and that will make a difference for society in the decades to come.

Scope:

Proposals should address one of the following topics:

  1. FET Futures [2017] [[This activity directly aimed at supporting the development and implementation of evidence base for R&I policies is excluded from the delegation to REA and will be implemented by the Commission services.]]: identifying strategy options, challenges and opportunities to stimulate and organise interdisciplinary research and innovation towards new and visiona